Lotus Mandala Duster

After seeing some great circular vests and talking about them with a fellow crocheter last festival, I came home inspired to do something I’ve had in my notebook for a while – rework my Lotus Throw pattern into a mandala-based circular vest! Which I did, and actually I did twice, which is why this post is a two-parter – each with a different FREE pattern guide. The sister pattern to this Lotus Mandala Duster is called the Lotus Circular Vest and can be found here.

IMPORTANT UPDATE πŸ™‚ – This is the OLD version of this pattern. If you are considering starting this pattern, I recommend using the NEW version, which has been cleaned up and has stitch counts and more detailed tutorial sections as well as TWO sizes instead of one. πŸ˜€

ACT ONE

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The Lotus Mandala Duster was one of those gravitational crochet projects that start with a small directionless idea and sort of grows and develops a certain gravity that pulls in other ideas and materials until it is way bigger than I meant it to be! It also qualifies as what I call a “sweater hack” since a large part of the materials came from yarn that was rescued from a boring old sweater and restitched into a new form.

Stevie3

This first piece was a doozy, because I wanted a really earthy western influenced duster style jacket and I also wanted to use up some #2 weight yarn doing it – I ended up using my fractal plied handspun for the center and outer accent, some recycled cotton blend sweater yarn** I’ve had forever, and a DK weight cotton blend to fill in the gaps. And I made the only partially conscious decision to add a little Lannister influence with a dramatic pointed bell sleeve. I guess I’ve been watching too much Game of Sleeves. I mean, Thrones.

**To get your own recycled sweater yarn, see my extensive tutorial Everything You Need to Know to Start Recycling Sweater Yarn.

Both patterns a bit more like guides, since the basic circular pattern makes it easy to add or subtract rows, adjust sizing, and freestyle if desired (it’s encouraged.) This Duster Β was made in size small, a few of the outer circle worked on only the top half (to balance the length since the armholes are placed high) and the sleeves are tutorial style instead of written in stitch counts. Β Since the Duster style coat was made with a bunch of homeless recycled yarn, I have don’t have a precise yardage requirement, but it tends to be around 1500 yards according to Ravelry and my own personal experience. πŸ™‚

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Lotus Mandala Duster

Notes: The Lotus Circular Vest has better close-up photographs of the central motif, so if you are having trouble figuring out a round you might find it helpful to look at the pictures on that post πŸ™‚

5.5 mm hook, #1, #2, or #3 weight yarn – the recycled yarn I used was around 17 WPI, which could be fingering or sport depending on which chart you look at. Be sure to test your gauge, listed below.

Gauge: 3″ measured across the diameter after Rnd 3.

Final Dimensions:
22.5″ radius (measured from center of motif to bottom edge)
50″ diameter (measured from collar to bottom edge)

Some terms:

4-DC Cluster – Work 4 dc stitches, keeping the last loop on the hook for each. YO and draw through all 5 Β loops on the hook.

Shell – 2 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, 1 dc, 2 hdc

Make Magic Ring.

HI THERE!! It’s me again. In case you missed it in the paragraphs above, you should really consider working from the new, updated version of this pattern. I left the old version up just in case someone still needs it, but the newer pattern is really where it’s at – two different sizes, rewritten instructions, etc. Okay, just making sure you knew. πŸ™‚

  1. 8 sc into the ring, tighten. Join with a slip stitch in first sc of the round.
  2. Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. (Dc in the next sc, ch 1) 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 3rd ch of beg ch-4.
  3. Sc into the next ch-1 space, ch 1 – counts as first dc with last loop on the hook. Dc into ch-1 space 3 more times, keeping last loops on the hook. YO, draw through all four loops on the hook – first 4-dc cluster made. Ch 3. (Work 1 4-dc cluster in the next ch-1 sp, ch 3) 6 times. Work 1 4-dc cluster in the next ch-1 sp, ch 1. Hdc in the top of the first cluster. This positions your hook in the middle of a ch-3 sized space to begin your next round.
  4. Ch 2 – counts as first dc with last lp on hk, dc into ch-3 space 3 more times keeping last loops on the hook. YO, draw through all four loops on the hook – first 4-dc cluster made. Ch 2, work 1 4-dc cluster in same ch-3 space, ch 2. (Work 1 4-dc cluster in the next ch-3 sp, ch 2, 4-dc cluster in the same sp, ch 2) 7 times. 4-dc cluster in next space, ch 2. Join with a sl st in top of first cluster.
  5. Sl st in first ch-2 space. Ch 2 – counts as first dc with last lp on the hk. Dc into the same space 3 more times keeping last lps on hk. YO, draw through all four lps on hk – first 4-dc cluster made, Ch 3. (Work 1 4-dc cluster into the next ch-2 space, ch 3) 14 times. Work 1 4-dc cluster in the next ch-2 sp, dc in the top of the first cluster.
  6. Ch 3 – counts as first dc, 2 more dc in same space, Ch 3. (3 dc in the next ch-3 sp, ch 3) 15 times. Join with a sl st in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3.
  7. Sl st in the top of the next dc. (Sk next dc, 2 Hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, 1 dc, 2 hdc in the next ch-3 sp – shell made. Sk next dc, sl st in the next dc .) 16 times. Join with a sl st in first sl st.
  8. Ch 6 – counts as first dc + ch 3, sc in the top of next tr stitch in the middle of the shell, ch 3. (Dc in the next sl st between shells, ch 3, sc in next treble, ch 3) 15 times. Join with a sl st in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3.
  9. Ch 3. Yarn over twice, insert hook into next sc and draw up a lp, (YO and draw through 2 lps on the hk) twice – one treble stitch leaving last lp on the hk made. Treble in next dc, leaving last lp on the hk – 3 lps remain on the hk. YO, draw through all 3 lps, ch 7. (In same dc as previous treble, treble crochet leaving last lp on hk, treble in next sc leaving last lp on hk, treble in next dc leaving last lp on hk – 4 lps on the hk. YO, draw through all four lps on hk, ch 7) 15 times. Join with a sl st in top of first treble.
  10. Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. (Work 1 4-dc cluster in the next ch 7 space, ch 2, 4-dc cluster in the same space, ch 2. 4 dc cluster in the same sp, ch 1*, dc in top of joined trebles, ch 1) 16 times, ending last repeat at *. Sl st into 3rd ch of beg ch-4.
  11. (Ch 3. 4-dc cluster in next ch-2 space, ch 2, 4-dc cluster in the next ch-2 space*, ch 3, sl st in next dc) 16 times. On 16th rpt, end at *, dc in same st as beg ch-3.
  12. Ch 3 – counts as first tr with last loop on the hk. Work 1 tr with the last lp on the hk in the next cluster. YO and draw through both lps on the hook – first tr2tog made. Ch 4, work 1 4-dc cluster in next ch-2 space, ch 4. (Work 1 tr with the last lp on the hk in the top of the next cluster. Sk next 2 chain-3 spaces, work 1 tr with the last lp on the hk in the next cluster. YO and pull through all 3 lps. Ch 4, work 1 4-dc cluster in next ch-2 space, ch 4) 15 times. Join with a sl st in the first tr2tog. – 16 clusters + 16 tr2tog + 32 chain space
  13. Sl st in next ch-4 space. Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 4 dc in same space. (1 dc in top of cluster, 5 dc in next ch-4 space, 1 dc in top of joined trebles, 5 dc in next ch-4 space) 15 times. 1 dc in top of next cluster, Β 5 dc in next ch-5 space, 1 dc in top of joined trebles. Join with a slip stitch to top of first dc.
  14. Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. Sk next dc. (Dc in next dc, ch 1, sk next dc) 95 times. Join with a sl stitch to the 3rd ch of beg ch-4.
  15. (Sk next ch-1 space, 1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, 1 dc, 1 hdc in next dc, skip next ch-1 space, sl stitch in next dc) 48 times.
  16. Ch 3 in the same st – counts as first dc. Sk next st, 1 hdc in next st, 1 sc in next st (1 hdc in the next st, sk next st, 1 dc in the next st, sk next st, 1 hdc in the next st, 1 sc in the next st) 47 times. Hdc in next stitch, join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3.
  17. Ch 5 – counts as first dc + ch 2. (Sk next st, dc in next stitch, ch 2) 95 times. Sl st in the 3rd ch of beg ch-5.
  18. (Sc in the next ch space, ch 3) 95 times. Sc in the next ch space, ch 1, hdc in the first sc of the round.
  19. Sc in the same ch space, ch 3. (Sc in the next ch sp, ch 3) 94 times. Sc in the next ch space, ch 1, hdc in the first sc of the round.
  20. Rpt rnd 19.

Armhole round:

  1. Ch 3 – counts as first dc in V-stitch pattern. (1 dc in the next ch space, Β ch 3, 1 dc in the same space) 10 times. Ch 30, sk the next Β 6 ch-3 spaces, (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 3, 1 dc in the same space) 10 times. Ch 30, sk the next 6 ch-3 spaces, (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 3, 1 dc in the same space) 63 times. 1 dc in the next ch space, ch 3, sl st in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3.

22: Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 1 dc in the next dc (3 dc in the next ch-3 space, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 9 times. 3 dc in the next ch-3 sp, 1 dc in the next dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 ch sts. 1 dc in the next dc (3 dc in the next ch sp, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 9 times. 3 dc in the next ch sp, 1 dc in the next dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 ch sts. 1 dc in the next dc (3 dc in the next ch-3 space, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 63 times. 3 dc in the next ch-3 sp, join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 480 stsΒ (It has come to my attention that this stitch count, and therefore some of the other counts following, might be off, so please bear with me until I can check it!)

LotusDuster2.jpg

The placement of the armholes determines the size – measure straight across the shoulder blades to check your sizing.

  1. Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. Dc in the same st, sk next 2 sts (1 dc, ch 1, 1 dc in the next st. Sk next 2 sts) 158 times. 1 dc, ch 1, 1 dc in the next st. Sl st in the 3rd ch of beg ch-4.
  2. Sc in next ch-1 space, ch 3 – counts as first dc + ch-1. 1 dc in the same space. (1 dc in the next ch-1 sp, ch 1, dc in the same space) 159 times. Sl st in the 2nd ch of beg sc+ch-3.
  3. (Sc in next ch-1 space, ch 4) 159 times. Β Sc in the next ch-1 sp, ch 1, dc in the first sc of the round.
  4. Sc in the same space, ch 4. (Sc in the next ch sp, ch 4) 158 times. Sc in the next ch sp, ch 1, dc in the first sc of the round.
  5. Sc in the same sp, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch sp, ch 5) 158 times. Sc in the next space, ch 2, dc in the first sc of the round.

28-30. Rpt rnd 27.

  1. Sc in the same sp, ch 6. (Sc in the next ch sp, ch 6) 158 times. Sc in the next space, ch 3, dc in the first sc of the round
  2. Sc in the same sp, 6 dc in next sc – one fan made. (1 sc in next ch-6 sp, 6 dc in next sc) 159 times, join with a sl st in first sc of the round.
  3. Ch 5 – counts as first dc + ch 2. Sc in 3rd dc of fan, ch 1, sc in the next dc, ch 2 (dc in next sc, ch 2. Sc in the 3rd dc of next fan, ch 1, sc in the next dc, ch 2) 158 times. Dc in the next sc, ch 2, sc in the 3rd dc of next fan ch 1, sc in the next dc, work 1 hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-5.
  4. Ch 4 – counts as first hdc + ch 2. (Hdc in the next ch-2 space, ch 2, hdc in the next ch-1 sp, ch 2, hdc in the next ch-2 sp, ch 2) 159 times. Hdc in the next ch-2 sp, ch 2, hdc in the next ch-1 sp, hdc in the 2nd ch of beg ch-2.

At this point the bottom of my duster was the length that I wanted it, so I switched to working the following rounds on the top half only so that the bottom wouldn’t be too long.

LotusDuster1

  1. Sc in the same space, ch 2 – counts as first dc. (Dc in the next ch-2 space, ch 1, dc in the same sp) 480 times. In first ch-2 sp of round, dc, ch 1, join with a sl st to 2nd ch of the beg ch-2.
  2. Sl st in the next dc and in the next ch space, ch 2 – counts as first dc with last loop left on hook, work 2 more dc in same space, leaving last lps on the hk. YO, pull through all lps on hk -3 dc cluster made, ch 2. (3 dc cluster in the next ch-1 sp, ch 2) 480 times. Join with a sl st to the top of the first cluster.

Work next round over entire brim of sweater.

  1. Sl st into the next ch-2 space, ch 3 – counts as first dc. 2 dc in the same space. (3 dc in the next ch-2 space) around. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Sleeves:

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After Step 1 of the sleeves

Step 1. Attach yarn on the inside of the armhole, ch 2 – counts as first dc.. 2 dc in ea ch space, 1 dc into the base of all 30 ch sts. 2Join with a sl st to the first dc of the round. For larger sleeves, work 3 or 4 dc sts into each ch space. Work the same number of dc sts into the base of the chain.

Step 2. Sc in the same st, ch 3 – counts as first dc + ch 1. Sk next st. (Dc in the next st, ch 1, sk next st) around. On the last repeat, replace the ch-1 with a hdc to position your hook in the middle of the space to begin the next round.

Step 3. Sc in the same sp, ch 3 – counts as first dc + ch 1. (Dc in the next sp, ch 1) around. On the last repeat, replace the ch-1 with a hdc to position your hook in the middle of the space to begin the next round.

After a couple rows of this, size down to a smaller hook if desired. I sized down to 4.5 to make the sleeve snug on my upper arm.

Rpt row 3 until your total reaches 17 rows, or until the length reaches your elbow.

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Locate the ch space that is centered at the back of the elbow and mark it. (14th space from the join for me) This will now be Β the increase center.

Step 4. Sc in the same space, ch 3 – counts as first dc + ch 1. (Dc in the next ch space, ch 1) until you reach the increase center. (Dc, ch 1) 4 times in the increase center. The middle chain space made in this repeat is now the increase center. (Dc in the next ch space, ch 1) the rest of the way around. Repeat until short side of sleeve is about mid-forearm (9 rounds for me)

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3 spaces created in one chain space forms the increase.

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After several rounds of Step 4

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Side view – Step 4

Step 5. Sc in the same space, ch 3 – counts as first dc + ch 1. (Dc in the next ch space, ch 1) until you reach the space before the increase center. (Dc, ch 1) 4 times in the next space. (Dc, ch 1) 4 times in the increase center. (Dc, ch 1) 4 times in the space after the increase center. The middle chain space made in the middle increase is now the increase center. (Dc in the next ch space, ch 1) the rest of the way around.

Step 6. Sc in the same space, ch 3 – counts as first dc + ch 1. (Dc in the next ch space, ch 1) until you reach the middle of one increase before the increase center. (Dc, ch 1) 4 times in the middle space of the next increase, work dc + ch 1 in between middle spaces. (Dc, ch 1) 4 times in the middle space of the next increase, work dc + ch 1 in between middle spaces. (Dc, ch 1) 4 times in the middle space of the third increase. The middle chain space in the middle increases made in this repeat is now the increase center. (Dc in the next ch space, ch 1) the rest of the way around. (Basically, put a 3-space increase in the center of each increase, dc + ch 1 in every other space.)

Step 7. Sc in the same sp, ch 3 – counts as first dc + ch 1. (Dc in the sp, ch 1) around. On the last repeat, replace the ch-1 with a hdc to position your hook in the middle of the space to begin the next round. – repeat until you reach 2 rows from where you want your sleeve to end (just past the wrist for me).

Sleevie1

Sleeve Detail. Witchy!

Step 8. On the 2nd to last row, 2 dc in ea ch-1 space, 1 dc in ea dc around.

Step 9. One the last row, 1 dc in ea st around.

Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat sleeve on the other side.

Weave in all ends.

And yes, I named it “Stevie” after the famous singer/songwriter and style icon, Sleevie Nicks. I mean, Stevie Nicks.

-MF

Update ! : Here are some photos of Steps 5 &6 of the ultra-ruffle sleeves, by request.

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After Step 5. As you can see, each of the spaces of the [(Dc, ch1)4x] increase have a [(Dc, ch1)4x] increase. For step 6, you will increase in the middle space of each of these three increases.

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Dc, ch 1 around the sleeve until you get the the middle (2nd) ch-1space of the first of the three [(Dc,ch1)4x] increases. (Dc,ch1) 4 times in that space.

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Dc, ch1 in ea ch-1 space until you reach the middle space of the next [(Dc, ch1)4x] increase – three times in this case. [(Dc,ch1) 4 times] in the middle space.

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Dc, ch 1 in ea ch-1 space until you reach the middle space of the third [(Dc, ch 1 ) 4x] increase. [(Dc, ch1) 4 times] in the middle space. Continue the sleeve by working one (Dc, ch1) in ea of the rest of the ch-1 spaces around.

It does hang kind of wacky at first, until you add more non-increased rows in Step 7 to balance things out.

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335 thoughts on “Lotus Mandala Duster

  1. OK. So I’m working my way through this awesomeness and am trying to figure out how many rows you added the “ruffle” bit (3 increases) on the sleeves. Even after I add my non increase rows, it still looks crazy for me. HAAALP!? πŸ˜™πŸ˜™

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  2. I’m finishing up my project and loving it but I’m big busted so it won’t close could i add extra rows just through mid section like from collar fold over to the center spots where you went back and forth as not to get to long. That hits about hip area. Would that look weird. I live in Utah and its pretty cold here I would like a little more coverage in front

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    • I think you could definitely add extra rows back and forth in the area you are describing – if you are worried about the disparity in height between the two sections if extra rows are added, I would recommend tapering off your rows so that each row ends just a little before the last one did, that way the height change is gradual and it will look more like a shawl collar πŸ™‚

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  3. Regina, I’m about half way through this pattern, and I just wanted to tell you I absolutely love how it is turning out! Thank you for creating such a beautiful, easy to read, pattern!! I’m fairly new to crocheting and I absolutely love this! Your pattern is easy to follow, yet it isn’t monotonous and boring! And the duster is so beautiful. I’m so excited to see how mine turns out. Thanks again!

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  4. I am having a slight problem with the armholes. I know how to do them, it is just 30 stiches is way to small for me. How can I remedy this? I am not proficient enough to do the math, can I add stitches to the chain and still go into the 7th v-stitch? I really want to finish this, like today! πŸ˜€

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    • Hi Lou Ann! You can definitely add stitches to the armholes as long as they are in sets of three (i.e – you can add 6, 9, 12 extra etc) If you add extra chain stitches to the armholes, I would recommend skipping a few more v-stitches, but I can’t say for sure how many. Also, if you are working a large, I would increase the number of v-stitches between the armholes by a few as well, it depends on how much larger you want to make it. So your armhole round could look something like:
      “Ch 3 – counts as first dc in V-stitch pattern. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 3, 1 dc in the same space) 10 times. Ch 39, sk the next 8 ch-3 spaces, (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 3, 1 dc in the same space) 12 times. Ch 39, sk the next 8 ch-3 spaces, (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 3, 1 dc in the same space) __ times. 1 dc in the next ch space, ch 3, sl st in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3.”

      That’s totally just a guess, but hopefully it gives you more of a template to work with!

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      • Thank you so much! I added 12 extra and it worked perfectly. One other quick question, you stopped adding to the bottom after Row 34, I need mine to be longer, do I work around until the top is where I want it, and then just work on the bottom? Thank you again for such an amazing pattern.

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      • Awesome! If you want yours to be longer, what I would do is work 35,36, and 37 around the entire circle. Then, you can add more to just the bottom easily by working rows of (dc in ea dc) back and forth across the bottom half of the circle, using hdc and sc at the ends of the rows to taper off. You could even do trebles if you wanted to get more length in fewer rows! πŸ™‚

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  5. I’m about to start row 35 soon and am wondering about you doing only the top half so it wouldn’t be too long…did you turn your work for each row, starting with row 35? Do you know what number stitches you actually went between, or is it something we have to eyeball? Also, I’m working this in a larger gauge because I’m a big girl, and I’ve found it got longer in the back sooner in the pattern than I anticipated (because I’m short LOL). Do you think if I skipped rows 28-30 it would still work out okay? I’m afraid if I add them in, the ending result would be dragging the floor!

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    • Good questions! The “working the top half only” portion of the pattern is definitely an eyeballing, flying by the seat of your pants type of situation as it exists right now. The repeats for those rounds are listed as they would be if you worked the rounds over the entire circle (not just the top half). I turned after working half of the circle (eyeballed or roughly calculated) and then turned again for Row 36. There’s a bit of a height difference between the rounds if you do this, which is something you’ll have to accommodate for in working Rnd 37, which goes back to working the entire circle. I am currently working on a rewrite of this pattern that includes better and more exact instructions on this part, but it isn’t finished yet unfortunately!

      As for rounds 28 – 30, you can definitely skip those entirely to make the sweater shorter. In fact, if you wanted to you could work 25, 27, and 31 exclusively, skipping the other rounds that constitute the diamond mesh pattern of that section, and picking up regularly from 31 to work the rest of the pattern. This would shorten the main body of the duster, and if you did that you could potentially just work rounds 35 and 36 over the entire circle and not worry about working the top half only. I know that’s a lot of options to throw at you but I wanted to make sure you could customize it the best way to fit you! And if you have more questions of course you know where to find me πŸ™‚

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      • I did 240 chain spaces for doing the upper part definitely saved me some yarn i love this pattern and i cant wait to do the 2.0 version

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  6. Pingback: Ravelry Projects Episode 3 | Morale Fiber

    • I see what you mean but actually there’s a reason for that! Rnd 3 reads: Sc into the next ch-1 space, ch 1 – counts as first dc with last loop on the hook. Dc into ch-1 space 3 more times, keeping last loops on the hook. YO, draw through all four loops on the hook – first 4-dc cluster made. Ch 3. (Work 1 4-dc cluster in the next ch-1 sp, ch 3) 6 times. Work 1 4-dc cluster in the next ch-1 sp, ch 1. Hdc in the top of the first cluster. This positions your hook in the middle of a ch-3 sized space to begin your next round.

      The reason that it says four loops and not five in the initial cluster of the rnd is that you don’t have an extra loop on the hook from any previous chains or stitches (because it is the first one). In the parenthetical repeat it just refers to working a “4-dc cluster” which, at the top of the pattern, is defined as follows:
      “4-DC Cluster – Work 4 dc stitches, keeping the last loop on the hook for each. YO and draw through all 5 loops on the hook.”

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  7. On the sleeves, for step 4 and on, did you continue with the smaller hook or switch back to the larger size? I’m so excited to be close to finishing!! This is a gorgeous pattern!!!

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    • After switching to the smaller hook in the beginning part of the sleeve, I always make the whole of the rest of the sleeve with the smaller hook. However, if you wanted even bigger bells, there’s no reason you couldn’t switch back to the bigger one πŸ™‚ Glad you are enjoying the pattern!

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  8. Pingback: The top of my crochet wish-list . . . – My "Round Tuit"

  9. I’m in love with this pattern! What are your rules for selling products based on your patterns?
    I have an Etsy account that could use a cool jacket like this.
    Thanks!

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    • Thank you! You are welcome to sell products made from this design as long as your status is an independent artisan and not part of a collective (i.e – you can sell it if you are an individual person, but you can’t sell it if you are a sweatshop, which I am sure you aren’t, lol) So glad you like it! ❀

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      • Hi Sarah! If you don’t have a blocking board or a dress form, you could use a rounded or padded hanger to hang this on after soaking it and gently squeezing it out. Make sure it is thoroughly squeezed before hanging – you don’t want too much water weight dragging it down. Use clothespins to secure the shoulders onto the hanger then grab the bottom of the garment and gently shake it out – grab and shake in several different places, it helps the mesh stitches settle in toward the bottom and helps the ruffles even out πŸ™‚

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      • Omg thank you soooo much you’re a life saver. I was racking my brain trying to figure out what to use.

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      • Ok, thank you! Would you like me to mention your blog in the product description or something like that as well?

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    • Hi Jessica,
      Round 12 throws a lot of people off – I rewrote it for the sister pattern, the Lotus Vest, but this pattern is still in the process of getting rewritten. Does it make any more sense this way?:
      “12. Ch 3 – counts as first tr with last loop on the hk. Work 1 tr with the last lp on the hk in the next cluster. YO and draw through both lps on the hook – first tr2tog made. Ch 4, work 1 4-dc cluster in next ch-2 space, ch 4. (Work 1 tr with the last lp on the hk in the top of the next cluster. Sk next 2 chain-3 spaces, work 1 tr with the last lp on the hk in the next cluster. YO and pull through all 3 lps. Ch 4, work 1 4-dc cluster in next ch-2 space, ch 4) 15 times. Join with a sl st in the first tr2tog. – 16 clusters + 16 tr2tog + 32 chain spaces”

      There is also a better picture of this round on the sister pattern post, where you can see more clearly what it is supposed to look like.

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  10. I absolutely love this pattern! I an making one for my daughter and she is super excited for it to be done. I have a question about rows 18 & 19. The last step ” chain one and hdc in first sc of round. ” I don’t understand the purpose of the hdc, and it looks a bit funky. Am I misreading the instructions? It may have been discussed in previous posts, but I couldn’t find anything. I apologize if it has. Thanks again for posting this pattern.
    -Erika

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    • So glad you like it! Don’t worry about the hdc, it throws a lot of people off at first but hopefully this will explain it:
      Basically you are creating a half-double crochet to stand in for the rest of the chain length that would normally go there. So instead of chaining the last 2 sts (since you’ve already chained one) you will work a half double in the next sc. Your hook will end up positioned between one ch st and a sideways-leaning hdc – this is the apex of the final chain space.

      You start the next round working into the space underneath the side of the hdc as if it were the space underneath regular chain stitches. Does that make sense?

      The alternative would be to finish the entire chain and join by slip stitching in the first sc of the round, but then you would have to slip stitch to get to the top of the next chain space to start the next round, which I usually find difficult and messy looking which is why I almost always use this method instead πŸ™‚

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      • Thank you for such a quick response, it is much appreciated. I do understand what you are saying about using the hdc. I did want to share with you what I ended up doing for the arm hole chain of 30. I initially did a chain of 30, but when I came back around to DC in each chain I realized that some of my chains had tightened up making it too hard to get my hook in. I think that making the dc’s around the chain looks too messy. So instead, I used a “foundation single crochet.” There are several tutorial videos on YouTube if you aren’t familiar. It made it so much easier to do the dc’s on the next row and has a a bit of stretch which I think adds well to the meshiness of the pattern.

        I don’t want to take away from how much I am enjoying the pattern. It is working up so quickly, which is wonderful! I only wanted to share what little bit I switched up. Thanks again for getting back so quickly.

        -Erika

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  11. Pingback: Pattern-Versary | Morale Fiber

  12. Thank you so very much for sharing this exquisite pattern! I’m using Lion Shawl in a Ball in Peaceful Earth, plus adding #20 Czech beads. Fingers crossed I don’t go crazy in the process… this is my first “jacket” ever.

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  13. I’m working this amazing pattern now, about to start on the sleeves. I’d like to try to add a hood, do you have any ideas or suggestions? Or has it been tried? I know I’ve put hoods on other projects and it failed miserably lol.

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    • Hi Meghan! Excellent question – the only example I have ever seen of adding a hood to this piece is a Ravelry project that can be found here:
      http://www.ravelry.com/projects/mrsmonkey1992/lotus-mandala-duster
      She doesn’t say how she did it but mentions that it was tricky, probably because of the extreme increases around the edges of the piece that give it lots of ruffles. So to answer your question, it’s doable but I’m not sure exactly how lol!

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      • Awesome! That looks very close to what I had in mind! I’ll let ya know how it turns out and try to remember to take notes! Thank you! ❀

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      • No problem! The newer version of this pattern that I am currently working on is more suited to adding a hood because I reduce the amount of increases between the shoulders, but it’s not finished yet 😦 All I do is work 1 dc in each chain space between the armholes instead of three on Round 22 – all the other spaces on that round remain with three in each, though. If you haven’t worked those rounds yet you might have better luck adding a hood with that modification πŸ™‚

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  14. My friend wants me to make her one of these. She’s a bigger girl and wants to make sure she can wrap it around her stomach. How big is this? Is it possible to make it bigger? Also, will any yarn that you quoted above work? Thank you!

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    • Hi Jennifer!
      The pattern as written here is a size small, but it is definitely possible to expand it by adding extra repeats of rounds 18 & 27. There are a couple other strategies for sizing up, such as increasing the size of the armholes and the distance between them and adding extra stitches to the sleeves – however, you may be interested to know that I am very close to releasing the new version of this pattern for free on the blog, which will include specific directions for a Large size option. That should be arriving within a month or so!

      As for yarns, since I usually work these in recycled yarns I don’t have a lot of experience in which commercial yarns are best – however, I would say that you should shoot for a #2 weight commercial yarn or a very light #3 weight. The only commercial yarn that I have worked this in is Premier Cotton Fair, a #2 weight cotton/acrylic blend (that’s the one I’m working the Large size in for the new pattern). It is coming out beautifully so far! I would guess that Caron Simply Soft Light (the DK weight version of Caron Simply Soft) would also work nicely, but I haven’t tried that yarn on this specific pattern yet.

      Hope that was helpful and let me know if you have any other questions!

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  15. Pingback: Chain & Stitch Join Tutorial | Morale Fiber

  16. Pingback: Lotus Duster 2.0 | Morale Fiber

  17. Mine looks right, but for somebreason I dont end up with right amountbof stitches for end of row. For instance row 14 says 95 times, I did mine ending in 85 dc including chain. How am i missing 10. I went back and alk peaks match. I guess will see ehat happens. I dont kniw where I went wrong and not tearing out. Lol

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  18. Oooooh I’m loving this projectπŸ’—. 🌹GRATITUDE🌹. I’m on row 25 (of the updated pattern) and wanted to share an errata here goes. ” 25. Sc in space formed by the hdc join of the previous round, ch 4. (((Sc in next ch-1 space, ch 4))) 113, 120 times. Sc in the next ch-1 sp, ch 1, dc in the first sc of the round. – 115, 122 ch spaces” I believe it should read “Sc in next ch-4 space, ch 4” according to the prev row? I’m pushing thru this row still I can’t waaaaait to send the pics😁! And yes indeed I was more than glad to send yarn money πŸ˜‚ teehehe. Light & Love🌴

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  19. Regina, I am having difficulty with steps 5 and 6. After doing step 5 do you repeat it a few more times or do you go to 6 and repeat it a few more times and then go to step 7. And when you do get to step 7 is it double crochet single crochet in each chain space all the way around until you reach your desired length?

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    • Hi Nina! For the Sleeves, those steps go like this:
      Step 5: Do only once
      Step 6: Do only once
      Step 7: Repeat this step until your sleeve is almost desired length, I like to hit at least the wrist (measuring with arm bent) for this portion.

      Step seven is just (Dc in the next ch space, ch 1) repeats, no increases or anything like that – same basic idea as the beginning of the sleeve. πŸ™‚ Hope that helps, let me know if you still have questions!

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  20. I love this pattern! I’m just having a little trouble with the first row of the sleeves. For some reason I’m struggling to understand this row! Could you please help me?

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    • Hi Chloe! The first round of the sleeves starts with attaching the yarn into the side of the V-stitch that is at the corner of the armhole, which just means treating that dc as if it were a chain space (on the armpit side – see the photo below Step 1 for reference). Ch 3 to get started, then work 1 (2 for large) more dc into that same space. Work 2 (3 for large) dc into the very next ch space, the same one which the V-stitch you worked into is placed. Then, 2 or 3 dc into each ch space (from the mesh portion of the armhole across to the other corner, including the chain space that the V-stitch at the opposite corner is worked into).

      That’s the first half – does that make it clearer or are you having trouble with a particular part?

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