Elf Coat Pattern

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Hi there! I’m really happy I am bringing you the Elf Coat Tunisian crochet pattern today, as this piece has been my secret baby for over a year and a half now (twenty months or so if you count the first draft).

This design started as a variation on my Shaman Coat pattern, a Tunisian crochet pattern that uses Tunisian Simple Stitch to create a rectangular-based overcoat with a big magical hood.

I wanted to try a coat with a flouncier A-line shape. This is what I made the following summer – you can read more about that project on this blog post:

I got positive responses and requests for the pattern, but to be honest I personally was not satisfied on how it came out. So I sat and pondered and then tried again, using inspiration from a favorite sweater of mine and other projects I saw out there in the yarniverse including the coats of the inimitable Katwise.

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The new design I came up with was solid, but needed a lot of tweaking and figuring, plus many hours of stitching of course. All this was done gradually as my life changed very quickly around me. When I recently (finally) completed it, I felt triumphant… but this was just for one size. I still needed two more sizes to complete the pattern I had planned!

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Well, I got impatient. I have been working on this thing for a long time, and I wanted to hurry up and share it. So I decided to share the pattern for the first size here for FREE, along with basic schematic descriptions and tips for customizing. I plan on adding more pattern elements and the written pattern for larger sizes  in the future –  but for now, please enjoy the Small size and if you make something with it I would LOVE TO SEE IT! ❤ ❤ ❤

UPDATE: This pattern is now linked in the Ravelry Pattern database, so you can throw a gal a favorite and/or link up your projects to the Ravelry pattern page here.

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Elf Coat Tunisian Crochet Pattern

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This elegant fantasy-inspired sweater coat features an A-line silhouette with a curling, pointed geometric hem shape inspired by flower blossoms, delicate pointed bell sleeves, and of course a long and ample pointed elf hood. The variegated yarn creates dazzling prisms of color across the separately worked pieces of the coat.

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Tunisian crochet using the Tunisian Knit Stitch gives the fabric of this coat an imitation-knit texture that is sleek and beautiful as well as warm. The modular construction makes this pattern easy to customize and style, and includes tips for sizing and modification from the written pattern.

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My own vision for future versions of this pattern includes too many ideas to maybe ever actually do! I plan to add corset lacing on this for sure (this version doesn’t have it because it is already so fitted). Also faux fur hemming, like the first draft… a patchy version using yarn scraps… added pockets… an ultra-flared version using all pointed wedges, a short sleeve collared version… Just a cropped jacket version with no skirt… an ornate version with embroidery or freeform crochet… felted additions…

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You guys might have to help me out with those. 😀 Speaking of which, if you like and/or make this pattern and you have feedback for me, please leave it in the comments! Questions and suggestions are always welcome.

Elf Coat Instructions

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Materials

6.5 (K) Tunisian hook
3.50 mm regular hook
King Cole Riot DK (#3 weight, 100 g / 324 yds, 30% wool, 70% acrylic – color shown is Autumn) – 10 skeins
Gauge for Riot DK: 9 sts & 10 rows = 2” (top of ea block = 3.5”)
Red Heart Boutique Unforgettable (#4 weight, 100 g / 270 yds, 100% acrylic – color shown is Meadow) – 13 skeins
Gauge for Unforgettable: = 8 sts & 9 rows = 2”

Size:

Finished Measurements:
Waist: ~34″
Bust: ~34″
Hip: ~38″
Sleeve: 22″ (measured armpit to hem)
Length: ~35″

This pattern, based on a 9-wedge skirt, using 5 pointed wedges and 4 simple wedges , is equivalent to a Small size. Larger sizes can be based on an 11-wedge skirt (5 pointed wedges, 6 simple wedges) and a 13-wedge skirt (7 pointed, 6 simple). Further tips on custom sizing can be found in the pattern, but no written pattern is completed yet for larger sizes.

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Notes on yarn, gauge, and sizing:

Yarn: I chose King Cole Riot DK yarn for this pattern because of it’s long color changes and pretty one-ply structure that makes the colors and the stitches well defined. The DK weight and 30% wool content creates a sleek and lightweight fabric that is also very warm. However, the big box hobby stores in the U.S do not carry this yarn – I get it from a UK website called LoveKnitting.com (which I highly recommend!).

So, I wanted to find a substitute yarn that is more commercially available and the closest I could find was Red Heart Unforgettable, which also looks gorgeous for this design. RH Unforgettable is 100% acrylic, which has the benefit of zero felting, and being allergy/vegan friendly. It is also a #4 weight yarn which means it will gauge differently.

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The two wedges worked in Red Heart Unforgettable

Gauge: Since the two yarns gauge differently, I have listed the gauges for each yarn individually under the materials section. These are using the 6.50 mm hook listed. If you use Unforgettable following it’s gauge, you can get a slightly bigger coat using the same stitch counts listed in the pattern. If you use Riot DK and follow that gauge, you will have the size coat pictured here and the measurements shown in the diagrams.

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9 stitches = 2″ in Riot DK

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10 rows = 2″ in Riot DK

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8 sts = 2″ in RH Unforgettable. It’s really more like 8.5 stitches, but we’re calling it 8 because of stretch!

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9 rows = 2″

 

It’s also an option to change the hook size for Unforgettable to obtain the gauge given for Riot DK, if you want to use the alternate yarn but still get the size pictured.

Techniques Used:

Chain (ch)
Tunisian Knit Stitch (TKS) – stitch used for each coat piece. Tutorial can be found on my blog here
TKS Increase (TKS inc): Increasing in Tunisian Knit Stitch – see TKS tutorial
TKS Decrease (TKS dec): Decreasing in Tunisian Knit stitch – see TKS tutorial
Linked Double Crochet (LDC): Creating a row of double crochet that are linked in the middle. Tutorial can be found on my blog here.
Slip Stitch (Sl st): Used selectively for seaming
Whip Stitch: Sewing stitch made with a tapestry needle with yarn as thread, used for seaming.

Technique Notes: Tunisian stitch is a wonderful crochet technique and I love it and highly recommend learning if you haven’t. But since this piece uses a simple stitch pattern (it’s just rows of regular stitches with some increases and decreases – that’s really it) a different technique can easily be substituted in. As long as your stitches match the gauge given, you could work this pattern in regular single crochet or regular knit stitch.

One Tunisian stitch = one regular single crochet or one regular knit/purl stitch.

I tested out some Riot DK in rows of single crochet, and obtained a closely matching gauge using a 4.0 mm hook.

Blocking: Not absolutely necessary but it does wonders for your finished piece, especially with Tunisian crochet which tends to curl. Blocking for this piece can be done simply by laying your piece out on a foam mat, using blocking pins to stretch it and make it lay flat and pretty and in the right shape. Using a spray bottle and plain water, wet the piece, then let dry. This works great with wool based yarns (King Cole Riot DK) and moderately well with acrylics (RH Unforgettable).

Okay, phew. That was a lot of info.

I tried to provide the answers to what I thought might be common questions for this pattern, based on what people have asked about similar patterns 🙂 If any of it seems confusing, please don’t hesitate to ask me here on the blog, or via my Facebook page

Now on to the pattern:

Simple Wedge (Make 4)

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Ch 15.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 13 sts. Return pass (RP). – 15 stitches
Row 2: TKS in ea ch st across the row. RP. – 15 sts
Rows 3-18: TKS across, RP. – 15 sts
Row 19: TKS in the next 6 sts, pick up a lp in the next space to increase. TKS in the next st, pick up a lp in the next sp to increase. TKS in the next 7 sts. RP. – 17 sts
Rows 20-35: TKS across, RP. – 17 sts
Row 36: TKS in the next 7 sts, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next st, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next 8 sts. RP. – 19 sts.
Rows 37-52: TKS across, RP. – 19 sts
Row 53: TKS in the next 8 sts, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next st, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next 9 sts. RP. – 21 sts.
Row 54-69: TKS across, RP. – 21 sts
Row 70: TKS in the next 9 sts, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next st, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next 10 sts. RP. – 23 sts.
Row 71-80: TKS across, RP. – 23 sts
Cut yarn and tie off.

Pointed Wedge (Make 5):

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Ch 15.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 13 sts. Return pass (RP). – 15 stitches
Row 2: In TKS, pick up a lp from ea st across the row. RP. – 15 sts
Rows 3-9: TKS across, RP. – 15 sts
Row 10: TKS in the next 6 sts, pick up a lp in the next space to increase. TKS in the next st, pick up a lp in the next sp to increase. TKS in the next 7 sts. RP. – 17 sts
Rows 11-18: TKS across, RP. – 17 sts
Row 19: TKS in the next 7 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 8 sts. RP. – 19 sts
Rows 20-27: TKS across, RP. – 19 sts
Row 28: TKS in the next 8 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 9 sts. RP. – 21 sts
Rows 29-32: TKS across, RP. – 21 sts
Row 33: TKS in the next 9 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 10 sts. RP. – 23 sts
Rows 34-37: TKS across, RP. – 23 sts
Row 38: TKS in the next 10 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 11 sts. RP. – 25 sts
Rows 39-42: TKS across, RP. – 25 sts
Row 43: TKS in the next 11 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 12 sts. RP. – 27 sts
Rows 44-47: TKS across, RP. – 27 sts
Row 48: TKS in the next 12 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 13 sts. RP. – 29 sts
Rows 49-50: TKS across, RP. – 29 sts
Row 51: TKS in the next 13 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 14 sts. RP. – 31 sts
Rows 52-53: TKS across, RP. – 31 sts
Row 54: TKS in the next 14 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 15 sts. RP. – 33 sts
Row 55: TKS across, RP. – 33 sts
Row 56: TKS in the next 15 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 16 sts. RP. – 35 sts
Row 57: TKS across, RP. – 35 sts
Row 58: TKS in the next 16 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 17 sts. RP. – 37 sts
Row 59: TKS across, RP. – 37 sts
Row 60: TKS in the next 17 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 18 sts. RP. – 39 sts
Row 61: TKS across, RP. – 39 sts
Row 62: TKS in the next 18 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 19 sts. RP. – 41 sts
Row 63: TKS across, RP. – 41 sts
Row 64: TKS in the next 19 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 20 sts. RP. – 43 sts
Row 65: TKS across, RP. – 43 sts
Row 66: TKS in the next 20 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 21 sts. RP. – 45 sts
Row 67: TKS in the next 21 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 22 sts. RP. – 47 sts
Row 68: TKS in the next 22 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 23 sts. RP. – 49 sts
Row 69: TKS in the next 23 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 24 sts. RP. – 51 sts
Row 70: TKS in the next 24 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 25 sts. RP. – 53 sts
Row 71: TKS in the next 25 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 26 sts. RP. – 55 sts
Row 72: TKS in the next 26 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 27 sts. RP. – 57 sts
Row 73: TKS in the next 27 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 28 sts. RP. – 59 sts
Row 74: TKS in the next 28 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 29 sts. RP. – 61 sts
Row 75: TKS in the next 29 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 30 sts. RP. – 63 sts
Row 76: TKS in the next 30 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 31 sts. RP. – 65 sts
Row 77: TKS in the next 31 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 32 sts. RP. – 67 sts
Row 78: TKS in the next 32 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 33 sts. RP. – 69 sts
Row 79: TKS in the next 33 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 34 sts. RP. – 71 sts
Row 80: TKS in the next 34 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 35 sts. RP. – 73 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

Skirt Construction

Alternating simple wedges with pointed wedges as shown, seam all blocks together with a whip stitch using a tapestry needle and a length of yarn.

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Since the rest of the pattern is based off of the measurements of the skirt waist, you could extend the skirt and figure the pattern out from there if you are adventurous. I have included notes in the rest of the pattern on modifying the pieces.

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Waist length for the size Small.

Skirt Border:

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The skirt border consists of 3 rows of Linked Double Crochet, worked back and forth, with increases at the point of each pointed wedge.

With 3.50 mm hook, attach yarn at one end of the skirt hem.
Row 1: Ch 3, LDC in each stitch across, inserting hook as if to TKS. 3 LDC at the point of each pointed wedge, mark the middle stitch of this increase.
Row 2: Ch 3, turn. LDC in ea st across working (2 LDC, ch 1, 2 LDC) at each point where the increase was marked.
Row 3: Ch 3, turn. LDC in ea st across working (2 LDC, ch 1, 2 LDC) in each ch-1 from the increase points of the previous row.

Once third row is completed, cut yarn and tie off. You can work extra border here if you want the skirt longer!

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Close-up of the increases at the point of each pointed wedge

 

WAIST:

The waist is worked directly onto the top of the wedges that make up the skirt. One stitch is skipped on every block, to create a slight decrease in width to accentuate the waist.

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Row 1: RS facing, attach yarn at end of the tops of the seamed wedges by pulling up a loop using TKS. With 6.50 mm Tunisian hook, pick up a loop using TKS from ea of the next 13 sts. Sk next st and seam. (Pick up a loop from ea of the next 14 sts, sk next st and seam) 8 times – or however many you need to complete the row across every wedge block. RP. – 126 sts
Rows 2 – 17: TKS in ea st across. RP. To modify the size here, add or subtract any rows  after the first one to make it longer or shorter.

Back Panel:

The back panel is worked the length of stitches that equals half of the number of stitches in the waist. In this size, the waist is 126 stitches. Divided by two, that’s 63 stitches.

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With 6.50 mm Tunisian Hook, Ch 63.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 61 sts. Return pass (RP). – 63 stitches
Row 2: In TKS, pick up a lp from ea st across the row. RP. – 63 sts
Rows 3 – 26 : Rpt Row 2.
Row 27: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 55 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 61 sts
Row 28: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 53 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 59 sts
Row 29: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 51 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 57 sts
Row 30: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 49 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 55 sts
Row 31: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 47 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 53 sts
Row 32: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 45 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 51 sts
Row 33: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 43 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 49 sts
Row 34: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 41 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 47 sts
Row 35: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 39 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 45 sts
Row 36: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 37 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 43 sts
Row 37: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 35 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 41 sts
Row 38: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 33 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP. – 39 sts
Row 39: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 31 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP. – 37 sts
Row 40: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 29 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP. – 35 sts
Row 41: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 27 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP – 33 sts
Row 42: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 25 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP – 31 sts
Row 43: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 23 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. RP – 29 sts
Row 44: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 21 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. RP – 27 sts
Row 45: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 19 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. RP – 25 sts

If working a different size, keep working in the pattern with decreases at both ends (or as necessary) until the remaining number of stitches is 25.

Cut yarn and tie off.
Front Panel – Right:

The front panels are worked with the length of stitches equaling the half of the waistband that the back panel won’t be taking up. There’s two, so each panel will be a quarter of the total waistband stitches. 126 / 4 = 31.5. Since that’s not a whole number, I will round down to 31 and fudge the seam a tiny fraction.

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With 6.50 mm Tunisian Hook, Ch 31.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 30 sts. Return pass (RP). – 31 stitches
Row 2: TKS in ea st across the row. RP. – 31 sts
Rows 3 – 26 : Rpt Row 2.
Row 27: TKS in ea of the next 28 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 30 sts.
Row 28: TKS in ea of the next 27 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 29 sts.
Row 29: TKS in ea of the next 26 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 28 sts.
Row 30: TKS in ea of the next 25 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 27 sts.
Row 31: TKS in ea of the next 24 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 26 sts.
Row 32: TKS in ea of the next 23 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 25 sts.
Row 33: TKS in ea of the next 22 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 24 sts.
Row 34: TKS in ea of the next 21 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 23 sts.
Row 35: TKS in ea of the next 20 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 22 sts.
Row 36: TKS in ea of the next 19 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 21 sts.
Row 37: TKS in ea of the next 18 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 20 sts.
Row 38: TKS in ea of the next 17 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 19 sts.
Row 39: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 13 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 17 sts
Row 40: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 11 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 15 sts
Row 41: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 9 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 13 sts
Row 42: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 7 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 11 sts
Row 43: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 5 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 9 sts
Row 44: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 7 sts
Row 45: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next st. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 5 sts

If working a different size, keep working in the pattern with decreases at both ends (or as necessary) until the remaining number of stitches is 5.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Front Panel – Left:

With 6.50 mm Tunisian Hook, Ch 31.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 30 sts. Return pass (RP). – 31 stitches
Row 2: TKS in ea st across the row. RP. – 31 sts
Rows 3 – 26 : Rpt Row 2.
Row 27: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 28 sts. RP – 30 sts.
Row 28: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 27 sts. RP – 29 sts.
Row 29: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 26 sts. RP – 28 sts.
Row 30: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 25 sts. RP – 27 sts.
Row 31: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 24 sts. RP – 26 sts.
Row 32: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 23 sts. RP – 25 sts.
Row 33: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 22 sts. RP – 24 sts.
Row 34: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 21 sts. RP – 23 sts.
Row 35: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 20 sts. RP – 22 sts.
Row 36: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 19 sts. RP – 21 sts.
Row 37: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 18 sts. RP – 20 sts.
Row 38: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 17 sts. RP – 19 sts.
Row 39: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 13 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 17 sts
Row 40: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in ea of the next 11 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 15 sts
Row 41: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 9 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 13 sts
Row 42: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 7 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 11 sts
Row 43: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 5 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 9 sts
Row 43: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 7 sts
Row 44: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next st. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 5 sts

If working a different size, keep working in the pattern with decreases at both ends (or as necessary) until the remaining number of stitches is 5.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Seam the Back & Front Panels

Using a tapestry needle and a length of yarn, whip stitch the sides of the panels together so that the long angles face each other. Stitch together the straight sides, not the angles. Once the bodice is sewn together, line the flat bottom up with the waist of the skirt and attach using a 3.50 mm crochet hook and a ball of yarn by working a slip stitch through both pieces.

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SLEEVE (Make 2):

If working a different size, the number of rows worked with increases in the start of the sleeve should equal the number of rows it will be seamed onto (across the angle created by the decreases in the front and back panels), plus 4 (sleeve is also seamed onto the top 4 stitches across the panels).

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Ch 16.
Row 1: Pick up a lp in the 2nd ch from the hk and in ea of the next 14 ch sts. RP. – 16 sts
Row 2: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 12 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 18 sts
Row 3: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 14 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 20 sts
Row 4: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 16 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 22 sts
Row 5: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 18 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 24 sts
Row 6: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 20 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 26 sts
Row 7: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 22 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 28 sts
Row 8: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 24 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 30 sts
Row 9: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 26 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 32 sts
Row 10: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 28 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 34 sts
Row 11: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 30 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 36 sts
Row 12: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 32 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 38 sts
Row 13: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 34 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 40 sts
Row 14: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 36 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 42 sts
Row 15: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 38 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 44 sts
Row 16: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 40 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 46 sts
Row 17: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 42 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 48 sts
Row 18: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 44 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 50 sts
Row 19: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 46 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 52 sts
Row 20: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 48 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 54 sts
Row 21: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 50 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 56 sts
Row 22: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 52 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 58 sts
Row 23: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 54 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 60 sts
Row 24: TKS in ea st across. Rp. – 60 sts
Row 25: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 60 sts
Row 26: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 54 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 58 sts
Row 27: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in ea of the next 52 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 56 sts.
Row 28: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 50 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 54 sts
Row 29: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in ea of the next 48 sts. TKs dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in the final st. RP. – 52 sts.
Row 30: TKs dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in ea of the next 46 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 50 sts.
Row 31: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 44 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 48 sts.
Rows 32 – 72: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 48 sts
Row 73: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 42 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 50 sts
Row 74: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 50 sts
Row 75: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 44 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 52 sts
Row 76: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 52 sts
Row 77: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 46 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 54 sts
Row 78: Row 74: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 54 sts
Row 79: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 48 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 56 sts
Row 80: Row 74: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 56 sts
Row 81: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 50 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 58 sts
Row 82: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 58 sts
Row 83: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 52 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 60 sts
Row 84: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 60 sts
Row 85: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 54 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 62 sts
Row 86: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 62 sts
Row 87: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 56 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 64 sts
Row 88: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 64 sts
Row 89: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 58 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 66 sts
Row 90: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 66 sts
Row 91: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 60 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 68 sts
Row 92: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 68 sts
Row 93: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 62 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 70 sts
Row 94: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 70 sts
Row 95: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 64 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 72 sts
Row 96: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 72 sts
Row 97: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 66 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 74 sts
Row 98: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 74 sts
Row 99: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 68 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 76 sts
Row 100: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 76 sts
Row 101: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 70 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 78 sts
Row 102: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 78 sts
Row 103: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 72 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 80 sts
Row 104: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 80 sts
Row 105: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 74 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 82 sts
Row 106: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 82 sts
Row 107: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 76 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 84 sts
Row 108: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 84 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

Seaming the Sleeve:

Fold the sleeve in half down the length of the piece. Seam together using a whip stitch, starting at the flare of the sleeve and moving toward the shoulder. At the underarm of the sleeve, match the remaining opening to the front and back panel sides, using the top 4 rows to cap the tops of the panels, overlapping the top by 4 stitches.

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Seam the sleeve using a whip stitch around the front and back panels.

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Close-up of the sleeve fitting.

 

Sleeve Border

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With 3.50 mm hook, attach yarn at the seam where the sleeve is sewn together.
Row 1: Ch 3 (does not count as first st), LDC 3 times in the same stitch, inserting hook as if to TKS. LDC in ea stitch around the sleeve. Join with a slip stitch in the top of the first dc.
Row 2: Ch 3 (does not count) LDC in the first stitch and 3 times in the next st. LDC in ea stitch around. Join with a slip stitch.
Row 3: Ch 3 (does not count), LDC in ea of the next 2 stitches. LDC 3 times in the next st. LDC in ea stitch around. Join with a slip stitch.

Cut yarn and tie off. You can make the sleeves longer here by adding extra border rounds of LDC.

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Close-up of sleeve border. Beware my join is not in the same place pictured as is written in the pattern – whoops!

HOOD:

The hood is worked as a separate piece consisting of one large triangle, folded in half when complete. To lengthen or shorten the hood, add or subtract rows of TKS in between the rows that increase.

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Ch 3.
Row 1: Draw up a loop from the back of each of the next 2 chain stitches. RP. – 3 sts
Row 2: TKS inc in the first space. TKS in the next st. TKS inc in the next space. TKS in the final st. RP. – 5 sts
Rows 3-4: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 5 sts
Row 5: TKS inc in the first space. TKS in the next 3 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 7 sts
Rows 6-7: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 7 sts
Row 8: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 5 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 9 sts.
Rows 9-10: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 9 sts
Row 11: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 7 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 11 sts
Row 12-13: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 11 sts
Row 14: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 9 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 13 sts
Rows 15-16: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 13 sts
Row 17: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 11 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 15 sts
Rows 18-19: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 15 sts
Row 20: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 13 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 17 sts
Row 21-22: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 17 sts
Row 23: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 15 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 19 sts
Rows 24-25: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 19 sts
Row 26: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 17 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 21 sts
Rows 27-28: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 21 sts
Row 29: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 19 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 23 sts
Rows 30-31: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 23 sts
Row 32: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 21 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 25 sts
Rows 33-34: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 25 sts
Row 35: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 23 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 27 sts
Rows 36-37: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 27 sts
Row 38: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 25 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 29 sts
Rows 39-40: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 29 sts
Row 41: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 27 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 31 sts
Rows 42-43: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 31 sts
Row 44: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 29 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 33 sts
Row 45-46: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 33 sts
Row 47: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 31 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 35 sts.
Rows 48-49: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 35 sts
Row 50: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 33 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 37 sts.
Rows 51-52: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 37 sts
Row 53: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 35 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 39 sts
Rows 54-55: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 39 sts
Row 56: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 37 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 41 sts
Rows 57-58: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 41 sts
Row 59: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 39 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 43 sts
Rows 60-61: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 43 sts
Row 62: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 41 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 45 sts
Rows 63-64: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 45 sts
Row 65: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 43 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 47 sts
Rows 66-67: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 47 sts
Row 68: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 45 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 49 sts
Rows 69-70: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 49 sts
Row 71: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 47 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 51 sts
Rows 72-73: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 51 sts
Row 74: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 49 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 53 sts
Rows 75-76: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 53 sts.
Row 77: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in ea of the next 12 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 13 sts) 3 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 58 sts
Rows 78-79: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 58 sts
Row 80: TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 14 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 14 sts) 3 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 63 sts.
Rows 81-82: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 63 sts
Row 83: TKS inc in the next sp. (TKS in ea of the next 15 sts. TKS inc in the next sp) 4 times. TKS in ea of the next 2 sts. RP. – 68 sts
Rows 84-85: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 68 sts
Row 86: TKS in the next st. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 16 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 2 sts. RP. – 73 sts
Rows 87-88: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 73 sts
Row 89: TKS in the next st. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 17 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 3 sts. RP. – 78 sts.
Rows 90-91: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 78 sts
Row 92: TKS in ea of the next 2 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 18 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 3 sts. RP. – 83 sts
Rows 93-94: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 83 sts
Row 95: TKS in ea of the next 2 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 19 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 4 sts. RP. – 88 sts
Rows 96-97: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 88 sts
Row 98: TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 20 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 4 sts. RP. – 93 sts
Rows 99-100: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 93 sts
Row 101: TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 21 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 5 sts. RP. – 98 sts
Rows 102-103: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 98 sts
Rows 104-121: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 98 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

Seaming the Hood

Fold the large triangle down the center length so that the right sides of the fabric are facing each other and the wrong sides are out. With a tapestry needle and a length of yarn, make a whip stitch seam starting at the point of the hood and seaming over the next 89 rows toward the opening of the hood.

Once this seam is complete, there should be 32 rows left un-seamed on either side.Turn your hood inside out so that the right sides are facing out again.

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How did I get the number of rows to leave unseamed? It’s (8+8) to account for the small angled part on each side of the front panel, plus (16+16) to cover the tops of the sleeves, then (25-8= 17) to cover the portion of the top of the back panel not already covered by the cap of the sleeves. This equals 65, but I rounded down to 64 to get an even number when I halved it – so 32 rows left unseamed on either side of the hood.

The hood then is seamed to the collar of the garment (once all sleeves and everything have been seamed) using a tapestry needle and a length of yarn. Whip stitch the hood, matching the points of the hood opening indicated by the red dots to the beginning of the collar on the front, also indicated by red dots.

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Seam the hood around the collar opening, matching stitch for stitch.

Front Border and Closures

We’re almost done! Next up is to use four rows of LDC to add a border across the entire front opening, beginning with the hem, working up the opening of the garment, going around the edge of the hood, and working back down the other side of the front opening. After the third row, we’ll stop and mark the placement of the buttons.

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Using a 3.50 mm hook, join yarn in the side of the skirt border rows.

Ch 3.
Row 1: 2 LDC in the side of each LDC from the border rows (6 LDC if you did 3 border rows.) 1 LDC in the side of each row across the next wedge, waist band, and front panel. 1 LDC in ea st across the brim of the hood. 1 LDC in the side of each row across the front panel, waist band, and the next wedge. 2 LDC in the side of each LDC of the skirt border.
Row 2: Ch 3, turn. 1 LDC in ea LDC of Row 1.
Row 3: Ch 3, turn. 1 LDC in ea LDC of Row 2.

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Close-up of LDC border

Now stop and mark where your buttons will be on one side, and mark an equidistant space on the other side of the border for where you will place your loops or buttonholes. I began with one button/closure on the top and bottom edge of the waist band, then used this measurement (17 sts between each placement) to space the other buttons. I made five button placements total.

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Once your button placements have been marked, begin the fourth row of LDC.

Row 4: Ch 3, turn. 1 LDC in ea st across until you reach a button/closure marker. If you are on the button side, keep working LDC’s. If you are on the closure side, there are two options: You can chain a couple stitches and skip over working a couple stitches, which creates a buttonhole within the band and a tighter closure. I opted to use a loop closure, which leaves the front a little more open when buttoned.

If using a loop closure, chain a loop just big enough to fit the button through, then slip stitch in the same stitch. Continue working LDC’s across the band, stopping to work a chain loop at any point where a closure is marked.

Cut yarn and tie off.

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Stopping to chain a loop closure

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After finishing the final border row, use a tapestry needle and a length of yarn to attach each button at the marked location on the opposite side of the closures.

After you have completed this, you are finished with the Elf Coat! At least, until I add more bells and whistles (figuratively… I think). Weave in your ends and block your work (blocking is highly recommended for this garment).

As I mentioned, I’ll be adding more sizes and features to this pattern as I go. I hope you are inspired to create a work of wearable art all your own ❤ The best part of designing patterns and sharing them online is that I get to help create artwork with people all around the world. Thank you, thank you, thank you for visiting and creating art with me!

-MF

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Winter Project Updates

Hi there! It’s not necessarily been crickets around here, but I do feel its time for some project updates of things I’ve recently completed. I haven’t had a whole lot of new things to show in the crochet category since many of the things I’ve had on the hook have been larger, longer projects that I’ve toiled at slowly in my spare time over the course of last semester. After the New Year I made it a priority to finish some of these things up so that I could MOVE. ON. FINALLY.

And so today I present two new project variations on two of my personal favorite original patterns, plus a skirt that I’d been hacking away at (literally). Prepare for photogenic twirling. There will be twirling.

Eyeball Sweater

I bought the yarn for this pattern, Yarn Bee Soft and Sleek in six different multi colorways, with some legwarmer project vaguely in mind. Well, that project was just not exciting enough to me, and so I started a chaotically rainbow version of my Spiral Sweater pattern.

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I worked it in size Small, but decreased every other stitch across the armholes to tighten up the front collar of the sweater (and also conserve yarn, which turns out was very necessary). I also skipped the Linked Double Crochet reinforcement across the back of the collar. Because I forgot. 😛

eyeball4Because I started with a central circle of solid navy leftovers that I had from a different Spiral Sweater, the middle part of the back started to look like the pupil of an eye, so I ran with that. After finishing everything on the sweater, I took some more spare yarn and slip stitched some crazy squiggles into the “iris” of the eye.

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I’ve always loved the nazar, a Middle Eastern charm symbol representing an eye, which used to ward off the evil eye.  This sweater is watching your back! Har har har.

You can find the project page, which also links to my original pattern in the righthand sidebar, here on Ravelry.  That bitchin’ tree man necklace I am wearing is from my friend Wendy’s polymer clay art shop, Dark Pony Arts – check her out, she is amazing!

 

Fairy Shawl

Though the Ida Shawl was originally designed to be multicolored, I’ve found that I really love doing them in monochromatic yarns, especially neutrals. This one is done with a DK weight acrylic yarn, Premier Everyday Baby in White, which used up all of three skeins once the fringe was finished. I really had fun plotting an outfit to go with this one.

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That’s really the only reason I do this. Excuse to dress up! Just kidding. Kind of.

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The Ida Shawl, as finicky as it was to get right during the designing process, is all the more worth it for the struggle. I still love that central design, which represents the seeds that form a star when you cut an apple in half horizontally.

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You can see this project on Ravelry too, with all of the pictures and a link to the original pattern. The leafy headwrap I am wearing is also a pattern of mine, the FREE Ivy Crown tutorial.

 

Jewel Skirt

This is the 5th skirt I’ve produced using Wendy Kay’s No-Gathers Gypsy Skirt pattern that I bought from her shop on Etsy, and this pattern has been WELL worth my money. Just chop out blocks and sew them together, no measuring (well, not much measuring) and you’ve got a beautiful dancing skirt to twirl in. Easy.. and fun!!

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I made this one from mostly upcycled fabrics, including some curtains from Goodwill and several yards of fabric I had had tucked away for YEARS that I got from a thrift market outside of the Portland Indiana Tractor and Engine show. It’s funny sometimes, when your craft supplies remind you of the places you’ve been and the other lives that you’ve lived.

I think sometimes that’s part of the appeal, for people who handmake things. It certainly is for me.

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The other skirts I’ve made I’ve given away or sold, but I think I’m keeping this one for myself. The jewel tones and floral print match nearly everything in my closet 😀

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I don’t put ALL of my sewing and refashion projects here on Morale Fiber blog, since I want the main focus here to be on crochet techniques, patterns and designs – but I do run a more personal side blog on Tumblr which I use for sewing and fashion stuff. Check me out there: Howling Mouse on Tumblr.

 

I do have more projects from over the winter that remain unfinished, plus some exciting new things budding! So I’m gonna go hustle that. As always, thank you for visiting!

-MF

P.S – I’ve gotten a lot of photo submissions of people’s projects that they have made from my designs lately – please keep that up! I love that so much! ❤ ❤ ❤ I hope you all have loved it too!

 

Daydreamer Poncho Pattern

Merry Day of the Dead! Today’s offering is a brand new PDF crochet pattern that I had (ahem) originally scheduled to release in August. Ha ha! Life.

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No worries here though because the Daydreamer Poncho is SUPER versatile as a layering piece and looks just as stunning worn over long sleeves and outerwear as it does over tank tops and dresses!  You can get this fresh design in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Pattern Store for 5.95 USD 🙂

More details on the pattern below!

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Daydreamer Poncho

Embrace your inner hippie with this dreamy lace poncho; easy and quick to work up using worsted weight yarn and a 5.50 mm hook. The mesh construction makes this a perfect lightweight layering piece that flatters the wearer with a fitted shoulder, A-line shape, and a fluttery fringe at the hem.

Featuring textural stitches in alternating colors and gradually widening chain loop pattern inspired by crocheted dreamcatchers, you can proudly wear this handmade piece in any season. The ribbed post stitch collar is finished with a drawstring cord topped by yarn-fringe “feathers”. The instructions for the Daydreamer Poncho come complete with detailed written pattern including tons of quality color tutorial photos, numbered and referenced in the text so that all the techniques are illustrated and easy to follow!

Materials

5.50 mm (I) hook

Yarn: Lion Brand Jeans (#4 weight, 3.5 oz / 100g, 246 yd, 100% acrylic)
Color A: Vintage – 1 skein
Color B: Jumpsuit – 1 skein
Color C: Top Stitch – 1 skein
Color D:  Khaki – 1 skein
Color E: Stonewash- 1 skein
Color F: Stovepipe – 1 skein

Scissors
Tapestry Needle
6” length of cardboard, book, or tassel maker for fringe

Final Dimensions:
Collar: 18” without drawstring
Length: 22” unstretched, not including fringe

All instructions written in US terms

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You will love love love this pattern as much as I do, it’s so fun to make and has a ton of potential for scrapbusting if you don’t feel like splurging on new yarn – made with worsted weight and designed for color changes, there is endless possibilities! Of course, I’d love to try it in monochrome too…

As usual, too much inspiration, not enough time 😛  Enjoy the rest of the silly photoshoot I did for this pattern, and I hope it inspires you too!

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I just couldn’t be more grateful for all the wonderful comments and support you guys leave me here and on social media – you’re the reason I get to keep doing this! So much love ❤

If you’d like to see more Morale Fiber, check out my social media channels:

Facebook
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Tumblr

Thank you!!
-MF

PBT: Wrap-Up

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This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Maybe it’s just because I worked on the tutorial for this so much, but this newest pixie pocket belt may be my favorite ever. To be fair though, I do say that almost every time I make a new one of these.

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That’s because every one of them turns out to be totally unique – I start out with a pile of scrap materials, and then let it be what it becomes along the way. This one became “Maple” named of course after the tree. I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial series – I certainly did – and I’d love to see what is being made from this guide!

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This pattern tutorial series is now listed on Ravelry – hook up your projects so I can see what you made, or look through other projects for inspiration  😉

And now for more pictures and ramblings.

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I especially love these to dance in, since the fabric fringe catches movement so well!

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Fun side story – the flower headpiece I am wearing in this photo is one I made years ago, a long strand of curlicues (just like the ones talked about earlier in the tutorial series) with scrap yarn flowers that made as I was traveling across the U.S.

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Of course, the utility belt function of this project is super handy if you are the festival-going type, since these pixie belts are not only cute and go over anything, but also hold your necessaries!

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I’m pretty happy with how the faux-bustle back came out – its not something I’d ever really tried before. That’s another thing I love about these projects – pure experimentation is necessary, not just encouraged.

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I’m a little sad to be closing out the pixie belt tutorial actually, so I’ve had a thought – perhaps more pocket patterns in the future? What do you think?

As always, don’t hesitate to ask any questions or leave any comments! I love hearing from you ❤

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-MF

 

 

 

PBT: Circle Pocket Part 1

Circle Pockets : Magic Rings, Continuous Circles, and Ami Shorthand

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Most of the crochet utility belts I make have circle pockets – I love their potential as a canvas for other shapes like mandalas, simple embroidery, or shell flower petals. Plus, I’m just really into circles.

The first circle for this simple circular pocket is the back part, worked continuously in the round, which is what this post is all about!

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Unless I NEED a circle with a big hole in the center, I always start my circles with a technique called the Magic Ring, an adjustable base for crochet circles that leaves no central gap. This is a really easy trick that is really magic! There are a lot of tutorials already in existence for the Magic Ring (I usually refer people to Planet June’s excellent tutorial) but here’s how I do this technique:

Magic Ring

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Take the end of the yarn strand and lay it over the fingers, the end placed on the pinkie side.

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Bring the strand under the fingers and back up over the index finger, using your bottom fingers to secure the loose end and your thumb to hold the yarn strand in place.

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Slip your hook under the bottom-most strand and wrap the top strand around the hook as for a yarn over.

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Draw up your loop through the strand under which your hook was inserted. Now you have one loop drawn up through the beginning of the ring.

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Yarn over again…

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… And draw through the loop on the hook.

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Tighten the stitch you just made. Now you have a yarn ring and a loose tail of yarn coming off of this initial stitch. For taller stitches like dc and tr, this first stitch counts as the first chain in the starting chain. For single crochet, I usually don’t count this as the first stitch as it is very tight to try to work into.

Creating a Continuous Circle:

So, once you’ve started your ring, you can start stitching the first round into it. Here’s the basic theory of crocheting flat circles: you need to increase by the same number every round to keep it flat. I start single crochet circles with 6 or 8 sts (usually 6). Which means that every round, I am going to add 6 (or 8 if I start with 8) more stitches to the total count.

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6 sc into the ring. Once you have your first round, pull the loose end of the magic circle strand to tighten the ring and close the first round.

Here I am, starting with 6, working continuously and marking my first st of every round with a stitch marker.

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End of Rnd 1

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Beginning of Rnd 2

To begin the next round, work the first stitch into the first stitch of the previous round. Place a stitch marker in the first stitch to keep track of the beginning and end of the round.

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End of Rnd 2

The first round has 6 sc, the second round has 12 sc (2 sc in each sc of the previous rnd, so I’m adding 6 to the total stitch count)

Written out, that would look something like this:

“Make Magic Ring

Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring.

Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea sc around – 12 sc”

The next round is going to add 6 sts to the total again. That means you’ll add an extra stitch (inc) to every OTHER stitch. It looks like this written out:

Rnd 3: (1 sc in the next st, 2 sc in the next st) 6 times. – 18 sc

The words in the parentheses represent a repeat, and the number outside of the parentheses represents how many times total you will repeat the instructions within.

Rnd 4: (1 sc in ea of the next 2 sc, 2 sc in the next st) 6 times. – 24 sc

That’s not that hard to type out – but I usually write things first, in a notebook. So I have a shorthand for this kind of circular crochet pattern that I use when doing long strings of shaping, such as in amigurumi style crochet, or designing circular things like my Spiral Sweater.

This shorthand is based on how many stitches you count out between increases. You start counting for every regular single crochet, then work the increase (inc), then start over counting again and repeat around. So Rounds 1-4 end up written like this – with the total st count at the end:

  1. 6 sc
    2. Inc every st – 12
    3. Inc on 2 – 18
    4. Inc on 3 – 24

“Inc on 2” means that you start counting regular sts (one…) then when you reach “two” you place an extra st. This would be placing an inc every other st.

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Inc on 2

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“Inc on 3” means you start counting regular stitches (one, two…) then when you reach “three” you place an extra st. Then starting counting over again on the next st. This would be placing an inc every 3 stitches.

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I call this notation my ami shorthand, after amigurumi of course.

BONUS: Back Loop Only Stitches

With this circle, I decided to throw in some Back Loop Only (BLO) stitches to show how it’s done on Rnd 5. So it would look like this:

  1. Inc on 4 (BLO) – 30

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Back loop only is exactly what it sounds like – insert your hook and make your stitch in only one of the two loops at the top of the stitch – the one in the back. This leaves the front loop free so you can work into it later, adding fun things like petals.

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Working BLO also leaves a pretty surface pattern from the free front loops.

Finishing Off

I took this circle up to a 60-st round total. So it would look like this written in shorthand:

Rnds 1-5 as written above
6. Inc on 5 – 36
7. Inc on 6 – 42
8. Inc on 7 – 48
9. Inc on 8 – 54
10. Inc on 9 – 60

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My circle now has a distinct hexagonal shape from placing the increases all aligned. I like to smooth the edges by ending my circles with a least one round of no increases. This also gives the pocket a little more depth. I shorthand this with the terminology “sc even” to indicate that you work one sc for each sc in the round, adding no stitches to the total for the round..

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  1. Sc even – 60

And, since we’re working continuously, that leaves us with a height difference at the end of our rounds. I finish off continuous circles with a couple of slip stitches to make a smooth edge.

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Sl st 2-3 sts, cut yarn and tie off.

In the next post I’ll make another (fancier) circle and then stitch the two together to form a pocket. But first, let’s go back to the Back Loop Only round.

Fun Ideas for Circular Pockets: Surface Shell Petals

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Since the front loops are still unworked, it’s easy to slip your hook underneath them and work something on the surface of your crochet. One of my favorite things to use these free front loops for is flower petals, such as the one in pictured here:

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To make this type of circular pocket, crochet a flat circle entirely in the Back Loop Only so that your surface on the right side is full of free front loops. Into these front loops, you can work shells like the ones demonstrated in the previous PBT post PBT: Ruffles, Shells, and Scales:

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Start by working an initial single crochet into the first free front loop, then proceed to work whatever shells you think might look pretty as petals!

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The first two shells are *1 sc, 1 hdc, 2 dc, 1 hdc, 1 sc in the next loop, then sl st in the next lp to secure. Repeating from *.

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The second two shells are *sk next loop, 2 hdc, 2 dc, 2 hdc in the next lp, sk next lp, sl st in the next lp to secure. Repeating from *.

Working an entire (continuous) circle in BLO, then using shells to fill the front loops with petals, is how I made this little silk rose pocket for my Wild Rose belt…

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And also how I made this chunky, lush rose pocket for my Garden Rose belt. As you can see, experimenting with different variables such as petal size and yarn gauge creates an amazing variety of looks even when the technique is similar!

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BUT WAIT. There’s more! Check out the next post in which we’ll crochet a multi-colored, non-continuous circle with more fun freeform techniques in PBT: Circle Pockets Part 2.

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PBT: Triangles

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Today’s task is: Triangles! I don’t personally use this shape much in my belts, but I have seen others do beautiful pixie belts with triangles featured. Speaking of inspiration, have I mentioned I’ve been creating a special Pinterest subsection on my crochet board just for pixie pocket belts? I have, and you should follow me. Anyway, here’s triangles!

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Triangle shapes can be worked either in-the-round, where you crochet your rows in a circular direction and join them before starting a new row (using increases to create points), or in regular rows, where you chain and turn to work the opposite direction after every row (this method uses decreases to shape the piece if working from the base of the shape).

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The square pocket on “Hickory” uses back-and-forth rows with decreases placed at each end of every row to shape the triangle portion.

I personally prefer the in-the-round triangle for decorative applications, because it keeps the right side facing the entire time, which to me looks prettier. I have an in-depth photo-tutorial on in-the-round triangles in my Basic Bralette free crochet pattern, so I’ll not go over the entire thing here – please refer to that tutorial for more info! And of course, I’m using bits and scraps, so I’ll change colors every row or so.

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Pattern for in-the-round Triangle:

MR (Make Ring)

Rnd 1: Ch 2 (does not count as first st), (3 dc into the ring, ch 2) 3 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 9 dc

Rnd 2: Ch 2, 1 dc into the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) repeat within parentheses twice. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 21 dc

Rnd 3: Ch 2, 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 7 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) rpt within parentheses twice. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 33 dc

(shorthand version from here on – just continue the established pattern until your triangle is the desired size!)

Rnd 4: 11 dc, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] in next space – rpt around

Rnd 5: 15 dc, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] in next space – rpt around

Etc.

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I want to make my triangle just big enough for one side to match the top of my rectangle pocket – see where I’m going with this?

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So, after I’m done, I’ll  slip stitch through the top row of the triangle and the top row of the rectangle simultaneously to join them – doesn’t matter if you don’t have exactly the matching amount of stitches, ‘cause its fReEfOrM baby! So fudging it is okay. Encouraged even.

Once that’s complete, I weave in all the ends. Now I have a rectangle pocket with a cute pointed flap to cover the top. Let’s get even fancier – or as the kids these days say, extra – by using that ruffle technology I talked about earlier in the series.

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With some handspun orange wool, I attach with a sl st a few stitches down the side of the pocket. Using a gradation of stitch heights and working about 2-3 stitches per every stitch worked into, I make a funky ruffle down the side of the pocket, ending in a couple chain stitches before fastening off. Let’s go nuts and slip a bead on there, too. And some extra yarn bits for tassel.

Then, begin on the other side (working in the opposite direction if you want the right side to be facing) and do the other side to match. Now we’re talking.

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Another word on inspiration here : this is why it’s fun for me to choose a theme for these pieces, which are always nature-based for me.  What made me decide to add that crazy ruffle? Well, for one thing, I had just a bit of that thick wool orange yarn, and bulky handspun makes great funky accent choice. But more than that, I was thinking about the Maple tree, and the way the brightly colored leaves curl as they slowly dry. The pockets so far had bright fall-like colors, but the lines were so straightforward – circle, square, rectangle – that I needed a bit of crazy curl in the pockets to kind of represent that thought of the curly maple leaf. I wasn’t going for an exact replica of the curly leaf, just a touch of the spirit of the leaf. Does that sound crazy? Good. Because this is some artistic pixie magic we’re doing. Save the logic for the office.

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In the next few posts we’ll be tackling circular pockets – stay tuned!

-MF

PBT: Square Pockets

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This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

When it comes to pouches, a square or rectangle pocket is about as easy as you can get. Squares and rectangles are just rows, back and forth, and if you can crochet you’re probably already familiar with them. Then of course there’s granny squares, which are a whole other business, but they can also be really fun in these belts. If you want a tutorial on making granny squares, check the “Part 2 Instructions” crochet portion of this free pattern on my blog.

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Here I’m just going to crochet a rectangle, then fold it in half and seam it up the sides to make a square envelope pouch. I might add fancier stuff later, but for now concentrate on the rectangle.

To start a row for a rectangle or square, chain the length you want, then chain a few extra depending on what size stitch you are making – chain 0 extra for sc (the last ch counts as your first st), chain 1 extra for hdc (the last 2 ch count as your first st), chain 2 extra for dc (the last 3 ch count as your first st) etc.

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Then, work your rows back and forth, chaining as many as necessary for the turns (1 for sc, 2 for hdc, 3 for dc, etc) – until you have a square or rectangle. Easy! I made mine a little more textured and interesting by using rows of linked half-double crochet instead of regular hdc. You can find more info on linked stitches on my free Linked Double Crochet tutorial.

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Linking stitches creates a subtle & pretty texture as well as a sturdier fabric than regular crochet.

Fold over the piece, then use crochet stitching to work through both layers at once to seam them together. Alternatively, you could thread a yarn needle with some yarn and whip stitch them together sewing-style, but I prefer the stitch method. Here I’m going to use single crochet to seam the pieces together, because I’ve decided I’m going to come back and add a funky edging later, and I’ll need something to work into easily.

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The general rule for crocheting into the edges of rows is that you’ll want as many stitches per row edge as there are chains in the turning chain for your stitch height – so for single crochet, the turning chain is 1, and you’d make 1 stitch per row edge. For hdc, the turning chain is 2, so you’d want two stitches per row edge. Keep in mind this is a GENERAL rule and it’s going to depend on your gauge and other factors – for instance, I sometimes only make 2 stitches per row side on double crochet rows, if it works better for the specific situation.

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Anyway, seam that puppy up whatever way you feel like. Weave in your ends, and you’re done! Easy pouch. Now to make it more interesting, see the next post.

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-MF