Lotus Cardigan Sleeve Free Pattern

First off, I am having a PATTERN SALE through my Ravelry store from now until June 30, 2017! Buy one pattern, get one free with the coupon code SALESTICE. Hope you are having a lovely summer so far!

Secondly, as promised, here is the FREE pattern/tutorial on attaching a cardigan-style sleeve to the Lotus Mandala Vest! I can’t stop making these in every colorway of Lion Brand’s Shawl in a Ball 🙂

The sleeve pattern shown here is also now available as an adjunct PDF when you buy the PDF for the Lotus Vest (an option available for those who want a portable file rather than having to work from the free online version). If you already have bought the pattern, you should be able to access the new PDF through your purchases.

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These instructions are for adding sleeves to the Lotus Mandala Circular Vest – the pattern is written for size small sleeves, but you can size up by skipping 1 dc in Rnd 2 instead of 2 dc and working fewer decreases throughout the pattern.

Materials:

5.5 mm hook

Lion Brand Shawl in a Ball – 3 skeins (2 for working the vest itself, 1 for adding the sleeves). Color show in Tutorial is “Prism,” color shown on model is “Peaceful Earth”

Scissors and tapestry needle for weaving in ends.

To Begin:

Work the Lotus Vest in its entirety – with or without the extra rounds before the armholes is fine (the tutorial instructions are pictured WITH the 2 extra rounds). However, if you modified the length of the armhole chain & spacing, remember that the stitch counts for adding the sleeves will not be the same.

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Rnd 1: Join yarn in between the first 2 dc’s on the chain base of the upper part of the shoulder yoke. Ch-3.

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(1 Dc in between the next 2 dc sts) 39 times.

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2 dc under the side of the next dc.

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If you worked extra rounds: 2 dc in the same chain space occupied by the dc just worked into. 2 dc in each of the next 11 ch spaces. 2 dc in the next ch space (also occupied by the dc of the armhole round). 2 dc under the side of the next dc. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 70 dc sts

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If you didn’t work extra rounds: 1 dc in the same st occupied by the dc just worked into. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. 1 dc in the next dc (also occupied by the dc of the armhole round). 2 dc under the side of the next dc. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 70 sts

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Rnd 2: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. Sk next 2 sts. (1 dc in the next st, ch 1, sk next 2 sts) 22 times. 1 Dc in the next st, join with a hdc to the 3rd ch of beg ch-4. – 24 ch spaces

For a larger sleeve, skip only one st between dc stitches in Rnd 2.

Rnd 3: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. (1 dc in the next space, ch 1) 22 times. 1 dc in the next space, join with a hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-4. – 24 ch spaces

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Rnds 4-7: Rpt Rnd 3.

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Rnd 8: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 11 times. Dc2tog over the next 2 ch spaces, ch 1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 9 times. 1 dc in the next space, join with a hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 23 spaces

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Rnd 9: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 11 times. Dc2tog over the next 2 ch spaces, ch 1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 8 times. 1 dc in the next space, join with a hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 22 spaces

Rnd 10: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 20 times. 1 dc in the next space, join with a hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 22 spaces.

Rnds 11-14: Rpt Rnd 10

Rnd 15: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 10 times. Dc2tog over the next 2 ch spaces, ch 1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 8 times. 1 dc in the next space, joing with a hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-4. – 21 spaces. – 21 spaces

Rnd 16: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 10 times. Dc2tog over the next 2 ch spaces, ch 1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 7 times. 1 dc in the next space, joing with a hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-4. – 21 spaces. – 20 spaces

Rnd 17: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 18 times. 1 dc in the next space, join with a hdc to the 3rd ch of the beg ch-4. – 20 spaces.

Rnds 18 – 34: Rpt Rnd 17.

Rnd 35: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch-1. (1 dc in the next ch space, ch 1) 19 times. Join with a sl st in the 3rd ch of beg ch-4. 20 spaces.

Rnd 36: (Sk next ch-1 space. In the next dc work 1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, 1 dc, 1 hdc. Sk next ch-1 space, sl st in the next dc.) 10 times. Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat on the other side.

Weave in all ends.

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Next color up: Moonstone! They’re addictive 😉

-MF

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Ivy Crown Free Crochet Pattern

 

 

When I first worked out my little quirky leaf motif I knew I had to make a leafy crown out of it at some point – I just couldn’t find the right yarn at the hobby stores. I wanted it to be delicate and pretty, not bulky, but the yarns I tested didn’t fit the bill.

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And then the very obvious solution hit me – use THREAD, not yarn, holding two strands together to make it bigger. Yay! So without further yammering, here’s the FREE crochet pattern for this fun leafy DIY floral crown.

Ivy Crown Crochet Pattern

 

Materials:
2.25 hook
#10 cotton crochet thread – You will need 2 cones of either the same or coordinating colors, because the pattern is worked with the 2 threads held together.

For a full photo tutorial on how to make the quirky crochet leaf, see this blog post.

  1. Grab both strands of cotton thread and form a slipknot.
  2. Ch 12.
  3. In the 3rd ch from the hook, work 4 dc.
  4. Work a ch-2 length picot in the top of the last dc.
  5. 3 hdc in the same st as the first 4 dc sts.
  6. Rotate the leaf – work 2 hdc in the same stitch but on the other side of the beginning chain (This is the quirky part – see the photo tutorial for help)
  7. Sl st in the 2nd ch of beg ch-2 on the leaf.
  8.  Sl st into the 2nd ch st from the motif on your original chain, anchoring the back of your leaf.DSCN8069
  9. Repeat from Step 2 – you can vary the spacing of the leaves by adding or subtracting chain stitches in between, as long as you have a minimum of 5 ch sts. I like to randomize the chain length at anywhere between 8-12 stitches between leaves for a subtle organic look.

I repeated 44 times, for a total of 45 leaves or 55″ in length, and made three in different colors!

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These leafy li’l guys have tons of potential:

  • twist or braid several together to create even fuller floral crowns (as seen pictured on my head)
  • add beads, charms, or little crocheted flowers
  • make shorter versions to create a choker necklace or double up the long version to make a lariat-style necklace. Like this!

I’ve got a respectable amount of crochet thread hanging around currently so I know I’ll be making more of these garlands!

-MF

 

Lotus Mandala Vest FAQ

Hi everyone! There’s been a recent surge in popularity of the free Lotus Mandala Vest pattern I designed last summer and I’ve been getting a lot of questions so I wanted to post this quick little FAQ. I have done my best to get back to everyone who  had questions (let me know if I missed you!) and I am SOOOO STOKED that you all like it so much!

Lotus Mandala Vest FAQ

Where can I get a printable PDF of this pattern?:

There is now a PDF version of this pattern, as well as a low-image printer-friendly version, available through Ravelry and Etsy. Check out the details on this blog post.

Is there a video tutorial for this pattern?:

Yes! Fellow blogger Cynthialoowho volunteered to create a video tutorial for this pattern and it is now available on her Youtube channel here. Big thanks to her for providing this awesome video so quickly for everyone who was asking for one 😀

What size does this pattern fit?:

I designed this vest to have a very loose fit, with wide armholes placed 15″ apart across the back (relaxed). The diameter across the portion of the vest with armholes is 45″. The lovely Arika is shown modeling the vest in the pictures above, and it comfortably fits her with a bust of 41″,  and a shoulder width measurement of 16″. Hopefully that gives a more accurate depiction of the sizing!

How do I make the vest bigger?:

There are several good strategies for sizing up on this pattern – and although I don’t have an exact pattern for different specific measurements, I can offer a few tips gathered from my own experience and what others have suggested:
– Make sure to take the measurement between the shoulders for the person who will be wearing it! This is how far apart to place the armholes. Smaller sizes will place the armholes closer together, larger will generally place them farther apart.
– For bigger sizes, you will probably want to add extra repeats of Rnd 29, to make sure there is a wide enough edge for the garment to drape and ruffle proportionately.
-It’s also an option to add additional rows just before the armhole round.
-You can increase the size of the armholes by simply chaining more per armhole (your stitch counts will be different, but as long as you just repeat the main pattern around, you should be good), but be sure to skip more stitches on the round below if you do.

How do I make this vest smaller/child size?:

This depends on how small you want the pattern to be. For a smaller adult/teen size, placing the armholes closer together will size the vest down, and you can also size down by using a smaller yarn weight (such as a #2 weight instead of a #4 weight) and smaller hook. However, I can’t say how well this design will work for very small children as I have not tried it. The central “lotus” motif to this vest is fairly large and might not sit well on a much smaller body – When asked about making it in child size I generally refer people to the great free pattern Ring Around the Rosie Vest from The Lavender Chair, which is similar in style and written specifically for the wee ones.

Where can I buy this vest?:

I’m not currently making these for sale, but there are some great shops on Etsy that I have seen selling this design if you search around. Fiona of MadeForYOUbyFi on Etsy has several beautiful pieces made from this pattern and has generously offered a 15% off discount of orders over $50 when you use my special code “MORALE”!

~*~

That’s it for now! I will post more common questions if they come up. Thanks so much everyone for your support!

-MF

Tribal T-shirt Fringe Choker

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Sometimes I have to burn off my excess creative energy by doing something I can finish quickly! These wild textile jewelry pieces fit the bill, especially since I’ve been trying to clean my shamefully stuffed craft storage and shredding stockpiled t-shirts is a pretty effective method for me to do that.

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This tutorial is a guide for the refashion-centric among us, and you don’t even really need to be able to crochet to make it! Only the simplest crochet stitch, the chain stitch, is necessary. It’s explained here for those who don’t know how.

There are lots of different methods for cutting t-shirt yarn, and you don’t have to cut yours the same way as shown here, but this method is featured because you can use t-shirts with lots of seams (ex: Women’s fitted t-shirts). Of course, if you want to save yourself the trouble, you could just buy some commercially produced t-shirt yarn instead!

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Materials:
1 Jersey knit cotton t-shirt, plain
9.00 mm crochet hook
Scissors

Step 1: Lay out your T-shirt and cut up the side seams  on both sides of the front and across the top. It’s okay to cut a little wonky to get extra material from the bust area below the collar, but I’ve found it’s best to keep in GENERALLY rectangle shaped.

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Step 2: Beginning with your wonky – cut side (or any side if you don’t have one) start cutting a strip about an inch in width. The goal is a thin-ish strand once you stretch the material. It can be a little more or a little less than an inch depending on the material, but be careful because if it’s too thin, it’ll break when stretched. Leave your strip attached by about an inch of uncut material.

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Step 3: Flip your t-shirt piece around and cut  about an inch to the opposite side of the uncut end. Do this 3 or 4 more times to get  a long uncut strand (for a small size) or 2-3 more times for larger t-shirts. It’s better to have more than you need than not enough, and in fact you could cut the entire piece of t-shirt material this way, but I don’t like to because cutting this way leaves tabs. Speaking of which….

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Step 4: Once you’ve got your long piece, start gently stretching your strip to curl the material to make it round and yarn-like. Use a light touch at first! Now, to deal with those tabs created by zigzagging the material. Take your scissors and round those babies off, then stretch them a little more (be careful here – rounding the corners makes the fabric thin and therefore weak to stretching). Still a little messy, but stitching will mask that.

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Step 5: Set your long strip aside – I had almost 3 yards. Now lay out your remaining rectangle of t-shirt fabric and get one inch strips straight across, shearing them completely from the main fabric so that they are individual strips. Stretch each of these strips. For a standard amount of fringe, you’ll want to have 23-26 strips, so use cut out the back piece of the t-shirt and use it for more short strips if you have to.

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If you are using commercial yarn or a continuous strip in this step, cut your strands to DOUBLE the length you want your fringe to be.

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Step 6: Grab your hook and your long strand. Leaving a tail of yarn about 10″ long, create a slipknot loop. With your hook in the loop, grab the long end of your yarn with the hook and pull it through the loop, leaving your hook in the middle of the new loop. One chain stitch made.

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Repeat until you have 25-ish chain stitches, or however long you need your chain to be to fit your neck. If you’re feeling adventurous, try using the Double Chain technique instead of the regular chain. I like to use this on the fringe chokers because it helps them lie flatter around the collarbone.

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Once you’ve completed your stitches, tie off (i.e – pull the rest of your strip out through the last loop), and leave a 10″ tail when cutting off excess yarn. If you complete your required stitches but don’t have a 10 inch tail left over, just tie it off for now. We can use a short strip to attach an adequate length of tie later.

Step 7: Finally! Fringing time! Lay out your chain. Grab some of your short t-shirt strands and double them over. You might have some that are shorter than others – aesthetically I like those to be on the outside toward the shoulders but you might not care. Anyway, double those puppies over.

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Insert your hook into the loop on the bottom of your chain or double chain, from back to front, and catch the doubled side of your strand with the hook. Pull it through so you’ve got a loop.

Now catch the loose ends of your short strand with the hook. Pull those through your loop completely. Tighten.

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Ta-Da! Now do that until you have fringed the entire choker, or at least the majority of it.

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Step 8: Attach extra ties at the end of your chain if you need to, for fastening around the neck. You could be done at this point, but I like to add a little knotwork around the top.
To add knotwork, take two adjacent pairs of fringe and separate one strand from each pair (make sure the strands are also right next to each other). Pick up both strands and tie in a simple knot. Repeat across.

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These can be used as a base for adding even wilder decorations like beads, feathers, leather strips, chains, etc… But since I’m short on time, I’ll leave those for another day!

That stylish bikini underneath the necklaces is also made from recycled materials. Check out my post, the Bindu Recycled Sweater Bikini, for more on that.

-MF

Tunisian Ripple Scarf Free Pattern

I’ve developed persistent fondness for Tunisian crochet – two of my most recent paid patterns have been in this style and I’ve recently started exploring a variety of different types of Tunisian stitching. One of those little experiments grew up to be a successful project, which I’m excited to share with you here for free!

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………..
EDIT 4/20/2017: Unfortunately the blog I reference in the following paragraph is defunct, which sucks because it was awesome. For instructions on TSS, check out this great tutorial instead. For a tutorial on Tunisian Knit Stitch, the ever-fabulous Moogly provides.
…………..

One of my favorite resources for Tunisian is My Tunisian Crochet, which has a nice collection of different stitches for this type of crochet as well as a video channel (yay!). This scarf uses Tunisian Simple Stitch to create the first row and then moves on to Tunisian Knit Stitch for the rest of the pattern.

And speaking of videos, this free pattern comes with a little video demo I put together for this scarf. I’m still at the beginning of the learning curve for making instructional videos, but my goal is to expand some of my past and future patterns by adding video tutorials to accompany the written and/or charted instructions. This video is sort of a little test run! So without further waffling, here’s the pattern.

Tunisian Ripple Scarf

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Materials:
6.5 mm Tunisian crochet hook
Any worsted weight yarn (I used Yarn Bee Soft & Sleek in Light Gray)
Tapestry needle & scissors for weaving in ends

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Ch. 39.

Row 1: In Tunisian Simple Stitch. Pick up a loop from each of the next 38 chain stitches.Work all sts back off the hook.

Row 2: In Tunisian Knit Stitch. Sk first stitch. Pick up a lp from the next 3 stitches. *Pick up a lp from the next space between stitches. Pick up a lp from the next st. Pick up a loop from the next space between stitches. Pick up a lp from the next 5 sts. Insert hook through the next 3 stitches at once and draw up one loop. Pick up a loop from the next 5 sts.* Rpt from * once more. Pick up a lp from the next space between sts, pick up a lp from the next st, pick up a lp from the next space between sts. Pick up a lp from ea of the next 3 sts. Sk next st. Pick up a lp from the final st. Work all sts back off the hook (the same way you would for Tunisian Simple Stitch!) – 39 sts

Rows 3+ : Repeat Row 2.

Repeat Row 2 until your scarf is the length you want it! I made a 75″ scarf, which used about 2 and a half skeins of my yarn (about 645 yards).

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What I ended up loving about this design is that…
a.) It has a very pretty texture on both the right side AND the wrong side
b.) It’s SO thick and cushy, and since I made this one about 2 yards long, there’s plenty of scarf there to wrap around your neck to keep the icy winds out.
c.) It’s gender neutral – my partner claimed this one for his own before it was even halfway done!

If you want more pattern goodness, you should check out my Ravelry page!

-MF

Scrappy Granny Shawl Pattern

Maybe it’s the changing of the leaves, or maybe it was the improvisational painting exercises I did in Fundamental 2-D class, but Tuesday I came home with the irresistible urge to take a bunch of colors of yarn and smoosh them all together.

As luck would have it, I started this granny square blanket  that uses a similarly chaotic approach to color around this same time last year and I had a few good sized remnants left over from it. Mixed and matched with some random solid yarns bits, I was all set to smoosh up this quick granny shawl!

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The pattern uses a simple granny blocks spaced out by lengths of chain 3’s to make it nice and drapey. The triangular pattern is easy to memorize and adjust depending on your size requirements – also it’s a superb scrap buster! And it’s free so what in tarnation are you EVEN waiting for?

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I added some slip stitch crochet cord to the ends of this beaut so you can tie it in place around your waist or neck so it doesn’t fall off your shoulders – but you can skip those if you want of course. This pattern is also available as a PDF through my Ravelry store!

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Scrappy Granny Shawl

Materials:
6.00 mm hook
Around 660 yards various #4 weight yarn (scraps are great!)
Scissors
Tapestry Needle
Cardboard or book 6″ wide – for creating tassels

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Guys, I’m really sorry about this clunky chart. I’m still in search of good chart-making software 😛

Ch. 4. Join with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Row 1: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc into the ring. Ch 1, dc into the ring.

Row 2: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 space – increase made. 3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc in the next space created by the beginning ch-4.

Row 3: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 4: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 5: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 3 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 3 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 6: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 4 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 4 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 7: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 5 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 5 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 7: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 6 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 6 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 8: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 7 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 7 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 9: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 8 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 8 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 10: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 9 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 9 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Work in pattern, always increasing at the point of the triangle, until you have worked 29 total rows – or until you run out of scraps!

BORDER ROUND

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Step 1: Attach your yarn to the corner in position to work across the flat top of the shawl. Ch 3, 2 dc in the same space. (3 dc) into the side of each double crochet or turning chain space across the top of the shawl.

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Step 2: When you reach the corner, 3 dc into the final space. Ch 2, then chain 50 (or however long you want your ties to be). Work a slip stitch into each chain stitch back down the length of the tie, leaving your original 2 chain stitches unworked. Ch another 2, then 3 dc in the same space as your last 3 dc block. Finish by working a sc in the middle dc stitch of the first 3 dc block on the next side of the shawl.

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Step 3: In the next ch-3 space, work (1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, ch-4 picot, 1 dc, 1 hdc, sc in the middle dc of the next 3 dc block). Repeat the pattern in the parentheses down the side of the shawl until you have worked the last space before the point of the triangle.

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Step 4: In the ch-3 space at the point of the triangle, work (2 hdc, 2 dc, 1 tr, ch-4 picot, 2 dc, 2 hdc, sc in the middle dc of the next 3 dc block).

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Step 5: Rpt the shell border of step 3 along the next side of the triangle until you have worked the shell repeat in the last space before your first 3 dc block of the border round. Work 3 dc in the same space as your first 3 dc block, ch 2. Ch 50 (or however much you chained for the first tie) and then slip stitch back down the tie, leaving the first 2 chain stitches unworked. Ch 2, join with a slip stitch in the first dc of step 1.

I like to add an extra row of slip stitching along the flat top of the shawl to reduce stretching!

Cut yarn and tie off – weave in all ends.

FRINGE:

Cut 4-5 strands about 12” in length. Double them over and loop through a ch-4 picot on the shell border. Repeat for each shell on the side borders of the shawl.

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I’ve been lucky enough to be personally acquainted with a number of scrappy, spunky, creative, inspiring grannies – here’s to you ladies! You rock!

-MF

Skinny Scrappy Scarf!

My lovely friends have often shown up at gatherings exclaiming “I have yarn for you!” – and this is a situation to be thoroughly enjoyed. However, I can’t always find a use for every single one of these yarns, among them long-forgotten cheap acrylics from granny’s attics, abandoned yarn sale yarn, and other orphaned skeins.

Some of these yarns have a lot more merit than others – and I try to use everything I can possibly use, because it is a rare occasion that I can bring myself to evict the yarn from the Sad Yarn Orphanarium.

However, I finally said goodbye to a huge bag full of old yarn that I just knew I wasn’t ever going to use (and actually most of it was stuff that I had bought :P) It’s slated to go to Goodwill, where it might be just the thing some other stitchmaster needs.

As a result, my yarn wall looks a lot less scary. This has virtually nothing to do with the following project. I’m just proud of myself.

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I cheated. I still have a lot of yarn that isn’t on that wall. BUT, at least I no longer fear an avalanche.

Okay, it’s not totally unrelated, because while I was cleaning I rediscovered some old handspun and some other bits and pieces that would look nice together and got inspired to create a scrap-buster project!

This little skinny scarf combines beading, crocheting, and knitting to create a unique artsy accessory that’s great for using up small lengths of yarn.

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Skinny Scrappy Scarf

Materials Needed:
20 g packet of 6/0 seed beads
1 beading needle
#10 cotton crochet thread
2.10 mm steel crochet hook
12.5 mm knitting needles
An assortment of yarn scraps, preferably 15-20+ yards each

  1. First, grab your beading needle, crochet thread, and half of your packet of beads (set the other half aside). Your amount doesn’t have to be exact. String the beads on your crochet thread.
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  2. With your 2.10 hook, start chaining the crochet thread. Every 15-20 chains (again, we’re not worried about exact numbers here) grab a bead and include it in your stitch.

    Continue beading & chaining until you run out of your first half of beads and you have a nice little beaded strand ball. Cut the thread and tie it off. You can go ahead and make a second ball from the other half of your beads now, or (if you are sick of chaining like I was) you can wait until you’re ready for it later.
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  3. Using your beaded strand and two other yarns, CO 6 sts to your 12.5 mm knitting needles using three strands.
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  4. Using all three strands, knit the next row. Purl the next row. Repeat, alternating knitting and purling and tying in new yarn strands whenever you run out of one.
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  5. Once you have your scarf almost the length you’d like (for me this was about 60″), replace one of your strands with the second beaded yarn ball and continue knitting until you run out of beaded cord. Bind off and weave in all of your ends.

I like the beaded cord because it gives the ends a nice swing-y weight! These also make pretty good handmade gifts, since they don’t take a ton of time to make.

Here in the midwest it’s getting pretty nippy outside… maybe a nice free cowl pattern is more weather appropriate for you?

-MF