Novella Shawl Pattern

The following is a ramble-y lead-up to my new FREE crochet pattern design, a super simple and warm triangular shawl with a touch of adventure – keep scrolling for the free Novella Shawl pattern or get the downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Ravelry Store or Etsy Shop now!

Backstory: Or, How Designing an Easy Shawl Pattern Led Me to Purchase a Bow and Arrow

Drama was one of my many extra-curriculars when I was in high school, although I can’t claim to have ever been any good at it. I got assigned chorus and background roles, which was fine because I had a significant amount of stage fright and I was really only there because my friends were there too.

And because I loved the costumes. Hands down my favorite part of any dramatic endeavor, and a lifelong interest since I was old enough to carry the massive Renaissance Art tome down from the bookshelf.

When I grew up and minored in Art History, I discovered 18th century actress Emma Hamilton and her “Attitudes,” ; the European celebrity would dress in costume and assume various charade poses depicting classical myths as a form of party entertainment for her esteemed friends.

This must be the Mother of Cosplay!

I have an enduring love of dress-up, responsible in no small part for the designs I publish as Morale Fiber as well as the costumes I pair them with. When creating these ensembles, I am also feeling around for a character to portray.

Sort of like an “Attitudes” style character depiction ; as I craft and plan my crochet design and the coordinating outfit, I let that Attitude take shape.

So while the shawl I had started for this was very simple and humble, the Attitude grabbed it, and demanded I make it more dramatic. At first she was just a quiet woman on a forest walk, seeking the perfect tree under which to read her book of short stories, an escape from her daily life at the shop in town.

But she turned and twisted, like the plot of a short story – upon returning, the town she remembered didn’t exist anymore. Its people wiped away from the world from a terrible sickness, and danger lurking now under every seemingly friendly face she passes on the road away from the tragedy. She needed a hood on her carefully woven covering, to shelter from unfriendly eyes, and fur trim to protect from the chill ashy winds starting to blow.

And as the ends of her neat stitching started to unravel, to become frayed and wild, so did the woman, searching for life in the twisted forest. Armed now with more strength and experience, she sets out, to find whatever good people are still left.

Im know I’m not holding the bow and arrow right, but hey, give the gal a break. She used to work at a book store, pre-apocolypse 😉

Novella Shawl Crochet Pattern

The Novella Shawl is an easy crochet pattern designed to showcase the unique texture of linked double crochet. This thick, interwoven crochet stitch calls to mind the cozy look of loom weaving while the dramatic point and slight ruffle create a tailored look that flatters. Crochet just the shawl or choose to top it off with a deep hood and fur trim for a really special piece to show off on all your woodland wanderings…

Materials

5.00 mm hook (or size needed to obtain gauge), 11.50 mm hook (for jumbo yarn fur trim, if using)

Lion Brand Ferris Wheel (#4 weight, 85 g / 270 yd, 100% Acrylic) 6 skeins  – Color shown is Imaginary Garden
Lion Brand Thick & Quick Go for Faux (#7 weight, 120 g / 24 yd, 100% Polyester) 1 skein – Color shown is Husky – optional
Scissors, tapestry needles – 1 regular, on large-eyed (for the jumbo yarn, if you are using it)
Large button (optional)

Gauge: 6 sts & 4 rows = 2” in LDC

Finished Measurements:  ~ 65 inches along top edge, ~ 35 inches from collar to tip.
Hood: ~ 16 inches deep, ~ 16 inches tall – can be a bit smaller or larger depending on how you finish & seam it.

Stitches & Abbreviations

Chain (ch)
Double Crochet (dc)
Linked Double Crochet (LDC): A special type of double crochet that links each stitch with the last stitch made. A full written tutorial on this technique can be found on my blog here. A video tutorial can be found on my YouTube channel here.
Half-Double Crochet (hdc)
St/sts – stitch /stitches

Notes:
Ch-2 at the beginning of each row does not count as the first st.
Shawl can be made to desired length by adding more or fewer rows maintaining the established increasing pattern. Ruffle edge can also be made longer or shorter by adding non-increase rows. Fur trim & hood optional.

Instructions

To begin, Ch 3.

Row 1: 9 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook.

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 LDC in the same stitch. 1 LDC in ea of the next 3 sts. 5 LDC in the next st. 1 LDC in the next 3 sts. 2 LDC in the last st. – 15 sts

Row 3: Ch 2 (does not count), turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 LDC in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 6 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 6 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 21 sts

Row 4: Ch 2 (does not count), turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 9 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 9 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 27 sts

Row 5: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 12 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 12 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 33 sts

Row 6: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 15 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 15 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 39 sts

Row 7: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 18 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 18 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 45 sts

Row 8: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 21 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 21 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 51 sts

Row 9: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 24 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 24 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 57 sts

Row 10: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 27 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 27 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 63 sts

Row 11: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 30 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 30 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 69 sts

Row 12: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 33 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 33 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 75 sts

Row 13: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 36 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 36 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 81 sts

Row 14: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 39 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 39 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 87 sts

Row 15: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 42 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 41 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 93 sts

Row 16: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 45 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 45 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 99 sts

Row 17: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 48 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 48 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 105 sts

Row 18: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 51 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 51 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 111 sts

Row 19: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 54 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 54 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 117 sts

Row 20: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 57 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 57 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 123 sts

Row 21: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 60 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 60 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 129 sts

Row 22: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 63 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 63 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 135 sts

Row 23: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 66 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 66 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 141 sts

Row 24: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 69 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 69 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 147 sts

Row 25: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 72 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 72 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 153 sts

Row 26: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 75 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 75 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 159 sts

Row 27: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 78 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 78 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 165 sts

Row 28: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 81 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 81 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 171 sts

Row 29: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 84 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 84 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 177 sts

Row 30: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 87 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 87 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 183 sts

Row 31: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 90 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 90 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 189 sts

Row 32: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 93 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 93 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 195 sts

Row 33: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 96 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 96 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 201 sts

Row 34: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 99 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 99 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 207 sts

Row 35: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 102 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 102 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 213 sts

Row 36: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 105 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 105 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 219 sts

Row 37: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 108 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 108 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 225 sts

Row 38: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 111 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 111 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 231 sts

Row 39: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 114 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 87 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 283 sts

Row 40: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 117 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 117 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 289 sts

Row 41: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 120 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 120 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 295 sts

Row 42: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 123 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 123 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 301 sts

Row 43: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 126 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 126 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 307 sts

Row 44: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 129 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 129 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 313 sts

Row 45: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 132 sts. 5 ldc in the next st. 1 ldc in the next 132 sts. 2 ldc in the last st. – 319 sts

RUFFLE:

Row 1: Ch 3 (does not count as first dc). 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in the next st, 2 dc in the next st. (1 dc in the next 2 sts, 2 dc in the next st) 105 times, or all the way across the long (pointed) bottom edge of the shawl. 2 dc in the last st. – 426 sts

Row 2: Ch 3 (does not count as first dc). 1 dc in the same st. 2 dc in the next st. (1 dc in the next st, 2 dc in the next st) 212 times, or all the way across the long edge of the shawl. – 639 sts

Rows 3-4 : Ch 3, turn. 1 dc in ea st across. – 639 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

Hood

Ch 17 (15 sts + 2 for turn).

Row 1: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 ldc in the next 13 sts, 3 ldc in the last st. Rotate to begin working down the opposite side of the foundation chain. 1 ldc in the next 14 sts. – 31 sts

Row 2: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 13 sts. 2 ldc in ea of the next 3 sts. 1 ldc in the next 14 sts. – 34 sts

Row 3: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 14 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next st, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 14 sts. – 37 sts

Row 4: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 14 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 2 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 15 sts. – 40 sts

Row 5: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 15 sts. 2 ldc in the next st.  (1 ldc in the next 3 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 15 sts. – 43 sts

Row 6: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 15 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 4 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 16 sts. – 46 sts

Row 7: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 16 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 5 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 16 sts. – 49 sts

Row 8: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 16 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 6 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 17 sts. – 52 sts

Row 9: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 17 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 7 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 17 sts. – 55 sts

Row 10: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 17 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 8 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 18 sts. – 58 sts

Row 11: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 18 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 9 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 18 sts. – 61 sts

Row 12: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 18 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 10 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 19 sts. – 64 sts

Row 13: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 19 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 11 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 19 sts. – 67 sts

Row 14: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 19 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 12 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 20 sts. – 70 sts

Row 15: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 20 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 13 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 20 sts. – 73 sts

Row 16: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 20 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 14 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 21 sts. – 76 sts

Row 17: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 21 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 15 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 21 sts. – 79 sts

Row 18: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 21 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 16 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 22 sts. – 82 sts

Row 19: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 22 sts. 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 17 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 22 sts. – 85 sts

Row 20: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 22 sts, 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 18 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 23 sts. – 88 sts

Row 21: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 23 sts, 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 19 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 23 sts. – 91 sts

Row 22: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in the next 23 sts, 2 ldc in the next st. (1 ldc in the next 20 sts, 2 ldc in the next st) 2 times. 1 ldc in the next 24 sts. – 94 sts

Row 23: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the first st. 1 ldc in each stitch across.

Rows 24-25: Rpt Row 23

If adding fur trim, follow Rnds 26 – 27. If not, add 2 more rows of 1 dc in ea st.

Row 26: Ch 2, turn. 1 hdc in the same st, ch 1, sk next st. (1 hdc in the next st, ch 1, sk next st) across. 1 hdc in the last st of the row.

Attach Faux Fur with 11.5 mm hook.

Row 27: Ch 2, 1 dc in the next space. 1 dc in each ch-1 space across.

Once the hood and shawl are complete, you may seam hood to the top of the shawl. This can be done before or after adding the fur.

To seam the hood, use locking stitch markers to align the center of the hood (the foundation chain line) with the center of the shawl (Central stitch of Row 1). Place the markers so that the hood is evenly held against the fabric.

Using a length of your main yarn and a tapestry needle, sew the edge of the hood to the edge of the shawl.

Once the hood is seamed and the fur trim is added, use a large-eyed yarn needle to thread the faux fur yarn. Weave in the ends, securing the top of Row 27 to the edges of the shawl so that it transitions smoothly.

Weave in any remaining ends, and add a button to fasten at the collar if you prefer! The holes in row  26 make excellent natural buttonholes or tie-holes – or you could add a chain-loop closure instead. Once this is finished, you’re all done and ready for adventure!

Whatever the character, one thing remains true throughout all photoshoots – I’m either pretending to be freezing in scorching weather, or pretending to be scorching in freezing weather 😉

And then there’s the cliff-perching.

-MF

Foundation Tunisian Stitch

Let’s jump right in today because it’s going to be a quick one! If you’re a human who crochets, odds are good that you don’t LOVE working into the bothersome stitches of a foundation chain. I know I don’t.

So when I needed a technique that would allow me to add length to the end of a forward pass row in Tunisian crochet, I fiddled until I got what I wanted: A Tunisian version of foundation crochet, which works the bottom stitches and the first row of stitches simultaneously.

No long twisty strands. No chaining and rejoining. AND it helps keep the bottom from curling!

Here is my video of this technique, the first of what I hope is many Tunisian tutorial videos – use the Foundation Tunisian Stitch as the base for your Tunisian crochet pieces by working FTS instead of the base chain and first row, or use it to add length on Tunisian pieces easily ❤

For more Tunisian tutorials, peep the links below the video!

Tunisian Simple Stitch Tutorial

Tunisian Knit Stitch Tutorial

Tunisian Simple Stitch – Increases and decreases

Thanks for visiting! ❤

-MF

Kismet Poncho

Sometimes I think I’m a really slow designer compared to other crochet artists out there! When I dream up an idea, and hone it down, it may still be months before I perfect it and apply it to a project satisfactorily, and then more time still to sculpt the pattern and create the materials to teach it.

The Kismet Square was originally created for an entirely different design, one that I still have my eye on for the future – but that pattern was taking way too long!

So I settled on creating a simpler garment featuring the Kismet Square, and doing a full-length crochet pattern tutorial video for both the squares and for assembling & completing a poncho from them!

The entire Kismet Poncho pattern can be accessed for FREE exclusively on my YouTube channel videos (with written captions) or get the written pattern with tutorial photos as a downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store! ❤ Keep scrolling for the free video ❤

It’s not the project I originally intended, but it’s the perfect project for the upcoming autumn weather and the perfect addition to my YouTube free pattern offerings – so the Kismet Poncho was born, and it was… well… fate 😉

The Kismet Poncho features a 12-round crochet square with a floral circular focal point that expands outward into easy repeat rows of stitches, clusters and shells. The alternating solid and openwork stitches create a boldly textured appeal inspired by the rich layered patterning of Middle Eastern decorative traditions.

Worked in various colors of sleek #4 worsted weight yarn, this one-size-fits-all poncho uses 4 squares to create a gorgeous statement piece with or without fringe. The pattern itself is easy to adapt with different yarn and hook sizes, and the rounds of varied stitching showcases any range of color combinations you can dream!

Finished Measurements:

Length – 30” collar to tip, not including fringe, 20” collar to short edge, not including fringe
Width – 45” across from short edge to short edge

Materials:

5.5 mm hook
#4 weight Acrylic Yarn (I used a blend of yarns, all acrylics such as Caron Simply Soft and Lion Brand Heartland) – ~ 800-900 yds
Scissors
Tapestry Needle
6” book or length of cardboard for cutting fringe

Now on to the videos! Find Gauge, stitches, and pattern notes below the first video ❤

Kismet Poncho Part 1

Keep scrolling for Parts 2 & 3!

Gauge: 3 sts & 1 row = 1” in dc

Stitches & Abbreviations:
Chain (ch)
Double Crochet (dc)
Slip Stitch (sl st)
Half Double Crochet (hdc)
Treble Crochet (tr)

Special Stitches:
Magic Ring: An adjustable ring made by wrapping the yarn around the hand or fingers, and using the loop to crochet the first round of a circular crochet piece. Ring is closed by pulling the loose tail tightly after completing the round.
Shell: A set of 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc in the same space.
Petal: A series of hdc, dc, tr, arranged in a mirrored shape within a single stitch or space.
Cluster: Several stitches worked in the same st or space, leaving the last loops on the hook. When all stitches are worked, YO and pull through all loops on the hook.
Dc3tog: A decrease where 1 dc is worked in each of the next 3 indicated stitches, leaving the last loop on the hook for each dc stitch. The complete the stitch, YO and draw through all remaining loops on the hook. 1 dc3tog made.

Abbreviations
Skip (sk)
Next (nxt)
Each (ea)
Space (sp)
Stitch (st)
Beginning (beg)

Kismet Poncho Part 2

Kismet Poncho Part 3

I hope this design inspires you to create something you or your friends & family will love! And if you have any questions whatsoever, please don’t hesitate to contact me here or via any of my social media channels 🙂

Peace!

-MF

Video Game Guy Backpack Tutorial

Let’s say for the sake of imagination that there’s a story featuring an adventurous youth and his acerbic canine best friend, who live in a slightly macabre and trippy video game world and have adventures. We’ll call it “Adventuring Friends.”


I think that in that world, they’d probably have a sentient portable video game console. We’ll call him Video Game Guy and he’s definitely not based on anything that is trademarked 😉
Wouldn’t it be cute to crochet a backpack featuring this colorful companion? I think so too. Let’s do it! (P.S – I got this idea originally from Instagram crochet artist @mioforestcrochet and made my own version- please check her out and give her some likes!)


I hope you enjoy this free crochet tutorial for the Video Game Guy Backpack! I’ve included all of my notes, and as much bonus info as I could capture – if you have any questions on how I did any of the steps, please don’t hesitate to ask ❤

Update!: This design now has a Ravelry project Page, if you want to favorite it & save for later ❤

Video Game Guy Tutorial

This tutorial covers the instructions for making all the pieces of the Video Game Guy Backpack, but you can easily use this pattern to create a stuffed friend or pillow out of him, too!

Materials:
I Love This Cotton! (#4 weight, 100% cotton, about 150 yds per skein) 2 skeins in light blue and 1 skein in teal
Assorted scrap yarn colors: Lighter blue for the screen (I held in a strand of Glow-in-the-Dark yarn as well, to make the screen glow. I got that yarn from here, years ago). I also used scrap red, yellow, green, and dark blue for the buttons, and black for the accents.
Scrap fabric (optional)
Safety eyes (optional)
Button
Scissors, Tapestry needle, and locking stitch markers (for assembly)

Hook: 3.5 mm hook
Gauge: Not critical. Should be tight, as you don’t want a very hole-y fabric.

Special Stitches: Linked Double Crochet (LDC) – get the free tutorial from my blog here.
Magic Ring (MR): A great tutorial from Planet June here
Notes: I use Ch 2 to turn on the rows of linked double crochet instead of the traditional 3-chain turn, I find it works better with my gauge on this project – you can substitute 3 if it works better for you! 🙂

Instructions

Front & Back (Make 2, 1 front 1 back, in light blue)

Ch 37.

Row 1: 1 Dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 LDC in ea of the next 34 sts. – 35 sts
Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 34 sts.
Rows 3-27: Rpt Row 2.

If you are making the Front rectangle,
Cut yarn and tie off.
If you are making the Back rectangle and you want a fold-over flap with a loop, continue on in pattern for 7 more rows, placing a chain loop of stitches in the middle of the last row (skip the chain loop if you are making a pillow or stuffie). I wanted the loop more on the inside (showing the button less) so I made the loop on the second to last row, and then crocheted over that row with the loop held on the inside, out of the way.

Side (1 continuous piece, in teal)
Ch 12.
Row 1: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 LDC in ea of the next 9 ch sts. – 10 sts
Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 9 sts.
Rows 3-77: Rpt Row 2.
Cut yarn and tie off.
Compare the side strip to your front and back panels. It should have enough rows to match all the way around the 3 sides of the front & back rectangles, with plenty of room to turn the fabric at the corners. You can adjust the number of side rows here if needed.

Screen Face (Make 1, lighest blue, white, or preferred color – I held 1 strand of glow yarn in with the regular cotton light blue):
Ch 24.
Row 1: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 LDC in ea of the next 21 sts. – 22 sts.
Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 21 sts. – 22 sts
Rows 3-12: Rpt row 2.
SC border: Ch 1, rotate. Work 2 sc in the side of every LDC row-end, making 3 sts in each corner to turn. 1 sc in each st across the bottom (the foundation chain), making 3 sts at the corner to turn. 2 sc in the side of every LDC row-end. Stop at final corner.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Here’s a picture of his face glowing! Sorry for the terrible image quality here. But it does glow!

Arms (Make 2, light blue)
MR.
Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring. Tighten.
Rnd 2: 1 sc in ea of the next 6 sc – 6 sts.
Rnds 3-18: Rpt Row 2
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Legs (Make 2, teal)
MR.
Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring. Tighten.
Rnd 2: (1 sc in the next sc, 2 sc in the next sc) rpt around – 9 sts
Rnd 3: 1 sc in ea of the next 9 sc. – 9 sts
Rnds 4-12: Rpt rnd 3.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Arrow Pad (Make 1, yellow)
MR
Rnd 1: Ch 2( does not count as first dc). Dc 12 into the ring. Tighten. Join with a sl st in the first dc of the round.
Rnd 2: *Ch 3. Dc in the same stitch. 2 dc in the next st. 1 dc in the next st. Working down the side of the last dc stitch made, slip stitch 2 toward the round below. Work 1 sl st in the same stitch of the round below. Sl st in the next free dc. Rpt from * 3 more times to form all 4 arrow directions.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Red & Green Button (Make 1 each)
My green yarn was small, so my green button was naturally smaller as I would imagine a Video Game Guy to have a smaller green button than red button 😉 But you can substitute hdc’s for dc’s to make the green button smaller if your yarn is the same weight as the rest!
MR
Rnd 1: Ch 2, 12 dc into the ring, tighten. Sl st in the first dc to join.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Blue Button (Make 1)
My blue yarn is small, so my blue button is small – you can substitute hdc’s for the dc’s and sc’s for the hdc’s to make the button smaller, if you are using the same weight yarn 🙂
MR.
Rnd 1: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc). (3 dc into the ring, 3 hdc into the ring) 3 times. Join with a sl st in the first dc of the round.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Straps:
I forgot to note how many stitches long my straps were, but I ended up making them too long anyway so that’s that 😛 So here’s a short description (skip the straps if you’re making a pillow or stuffie) :
Chain a length equal to the length you want your straps, or slightly under (a lot of weight will stretch them some).
Row 1: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 LDC in every other stitch across.
Row 2: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 LDC in every other stitch across.
Repeat for as many rows as you want to get the width of your strap. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Black Details:
Chain small lengths, single crochet back down the chains. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Lining (Fabric, optional)
I wanted to make my Video Game Guy pretty sturdy (sturdy enough to house an actual portable game console) so I decided to line the inside of the backpack with fabric to reinforce it. I used scrap fabric and just traced my main pieces (the front side and the side rectangle) onto the fabric to get my shapes.

I used my serger for quick construction (it’s ugly, but it’ll mostly be hidden).

And added a channel at the top of the lining for a drawstring, because hey. I’m fancy. I used my regular sewing machine for that part.

Assembly

Using a bunch of locking stitch markers, line your side piece so it runs all the way around both sides of the Front & Back rectangle, with plenty of space at the corners.

Using light blue yarn, join at one end of the Side. To create a seam, work through 2 layers of crochet fabric at once. Single crochet down the side, working 2 single crochet per row-end, under the sides of the LDC stitches at the edge.

If you prefer, you could just use a tapestry needle and yarn to sew it together, but I think the single crochet seam creates a sturdy shape and a crisp edge and is worth the extra patience required!

When turning a corner, work 5 sc into the corner stitch to keep the corner sharp. Continue to work 2 sc into the sides of each LDC row end on the Side, but remember to keep 1 sc per CHAIN stitch on the Front rectangle, as you will now be working across the bottom of the foundation chain on the Front rectangle since you’re working the short side.

Continue on to turn another 5-sc corner and finish the seam up the other long side, leaving one short side (the one with the flap) un-seamed and open.

Repeat this process to seam on the back side.

At this point, weave in any ends on all of your extra pieces that AREN’T going to be used to sew the piece on. Don’t forget like me and accidentally weave in the long yarn tails used for your sewing threads 😀

For the screen face, place your safety eyes or other form of face-making onto the screen before sewing it on to the front of the backpack. I left the top of the screen open and un-seamed, for use as another small pocket:

I then added the arms and legs, unstuffed, by carefully seaming the top opening onto the flat side piece surfaces.

Next came aaaaaaalll the surface details: Arrow Pad, Colored Buttons, and black details are all seamed onto the surface of the front piece using the yarn tails and tapestry needle.

The final hurdle to jump before I finished the piece was the straps. Now, as I mentioned earlier, I made the straps too long. Possibly because I underestimated how much they would stretch, or possibly because I was just wrong 😀

Regardless, I used locking stitch markers to test-place the straps, inserting more strap on the inside of the backpack if I needed to shorten it more. Since mine is getting a lining anyway, it won’t matter if there’s a little extra strap poking around in there.

Once they were arranged to my liking, I used the tapestry needle and the remaining yarn tails to sew them into place on the top and bottom. After messing around a little more with the flap and straps, I was ready insert my lining.

I have said it before and I’ll say it again – it’s really scary to place something you’ve lovingly stitched for hours with your hook and soft yarn, right into the gaping maw of the stabby-stabby machine. But the more I sew on crochet, the more I get used to it and the more I learn, so away I went! Stabby Stabby!

I sewed reinforcement stitching on the straps, and sewed all along the top rim of the backpack with a straight stitch, keeping an eye on my tension settings. I also added a round button on the inside front of the bag, so the top flap would button down but the button wouldn’t show on the face of the Game Guy.

Lastly, I added the drawstring. Exceedingly happy with my project, I hastened to type up this tutorial so that others might make their own Video Game Guy! This special piece is going to my friend for her birthday ❤

I hope you enjoy making this project, and maybe try out different versions – a simplified project might be to make a stuffed friend or pillow out of VGG! Or even a smaller patch version? ❤

If you liked this free tutorial and want to show off your project, Morale Fiber has a pretty kick-butt Facebook Group now with ALL KINDS of awesome fantasy, boho, hippie, nerdy, and alternative crochet projects shared by fiber fans ❤ Check it out and see if you’d like to join us here!

-MF

Hedge Witch Hat PDF

No sooner than I released the totally-free crochet pattern for the Hedge Witch Hat, did I realize I wanted to add some tweaks to the general shape of it! Typical of me really – I’ve never once put out a pattern that I didn’t want to keep modifying in some way. Unfortunately, not matter how finicky I get, I could always keep changing a bit here and a bit there, and so at some point I just have to commit and get it done with.

The lovely Sarina modeling her custom Hedge Witch Hat!

After all, I can come back to it later. Which is exactly what I’ve done with here! In this case the design modifications are minor – I wanted the silhouette to be a LITTLE more curved and forward-set.

Because the two variations are similar but each with it’s own charm, I couldn’t decide which I liked better – so the pattern update includes the instructions for BOTH varieties!

You can get the updated, totally free version of this easy and cute crochet pattern on my blog via the original post.

The new version is also getting the spiffy PDF treatment – so now the entire updated pattern is available as a purchaseable, downloadable, ad-free PDF!

Get the PDF crochet pattern now through my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store!

Paid patterns make up the vast majority of my business income so if you like this pattern and want to use it more in the future, please consider supporting me by buying the paid version. And of course, more support means more great Morale Fiber designs in the future 😉

Sharing my art is my passion and I couldn’t do it without you ❤ Read on for more info on the Hedge Witch Hat PDF!

This quick, easy, and stylish little witch hat is not just a cute version of a Halloween favorite – it may just charm its way into your everyday wardrobe! Great made with any #4 worsted weight acrylic yarn, this simple design comes in two style options with plenty of room for customizing with color or adorable add-ons like flowers or patches.

Worked in half-double crochet, this pattern utilizes a special technique to keep the seam straight called the Switchback Join – instructions and tutorial link are included in the written pattern along with lots of the usual features – clear tutorial photos, step-by-step directions, stitch counts, and all the details you need to make this quick project!

Materials:
3.75 mm hk
#4 weight yarn – Approximately 200-250 yds
Scissors & tapestry needle

Gauge: 4 sts & 3 rows – 1” in hdc

Finished measurements: ~ 25″ on the inside, 36″ brim on the outside, 9-10″ height

Types: A (Pointier, black & dark gray versions), B (Rounder, light gray and tan versions)

All instructions are in English in U.S terminology.

I’m already plotting some crochet patches to put on these babies – perhaps a Crochet Patch pattern series is in order, no? 🙂 I have a couple good candidates already! Follow the links below for more Free Patterns:

At the center of the Embla Vest (pictured above) is the Tree of Life motif, which you can get for free on my blog and would make a great patch!

I’ll probably do a little crescent moon on the hat I’m working on now, which is navy and blue. You can get the instructions for the Crescent Moon motif where it appears as part of my other free pattern, the Forest Guide Hat.

Happy Casting!

-MF

Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial

One of the very first things I tried my hand at when I began crafting more complex crochet projects was the bikini top. It seemed like such a doable project, in a relatively short amount of time, and for great rewards – something totally cute to wear that I MADE!

Well, once I started I never did stop trying variations of these, and I became fascinated with the different ways these comfortable and fun projects could be shaped. I followed other patterns, looked at charts and countless examples on Pinterest, and made many of my own including some for which I formed specific designs and published as PDFs!

(Pictured above: The Basic Bralette)

But it was the popularity of the Basic Bralette Tutorial that spurred me to finally create a general Bikini Cup tutorial. Much like with the bralette design, the Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial is meant to be a jumping-off pattern from which you can experiment with your own unique variations.

For the Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial, we’re going to give a bunch of examples and show how cup shape and size can be modified by varying stitch height and increases.

Hopefully this is a good overview useful for both seasoned crocheters as a quick reference and for newbies who don’t know where to start. If you like this tutorial and want to save it, give it a fave on the Ravelry design page!

I’ve included photos, written instructions, AND how-to videos with examples of the strategies used to create one-of-a-kind halter tops and bikinis out of these customized cups ❤ I hope you love!

Check out these other halter top patterns from Morale Fiber or keep scrolling for the FREE Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial!

Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial

Notes:

-Cups are worked by stitching up one side of the foundation row, increasing at the peak (or end) and stitching down the other side. These rows are turned and worked back and forth, placing the increases at the central top for every row.
-First row counts as the foundation row, not Row 1 – be careful when counting your rows. I find it easiest to count by the number of increases.
-Beginning chain does not count as first stitch
-Cups can be worked to desired size by adding rows that maintain the established pattern
-Cups can be put together in a multitude of ways – crochet around them and experiment with inventing unique halters of your own – I tried to include lots of inspiration photos!
-The following includes the pattern of three basic size/shape options, which illustrate the different ways to modify size. Mix and match the strategies as shown to create a custom fit ❤
-Find video tutorial instructions on creating your own unique halter below the written patterns & check out the examples provided throughout! 🙂

Size and shape are determined by manipulating the following factors:


1. Stitch height: Here I’m working with single crochet (sc), half double crochet (hdc) and double crochet (dc)
2. Foundation Length: The number of stitches that make up the central row to be stitched around. I stick within the range of 10-15 normally but it can be any amount.
3. Increase Style: Increases are placed at the central peak of the cup – here I’m either adding +4 stitches per row (2 stitch, 1 chain, 2 stitches increases – where the chain does not count) or +2 stitches per row (1 stitch, 1 chain, 1 stitch increases).
4. Number of Rows: How many rows of stitching are made.

I make a few size recommendations below each cup – but just be aware that you can make any of these to any size desired, depending on how you finish them.

Single Crochet Cups

Stitch: SC
Foundation #: 10
Increases: (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc)

Ch 11 – (10 chain stitches for the foundation stitches, + 1 extra for the turn)

Foundation Row: Sk first ch st, 1 sc in the 2nd ch from the hook and in each of the next 9 ch sts. – 10 sc

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first sc), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 9 sts. In the end of the foundation row, working into the 1 ch st left over from the foundation, work (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc). Rotate the row so as to work down the opposite side, into the initial foundation chain (working the bottom loops). 1 sc in ea of the next 10 sts. – 22 sc

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 10 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 11 sts. – 24 sc

Row 3: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 11 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 13 sts. – 26 sc

Row 4: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 12 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 14 sts. – 28 sc

Row 5: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 13 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 15 sts. – 30 sc

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 14 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 16 sts. – 32 sc

You can continue on in this pattern for as many rows as you like, maintaining the same method of increasing in the central ch-1 and working 1 stitch in every other stitch.

Above: Two single crochet style cups. Left – Foundation 10 sts, +2 / (1sc, ch 1, 1 sc) increases.
Right – Foundation 5 sts, +4 / (2 sc, ch 1, 2 sc) increases.

I worked the SC, +4 increase style cup for 9 rows to make the top shown below. This pattern makes a very small, flat cup and is appropriate for A cup sizes.

And Sc, +2 increases and 9 rows to make this top – I recommend this cup for A-B size busts.

Half Double Crochet Cups

Stitch: HDC
Foundation #: 10
Increases: (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc)

Pictured Above, from left to right:
1. HDC, Foundation 10 sts, +2 / (1 hdc, ch 1, 1 hdc) increases.
2. HDC, Foundation 15 sts, +2 (1 hdc, ch 1, 1 hdc) increases.
3. HDC, Foundation 10 sts, +4 (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) increases.

Ch 12 – (10 chain stitches for the foundation stitches, + 2 extra for the turn.)

Foundation Row: Sk first 2 ch sts. 1 hdc in the 3rd ch from the hk and in ea of the next 9 ch sts. – 10 hdc.

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 9 sts. In the end of the foundation row, working into the side of the 2 chains left over from the foundation, work (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc). Rotate the row so as to work down the opposite side, into the initial foundation chain (working the bottom loops). 1 hdc in ea of the next 10 sts. -24 hdc

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 11 hdc. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 12 sts. – 28 hdc

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 13 sts. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 14 sts. – 32 hdc

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 15 sts. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 16 sts. – 36 hdc

Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 17 sts. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 18 sts. – 40 hdc

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 19 sts. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 20 sts. – 44 hdc

You can continue on in this pattern for as many rows as you like, maintaining the same method of increasing in the central ch-1 and working 1 stitch in every other stitch.

Cups made with either +2 increases or +4 increases in HDC are my all-purpose cup pattern. They really do well with most bust sizes, have good proportional qualities, and are a good place to start if you don’t know your preferred size exactly.

In this YouTube video, I show how to work the HDC, +4 increase style step by step – but it’s a good example of the techniques no matter what stitch and increase combo you use! Check it out:

I used HDC, +4 increases to make this top:

The crocodile stitch scale portion that I worked onto the bottom of the cups is from my Feather & Scale Halter Top crochet pattern! 🙂

Double Crochet Cups

Stitch: DC
Foundation #: 15 (+2)
Increases: (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc)

Pictured Above: 1. (Top) – DC, Foundation 15 sts, +4 / (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) increases.
2. DC, Foundation 5 sts, +4 / (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) increases.

Ch 17 – (15 for the foundation sts, + 2 to turn)

Foundation Row: Sk first 2 ch sts. 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hk and in ea of the next 14 ch sts. – 15 dc.

Row 1: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts. In the end of the foundation row, working into the side of the 2 chains left over from the foundation, work (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc). Rotate the row so as to work down the opposite side, into the initial foundation chain (working the bottom loops). 1 dc in ea of the next 15 sts. – 34 dc

Row 2: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 17 sts. – 38 dc

Row 3: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. – 42 dc

Row 4: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. – 46 dc

Row 5: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. – 50 dc

Row 6: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. – 54 dc.

You can continue on in this pattern for as many rows as you like, maintaining the same method of increasing in the central ch-1 and working 1 stitch in every other stitch.

I used the DC, +4 increases style cups with the 5-stitch foundation length to make this bikini! DC stitch cups get wider faster (because of stitch height) and are therefore a great choice for fuller busts.

DC, +4 increases with a foundation length of 15 makes a much bigger cup, as you can see in this halter top (I’m a B-ish cup but it could easily fit a larger chest)

Finishing Your Bikini

There are a lot of different strategies for completing a crocheted top once both bikini cups have been made. First, you’ll need to attach them, which I usually do by crocheting across the bottom of one cup, then directly onto the bottom of the other as one row.

From there, you can crochet rows off the side, work in rounds, add straps, and create other features such as decorative stitching an added motifs. Here’s some side views of completed tops to show the bands and straps:

The video demo below shows how to crochet a bottom band to attach the cups, as well as some of my strategies for creating a finished top including creating bands and straps. I also show in more detail the types of finishings on the tops pictured above 🙂

By utilizing the different lengths of foundation stitch, stitch height, and number of increased stitches, this style of bikini cup can be made exactly as you like! I hope this tutorial and explanation is useful, and if you have specific questions be sure to leave a comment! ❤

Thanks – and don’t forget to get out (safely) into the sunshine!

-MF

Teddy Bear Onesie

The craze for animal-themed full-body pyjamas here in America has mostly passed my wardrobe by, but I have to admit that when I saw a fuzzy, teddy bear version with shorts and a hood while online shopping I thought it would look awefully cute.

The problem was that the product was on one of those cheap knockoff websites, you know, the same kind that steal images from independent artists like me and use the picture to sell terrible swill. So even if I could order a product that would actually fit my body (I checked the measurements chart – I couldn’t) I probably wouldn’t receive anything I’d actually want to wear.

So I thought to myself, as I very often do: “I could probably crochet that.”

And the next time I was in the Bad Yarn Buying Place, lo and behold I did find the absolute perfect yarn to imitate the garment I wanted. I decided to create what I wanted for me, and then document the process and offer it as a free tutorial here! Crappy companies steal from me and make money, so I’m stealing from crappy companies and giving back to you. And hopefully making some money. 😉 (Speaking of which, have you seen my new Tip Jar?)

I intend to create a more comprehensive pattern for this in the future, with more detailed stitch counts and size options, but for now a description of my math and a photo tutorial with written instructions for the size I made (small) should get you started! If you make it I’d love to see – I have a Facebook Group for sharing crochet projects and we’d love to have you!

Keep scrolling for the FREE tutorial! If you want to save it for later, give it a fave on the Ravelry Pattern Page.

Materials & Notes:

Red Heart Hygge Fur (#5 Bulky, 7 oz/200 g, 260 yds – color shown is “Smokey) – 6 skeins
6.00 mm crochet hook
Buttons – I used 5/8ths inch buttons but next time I would choose inch buttons as they ended up being a little small
Ribbon or tie for the waist (optional) – I used an acyrlic mesh ribbon yarn
Scissors & tapestry needle
Measuring tape (comes in handy)

Gauge: 6 sts & 4 rows = 2″ (I measured gauge carefully but all other measurements given for schematics, fit, etc are approximated with measuring tape with the garment laid flat 🙂 )

Notes: As mentioned in my demo video (link below), this pattern utilizes a yarn that makes the stitches very hard to see – so I recommend keeping good note of your stitch counts and rows! I didn’t always exactly do that, but the good news is, it’s also really easy to fudge it on this project 😛

If you’re customizing your own size working from my tutorial, you may want to keep the Craft Yarn Council Standard Sizes page handy 🙂

Video Demo for working this yarn can be found here on my YouTube Channel.

Stitches Used:
Ch – chain
hdc – half double crochet
fpdc – front post double crochet
bpdc – back post double crochet
hdc2tog – half double crochet 2 together – also known as a decrease (dec)
sc – single crochet
sl st – slip stitch
MR – magic ring

Instructions

Shorts

To begin, Ch 85. Join in the first ch of the round with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first dc.) 1 hdc in every stitch. Join with a slip stitch in the first hdc of the round. – 85 sts.

Rows 2 – 20: Rpt Row 1.

Cut yarn and tie off. You’ll have a 10″ long tube, about 28″-30″ in circumference. This is most of the shorts. Next, we’ll add a small flat panel to the bottom to define the crotch and leg area.

Panel

Ch 7.

Row 1: 1 hdc in the 2nd ch from the hook. 1 hdc in ea of the next 5 ch sts. – 6 hdc.

Rows 2-10: Ch 1 (does not count). 1 hdc in every stitch. – 6 sts.

Cut yarn and tie off. Position the insert in the middle of the shorts, with one short edge against the edge on one side, and the opposite sides match the same way in the middle on the other side. Sew on the panel after checking there is an even amount of stitches left open on either side of the panel, for the legs.

I had 37 sts left free on either side for mine. I had 85 sts total for the waist, so minus the 6 sts on either side (12 total) I would have 73 remaining total. 73 / 2 = 36.5, but I’m fudging and saying 37 for simplicity’s sake. Things are fuzzy enough that 1/2 stitch estimate isn’t going to matter 😉

Pictured above: shorts laid flat after panel is added. Also you can see my reflection.

Once the insert is placed, each leg hole will have rows added to lengthen the bottom of the shorts.

Shorts – Legs instructions
Row 1: Hdc in each hdc around, placing decreases at the corners were the insert meets the upper shorts. 1 hdc in the side of each row of the insert when working across.

Rows 2-4: 1 hdc in ea stitch around. I ended up with 42 stitches, I think I placed a couple extra decreases. Check the fit to find the right amount for you 🙂

Once the rows for each leg are added, cut yarn and tie off. Shorts portion complete!

Upper Body

Belt Rib:

Locate the center stitch of the front portion of the shorts (this could be either side at this point – the shorts are identical front to back). You can do this by counting, measuring, counting up from the center of the insert, whatever. I eyeballed it carefully. We are now going to work 3 rows of post double crochets (you can find a tutorial for Post Stitches here on my blog if you don’t know how), to add some texture and a belt-loop placement for the hips.

Join new yarn at this center stitch on the top edge, working into Row 1 of the shorts. Ch 2 – does not count as first double crochet.

Row 1: 1 FPDC in the same stitch. 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) around. Join with a slip stitch in the first st. – 85 sts

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count). 1 FPDC in the next FPDC, 1 BPDC in the next BPDC. – 85 sts

Row 3: Rpt Row 2.

Do not tie off. For the next portion of the body, we continue working but stop joining the rounds at the end – instead we will be working back and forth in rows. This creates a front opening for the garment.

Pictured above: Post stitch rib rounds completed, with the first few rows of back- and – forth hdc added.

Torso

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in every stitch. – 85 sts

Next, mark 1 point at each side of the torso – the place that falls at either hip. We will decrease at each of these points over the next two rows.

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in ea st around until reaching the marked stitch. 1 hdc2tog (dec) over the marked stitch and the next st – place marker. 1 hdc in ea st around until reaching the 2nd marker. 1 hdc2tog (dec) over the marked st and the next st – place marker. 1 hdc in ea of the remaining sts – 83 sts.

Row 3: Repeat Row 2 – 81 sts.

Row 4: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in ea st around.

Rows 5- 20: Rpt Row 4.

Top Panels – Front

Now that biggest part of the upper body is build onto the shorts, we’ll fit the shoulder area. This will depend a little on how big you need your armholes – larger arms will need to leave a few more stitches unworked and/or make the panels slightly longer.

First, take two stitch markers and find the middle of each side of the garment (find by counting back from the split). Mark these two stitches as references.

For size small, I’m marking out a section 4-5 stitches inward from the front split on either side, and 4-5 sts inward from the side marker at either side. For my size the front panels will be 12 sts or ~4″ in width. Mark where you want your panels. Attach yarn at any of the markers.

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count) 1 hdc in the same stitch. 1 hdc in ea stitch across. – 12 sts.

Rows 2-15: Rpt Row 1.

Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat on the other side of the front, counting 4-5 stitches inward of the front split in the opposite direction.

Pictured above: Both 12-stitch long front panels completed. You can also see the completed back panel behind those, which we are about to tackle…

Top Panel – Back

For the back top panel, count again 4-5 stitches inward from the marked stitch on either side and place a marker for this area. Mine was 35 stitches in width, about 11.5-12″.

Row 1: Attach yarn at marked area. Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea stitch across. – 35 sts.

Row 2: Ch 1, 1 hdc in ea st across. – 35 sts.

Rows 3-15: Rpt Row 2.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Pictured above: Back top panel, complete

Sleeves

Match the top edges of the front and back panels so that the outer edges of the front panels are aligned with the outer edges of the back panel.

With a yarn and tapestry needle, sew a seam across the top edges, matching each stitch together, with a whip stitch. Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat for other shoulder seam.

Pictured above: Shoulders with seams marked

With the stitch markers, mark where the seam you just sewed is located on either side.

Round 1: Attach yarn at the bottom of the sleeve, in the center of the unworked spaces at the armpit. Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea of the next sts around the entire sleeve, moving the marked stitch’s marker to the stitch above it as you work.

Rnd 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea of the next sts around until reaching the marked stitch at the shoulder. 1 hdc2together over the marked stitch and the next st – move marker to stitch just made. 1 hdc in ea of the remaining sts. Join with a sl st in the first hdc of the round. – 36 sts.

Pictured Above & below: First three rounds with marker moved

Rnd 3: Rpt Rnd 2. – 35 sts.

Rnds 4 -32: Ch 1 (does not count). 1 hdc in every st around. Join with a sl st. – 35 sts.

Rnd 33: Ch 2 (does not count as first double crochet). 1 FPDC in the same st. 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) around. Sk last st if your total sts are not an even number ( this also makes a good thumbhole if your sleeves are long enough). – 34 sts.

Rnds 34-35: Repeat round 33.

Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat for other side’s sleeve.

Hood

Row 1: Ch 21. Hdc in the 2rd ch from the hook and in ea of the next 17 ch sts. 2 hdc in the next ch st. 2 hdc in the last ch st. Rotate the chain to begin working in the bottom loop of the foundation chain stitches. 2 hdc in the next st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts made by the opposite side of the foundation chain. – 42 sts

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in same st. 1 hdc in the next 17 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next st. 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. – 45 sts

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 2 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. – 48 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 3 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. – 51 sts


Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 4 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. – 54 sts

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. 2 hdc in the next st.(1 hdc in the next 5 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. – 57 sts


Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 6 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. – 60 sts


Row 8: Ch 1, turn, 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 7 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 22 sts. – 63 sts


Row 9: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 8 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 22 sts. – 66 sts


Row 10: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 9 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 23 sts – fig 57. – 69 sts

Pictured above: Hood to row 10
Pictured above: Hood, folded long the middle seam.

From here, the following rows work no increases to form the length of the pocket of the hood.

Rows 11-25: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in ea st across. – 69 sts

Row 26: Ch 2, turn (does not count as first dc). 1 FPDC in the first st, 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) across. Sk last st if number is odd to provide even repeats.

Rows 27-28: Ch 2, turn. 1 BPDC in ea BPDC, 1 FPDC in ea FPDC across.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Ears / Tail (Make 3)

This piece is worked circularly in the round, then flattened to make one double-sided half circle shape which serves as both the ears and the tail. Make 3 total.

Round 1:Make magic ring – 6 sc into the ring. Join with a sl st in the first sc.

Round 2: Ch 1, does not count as first sc. 2 sc in ea sc around. Join with a sl st – 12 sc.

Rnd 3: Ch 1, 1 sc in the first st. 2 sc in the next st. (1 sc in the next st, 2 sc in the next st) rpt 5 times. Join with a sl st. – 18 sc.

Rnd 4: Ch 1, 1 sc in the first st, 1 sc in the next st. 2 sc in the next st. (1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st) 5 times. Join with a sl st. – 24 sc

Rnd 5: Ch 1, 1 sc in ea st around. -24 sc.

Rnds 6-9 or 10: Rpt Rnd 5.

Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Assembly:

Attach new yarn to the corner of the front opening of the onesie, so that you are working down the side of the hdc rows toward the bottom middle of the split . 1 sc in the side of each row of hdc, skipping the last – 19 hdc.

Rotate and begin to single crochet up the side of the rows on the opposite of the opening, stopping at the opposite corner. This is your button band – I sewed my buttons onto this row. I didn’t use buttonholes, opting instead to use the natural openings between stitches – if you follow my lead, you’ll need slightly bigger buttons 😛 But it works okay. You can also place button openings by skipping stitches and replacing them with chains.

With the buttonhole band complete, you’ll continue working across the collar. Before continuing, find the central foundation chain of the hood and attach it via locking stitch marker to the center of the collar (found by counting out).

From here, I slip stitched the hood onto the collar by inserting my hook into both layers at once, matching one stitch per row end on the hood.

You’ll likely have to slip stitch over a few stitches before you reach the point where you begin the hood seam. It’s also perfectly acceptable to cut your yarn, tie off, and just sew your hood seam using yarn and tapestry needle – I just prefer the sl st method because the seam is sturdier.

Once the hood is complete, try on the garment if possible to fit the ears and tail where you like them, using stitch markers as a guide on where to sew. Whip stitch the edges of flattened half circles together and sew on.

With my yarn and needle, I sewed on a long and frankly overpopulated line of buttons onto one side of the opening. As mentioned earlier, my buttons are a little small to be using the stitch holes, but whatever.

Lastly, after I had woven in all the ends, I strung a length of mesh ribbon yarn through the post stitch belt loops as a tie. This garment is pretty heavy when all assembled so the belt helps keep it all stabilized.

And with that, voila! You or someone you love is now a Teddy Bear.

This piece could EASILY be any of its components as a stand-alone – i.e, just the hood with ears, or just the upper portion to make a hoodie, etc. I don’t think I could pull off just the shorts portion personally but someone might wanna try 😉

As I mentioned earlier I do intend on creating a fully formatted pattern with sizes and exact stitch counts at some point – until then, enjoy and let me know what you think! ❤

You know, I was almost a little embarrassed to post these pictures. I don’t know if anyone would guess, but it’s a pretty big challenge for me to put myself out there like I do all the time here. So why do I do it? Because some inner force compels me to make weird stuff and share it.

Life is short. Wear whatever the F$%# you want.

-MF

P.S – I had to work really hard not to make a Quarenstain Bears joke in the main text.

T-Shirt Rug Video Tutorial

Hi everyone! Like many out there in America right now, I’m scrambling to catch up with a world that was turned upside-down by COVID-19 virtually overnight. I know that there is a lot of hype out there, but I’m taking my responsibility seriously and I hope you do too – I am practicing social distancing and self-quarantine despite not having any symptoms. This is a vital strategy for everyone to employ as much as possible right now, and here’s a great article that explains why:

Covid-19 Update: A Message From Concerned Physicians

Ok! But that just means we have lots of extra time for hobbies, right? Right. Especially ones that don’t cost us a lot of extra money, and here’s a great one I’ve been meaning to bring out in video tutorial form anyway: The T-shirt Rug!

This is a favorite project of mine, resulting in lots of versions in the past and eating up lots of recycled t-shirts given to me by friends and family. The original blog post for this project gives the links for how to make your own t-shirt yarn, as well as the written tutorial for the general strategy.

See the video below for a step-by-step guide on how to create the first part of your own recycled t-shirt rug, plus me rambling and stuttering, ya know, as a bonus. 😛 Other links that are referenced in the video:
Working a flat circle

This video covers the first 9 or so rounds, and you should be able to take it from there – but I may end up doing a Part 2 if enough people want me to! As always, I love your feedback and comments so be sure to leave ’em and don’t forget to like my video and subscribe to my Youtube channel if you haven’t yet ❤

Enjoy!

-MF

Sundogs Throw

Recently as I was attempting to cram coax yarn into my shelves while my friend Arika looked on and giggled, I got inspired to do a little stash-busting. Instead of continuing to struggle, I threw out some spare skeins out on the floor and together we crafted an eye-pleasing sequence of colors just for the fun of it, and as I looked on my mental list nudged me. I’ve been meaning to do something like this for a while!

Based on an old motif I made years ago, this circular blanket pattern is worked in #4 weight acrylic yarns changing color every (or nearly every) row. It’s rainbow inspiration is perfect for using up the bright, cheap acrylics that are ubiquitous in my stash thanks to my (welcome) reputation among my friends as a walking Yarn Orphanage 😉

Named the Sun Dogs Throw after the optical effects that occur when ice crystals refract light into rainbows around the sun – I imagined this retro, prismatic piece as a tribute to funky love blankies everywhere, the kind that travel with you but always remind you of home. And what better way to show it off than with an impromptu Rainbow Sprite photoshoot with your friends?

(Models clockwise from bottom left – Debbra Lee, Daisey Denson, Kate May, and Arika Harris!)

And so I created a summertime throw for laying under the rays of the sun, or draping across the chair for morning coffee by the fire. It makes a pretty good wearable shawl too 😉 I hope you love it! I’ll be taking mine camping as soon as possible ❤

Update!: The Ravelry Page is up for this design so give it a fave if you want to save it for later ❤

Materials

Hook: 6.00 mm

Yarn: Lots of colors in worsted weight acrylics. My estimate ~ 1000 – 1200 yards

Gauge = 6 sts & 3 rows = 2”

Finished measurements: 85” across from crest to crest, 55” across from trough to trough

Notes: Change color after every round or so. Join new color to the first stitch of the round.

Instructions

To begin, make Magic Ring

Rnd 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc). 11 dc into the ring, join with a sl st into the 1st dc – 12 dc.

Rnd 2: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc). 1 dc in the same st. 2 dc in each of the next 11 sts. Join with a sl st in 1st dc. – 24 dc

Rnd 3: Sc in the same st as join, ch 4, skip 2 sts (sc in the next st, ch 3, skip 2 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in 1st sc – 8 ch-3 spaces made.

Rnd 4: Sl st into the next ch-3 space. Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc 4 more times into the same space, ch 1. (5 dc into the next ch-3 space, ch 1) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in 1st dc. – 8 blocks of 5-dc, 8 ch-1 spaces made.

Rnd 5: Ch 2 (counts as 1st hdc), 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, hdc in the next st, 2 sc in the next ch-1 space. (Hdc in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, hdc in the next st, 2 sc in the next ch-1 space) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st hdc.

Rnd 6: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc in the next st. 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts. Sc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, sc2tog over the next 2 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 7: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, skip next sc. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, sk next st) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 8: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st into the 1st dc.

Rnd 9: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 5 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr)  in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 10: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 7 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 11: Ch 3 (counts as 1 st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 9 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 12: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 11 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 13: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 13 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 14: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 15 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 15: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 17 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 16: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 17: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

 Rnd 18: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.  

Rnd 19: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts. Sk next st. Sl st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 20: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 21: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. Sk next st. Sl st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 22: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 23: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 24: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 25: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 26: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 27: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 28: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 29: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join

Rnd 30: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 31:  Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 34 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 32: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 36 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 33: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 38 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 34: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 40 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 35: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 42 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 36: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 44 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Cut yarn and tie off, weave in all ends.

(they’re about to drop a sick album)

Is it just me or is there something really, really comforting about a handmade, bright, crocheted blanket? I slept under them as a kid all the time – my grandma Metzger’s work – and we used them as blankets to lay on the grass in the summer, and they always smelled like the same closet, the closet upstairs next to my parent’s room, where I was born.

I hope this blanket design becomes like those, when it goes out in the world. The kind you can feel the love in. ❤

-MF

P.S- We all dug in my crochet bin and decorated with other goodies for this photoshoot, so here’s what else we’re wearing!

Me: (Pictured just above) The Valkyrie Top

Daisey Denson: Mehndi Halter Top, Lotus Hooded Duster

Debbra Lee: Embla Vest (sleeved) , Patchwork skirt sewn by me from Wendy Kay’s No Gathers Skirt pattern on Etsy.

Arika Harris: Embla Vest (linked above), and the Sundogs Throw of course 😉

Kate May: Embla Vest (linked above) and Basic Bralette

Thanks again to my amazing models for always being willing to dress up crazy, hike out into the mud and rocks, alternately freeze / sweat / get blinded by the sun, and generally have a blast with me 🙂

Lotus Video Tutorial Part 6

It’s finally time to debut the finishing video for the Lotus Mandala Duster pattern – Part 6, the Sleeves! I’m very happy with the response from this video series and am looking forward to exploring more video tutorial goodness so be sure to subscribe to my Youtube Channel so you can catch all the latest content 🙂

Since the sleeves are written in steps instead of specifically numbered rounds, you can repeat certain steps to get the length and flare that you like in the sleeve. The video goes into this more, as well as demonstrating how to taper by placing decreases, mirror the directions on the other side, etc – I tried to hit some of the major questions I’ve been asked about this part of the pattern before! Hopefully it’s helpful.

The sleeves were my stroke of drama for this design when I first made it, and what really captured my attention. The sister design, the Lotus Vest, didn’t quite charm me the way the Duster did, and I think it’s because I just love those crazy sleeves so much.

I did eventually design a slimmer, more everyday sleeve for the Lotus Vest, which could easily be crossed with the Lotus Duster using the same techniques shown in the video, if you wanted a less burdensome arm covering 😉

Pictured above: Lotus Vest with Cardigan Sleeve added

I’d say that it feels great to wrap up this design, but I know for a fact that I’ll still be fiddling with this pattern in the future, adding more size options and so forth. I’m nothing if not persistent, LOL!

-MF