Lotus Hooded Duster

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It’s finally time! I’ve received many requests over the last few years to design a hood for my Lotus Duster free crochet pattern, and it’s been on my to-do list for long enough – today we debut the hood addition to this design! πŸ˜€

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The hood is partially made, then inserted into the main pattern rather than added after the entire thing is finished, so if you are working the Lotus Duster you will be adding the hood after Round 22, then continuing with the main pattern from there and working over the hood brim in addition to the rest of the garment. Also, I made the version pictured here sleeveless (because I wanted to wear it this summer) and I made a few adjustments to the sizing as well, which are explained in the instructions πŸ™‚

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If you like these patterns and want the portable, printable, ad-free version, good news! The Hood Tutorial is now included as a bonus PDF along with the PDF version of the Lotus Mandala Duster pattern, available in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Pattern Store! And don’t forget my offer for bundled patterns with my new pattern discount codes:
15% off of 2: MF15OFF
20% off of 3-4: MF20OFF
25% off of 5-6: MF25OFF
30% off of 7+: MF30OFF

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The pattern given for the Hood is more of a tutorial and doesn’t include specific stitch counts like the main Lotus Duster pattern does. I also used a random mishmash of yarns, some slightly bigger than I would normally use for this design, which makes a difference in sizing and gauge, etc – so I left the hood instructions open with modifications for individual gauge and preference. I considered using the standard yarn that I use for the main pattern, but I just really wanted to make this crazy thing using all these crazy yarns!

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The majority of the yarns used in this example are either upcycled by me from old sweaters (see my detailed tutorial on how to recycle sweater yarn) or rescued from the thrift store. If you liked this project, give a girl a fave over on the Ravelry project page for this design!

Oh, and those leafy wrap bracelets I am wearing are from another FREE crochet pattern of mine, the Ivy Crown garland.

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Lotus Hooded Duster

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Materials: 5.50 mm hook
Extra yarn – I would estimate the hood addition requires 300-500 yards of yarn more than the standard pattern. Please refer to the main pattern for more info on materials needed, gauge, etc.

Notes: As mentioned, I made a few tweaks to the sizing of this sleeveless duster to get the look I wanted. I started working the main pattern in size Small, then added length and width by working some of the extra rows suggested in the Large size – but not all of them, so the size came out more like a Medium.

Instructions

Work the Lotus Duster 2.0 pattern through to Round 21.

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On Rnd 22 I made an adjustment to the amount of double crochet that I worked across the chain loop that creates the armhole opening.

22. Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 1 dc in the next dc (3 dc in the next ch-1 space, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 9 times. 3 dc in the next ch-1 sp, 1 dc in the next dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 30, 33 ch sts. 1 dc in the next dc (1 dc in the next ch sp, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 9, 13 times**. 1 dc in the next ch sp, 1 dc in the next dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 30, 33 ch sts. 1 dc in the next dc (3 dc in the next ch-1 space, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 63, 65 times. 3 dc in the next ch-1 sp, join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 460, 488 sts”

Instead of working 1 dc in each of the chain stitches made for the armhole loops (making 30 total dc over each armhole) I worked 20 total dc into the armhole loop itself, not the stitches. This means that the stitches can stretch across the loop made by the chains and are not anchored to the stitches themselves – to do this, just insert the hook underneath the chain loop to work your stitches across (do not insert your hook into the actual stitches, just the space underneath the chain).

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I forgot to get an actual picture at this stage, so this one is from a little later in the pattern. Still, check out how the stitches are arranged across the armhole loop space – this accomplishes a slight tightening at the bust and shoulder area and makes room for the extra draping material that will be added by the presence of the hood. If these step seems confusing or you are having trouble with sizing, it’s 100% okay to skip this step – it’s not a crucial adjustment. I just made this change because it helps keep all that pretty lacey material tucked around the shoulders for a better fit.

So with that in mind, finish Round 22 as written with or without the armhole adjustments. Once Rnd 22 is complete, set the main body of the duster aside to begin the hood.

Hood Instructions

Using the 5.50 mm hook and your yarn of choice, Chain 35.

The length you chain depends on your gauge – if you hold the chain starting at the nape of the neck, it should be long enough to reach the back of your head. If 35 is too short, chain more.

Row 1: Dc in the 4th ch from hook, ch 1, sk next st. (Dc, ch 1, sk next st) 14 times, or however many times you need to reach the second to last stitch of the chain. Dc, ch 1 in next st. In the last st of the chain, work (Dc, ch 1) 3 times. Rotate the piece so that you are working into the bottom of the chain stitches, creating a chain with stitches on both sides. Dc, ch 1 in the next st, sk next st. (Dc, ch 1, sk next st) 14 times. Dc in next st. Dc in the final st.

Row 2:  Ch 4 (counts as first dc + ch 1), turn. (Dc in next ch -1 space, ch 1) 16 times. (Dc, ch 1) twice in ea of the next 2 ch-1 spaces. (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 16 times. Dc in the final dc of the previous row.

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The central chain at the back of the hood
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The instructions in bold create two increase spaces at the tip of one end of the piece. Through the next part, you will work the same kind of increase in each of these two increase spaces on every row – so it’s helpful to mark them!

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Row 3: Ch 3 (counts as first dc), turn. (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 17 times. (Dc, ch 1) twice in the next space. Dc, ch 1 in the next space. (Dc, ch 1) twice in the next space. (Dc in the next space, ch 1) 16 times. 1 dc in the final ch-1 space, 1 dc in the final dc of the previous row.

Row 4: Ch 4 (counts as first dc + ch 1). (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 18 times. (Dc, ch 1) twice in the next space. Dc, ch 1 in each of the next 2 spaces. (Dc, ch 1) twice in the next space. (Dc in the next space, ch 1) 18 times.  Dc in the final dc of the previous row.

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Side profile of the hood addition, folded in half – at 9 rows

Keep working in this same manner, placing increases at the two increase points on every row, until your hood has 11 total rows (or until the hood is tall enough to reach the top of your head).

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The next few rows skip the increases to add depth to the hood without adding more height. You can repeat the next two rows as many times as you like to get the depth of hood that you want/need, but remember that since there are still 15 rounds left in the main pattern that will add height and depth to the hood, so you really don’t need this part to be a fully functioning hood yet.

Row 12: Ch 4 (counts as first dc + ch 1). (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) in each space across. Dc in the final dc of the previous row.

Row 13: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) across. 1 dc in the final ch space, 1 dc in the final dc of the previous row.

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Once your hood addition is completed, cut your yarn and tie off. Now we are going to  attach the hood to the work-in-progress main body of the duster.

My hood addition when finished by itself is about 20″ across the bottom, and 12″ at the highest point. 

Attaching the Hood

On the main duster, use a stitch marker to mark the central dc between the armholes. I do this by counting how many v-stitches are in the row below, then finding the central v-stitch or space between v-stitches – the double crochet above will be the central point. Align the hood’s flat edge with this point, matching the end of the foundation chain to the middle point marked on the duster.

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Attach yarn, insert hook through both the vest and the hood at the central point. Work a sc in ea dc through the hood, working 2 attaching stitches for the side of every DC at the end of a row. This was 25 stitches for me to get to the end of the hood.

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Half the hood is now attached – now we start on the other side and attach the opposite half.

Count out the amount of sts needed for the other side. Cut yarn and reattach at this point, then work toward the central point using the same strategy to attach.

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Of course, you can always just whip stitch the hood onto the main duster if using a crocheted method of attaching seems like too much bother. I prefer a stitched seam here because the hood is going to be resisting against the weight of the rest of the duster (which is not light) and I want the seam to be strong and not stretch too much.

Once your hood is attached in whichever fashion you prefer, cut your yarn and tie off. It’s time to pick back up where we left off on the main body of the duster at Round 23. Only now, we will be working all the rest of the rounds across the brim of the hood as well as around the main body.

“23. Ch 3 – counts as first dc. (Sk next three sts, 1 dc in the next st. Ch 3, 1 dc in the same st) 114, 121 times. Sk next three sts, dc in the next st, ch 1. Hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3 to join.”

Round 23 creates V-stitches all around the garment – to work the first round that includes the hood, work a V-stitch over the arm opening stitches as  instructed…

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Then work a V-stitch in every other ch-1 space around the brim of the hood addition.

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Continue the round across the entire brim of the hood, and then around the main body as well, using the instructions given. Remember that because of the hood addition, your stitch counts will not be the same as given in the main pattern.

Once Round 23 is complete, all remaining rounds can be worked as written in the main Lotus Duster pattern, just working around the entire body including the hood! One more consideration is the half-rounds at Rnd 35 and 36 – because you have added a hood, you’ll have to recalculate what amount of stitches constitutes the top half of the garment and then work the half-rounds across that amount of stitches, not the amount given in the main pattern.

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To calculate this number, count the total number of stitches in Rnd 34, then divide that number by half. Beginning with the Rnd 34 join at the side of the duster, count out your V-stitches that equal half of the total. Mark the final stitch of this set, then work Row 35 and 36 only on that portion following the instructions given. For my duster vest, half of the total equalled 224 V-stitches.

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Once the garment in completed, I cut the yarn and wove in the ends. I added the slip stitching necessary to anchor the ties as shown in the main pattern, then added two braided ties on each side.

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Since I left this version sleeveless, I finished the armholes with a row of dc around the inside.

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I really love this particular version of the Lotus Duster – the lack of sleeves makes it a good garment for warmer weather, but the hood and the length make it mysterious and costume-y enough to be a stunning festival piece! In my tradition of naming these after female singer songwriters, I’m calling this baby “Florence.” ❀

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The polymer clay horns and woodland tree spirit pendant I am wearing in this shoot came from my amazing friend Wendy Davies from Dark Pony Art – please check out her art and give her a like on her Facebook Page!

If you like my designs, you can head over to my Facebook Page too and hit that follow button!

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As always, I’m filled with gratitude for everyone who likes, comments, shares, and creates my designs! I can’t help but remember a time when where I am at now seemed beyond my wildest imaginings ❀ And it’s all possible because of you magical beings out there who support me, thank you so much ❀ I am honored to create with you!

-MF

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Vintage Derby Pattern

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I’ve always loved the bowler, a.k.a derby hat, and I think this cute but classy style looks great with anything! So I was inspired to create a crochet version, with a vintage-y feel and body stiff enough to maintain the classic bowler shape. The Vintage Derby pattern is the result, a pretty simple crochet pattern suitable for beginners but with some textural tweaks – this pattern uses waistcoat stitch crochet, a.k.a knit stitch, and yarn held double.

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I chose the waistcoat/knit stitch because I wanted the surface of the hat smoother than regular single crochet could do, and because I thought it added to that vintage look I was going for. It’s really a simple stitch to learn and I recommend this tutorial for learning waistcoat stitch from Crafternoon Treats.

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For the yarn held double, simply crochet as you would, but with two strands of yarn instead of one – this makes the body nice and thick, which helps hold the shape of the hat.

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If you like this cute springtime accessory as much as I did, consider giving the project page a like on Ravelry!

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Vintage Derby

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Materials:
Yarn: Deborah Norville Everyday (#4 weight, 113g / 203 yds 100% Anti-Pill Acrylic), 2 skeins in “Chinchilla”
50 yds contrasting yarn for the band
5.00 mm hook
Scissors and Tapestry needle

Gauge: 3 sts and 4 rows = 1″ in waistcoat stitch (ws)

Finished measurements: 24″ around (inner brim), 6.5″ height, 1.5″ wide brim

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Notes: Working the waistcoat stitch with double worsted yarn and a 5 hook was not easy at first! I had to consciously adjust my tension so that I was not single crocheting as tight as I normally would. If you are having trouble drawing up loops from the stitch below (through the post area) you will want to adjust your tension to be more loose.

Instructions:

With yarn held double, make a magic ring.

Rnd 1: 5 sc into the ring. Do not join – begin to work in the round, placing marker in the first stitch of every rnd. – 5 sts

Rnd 2: 2 ws in ea of the next 5 sc sts. – 10 sts

Rnd 3: *1 ws in the next st, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 15 sts

Rnd 4: *1 ws in the next 2 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 20 sts

Rnd 5: *1 ws in the next 3 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 25 sts

Rnd 6: *1 ws in the next 4 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 30 sts

Rnd 7: *1 ws in the next 5 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 35 sts

Rnd 8: *1 ws in the next 6 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 40 sts

Rnd 9: *1 ws in the next 7 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 45 sts

Rnd 10: *1 ws in the next 8 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 50 sts

Rnd 11: *1 ws in the next 9 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 55 sts

Rnd 12: *1 ws in the next 10 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 60 sts

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Rnd 13:Β *1 ws in the next 11 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 65 sts

Rnd 14: 1 ws in each st around. – 65 sts

Rnd 15: *1 ws in the next 12 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 70 sts

Rnd 16: Rpt Rnd 14

Rnd 17: *1 ws in the next 13 sts. 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 75 sts

Rnds 18 – 30: 1 ws in each st around – 75 sts

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Rnd 31: *1 ws in the next 14 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 80 sts

Rnd 32: *1 ws in the next 15 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 85 sts

Rnd 33: *1 ws in the next 16 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 90 sts

Rnd 34: *1 ws in the next 17 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 95 sts

Rnd 35: *1 ws in the next 18 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 100 sts

Rnd 36: *1 ws in the next 19 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 105 sts

Rnds 37 – 42: 1 ws in ea st around. – 105 sts

Slip stitch a few extra stitches at the end of the last round. Cut yarn and tie off.

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Reverse the hat and reattach the yarn, held double, on the last rowΒ  on the opposite side. Slip stitch in each stitch around on the inside of the brim – this helps neaten the brim and keep it sturdy. Cut yarn and tie off again when finished.

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Weave in all ends using the tapestry needle.

Hat Band:

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Using the 5.00 mm hook and the contrasting yarn held double, ch 75.

Rnd 1: Join chain in a ring, being careful not to twist the chain. Sc in each ch stitch around. Join with a slip stitch to the first st of the round.- 75 sts

Rnd 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first st). Ws in the first st. 1 ws in each st around. Join with a sl st. – 75 sts

Rnd 3: Repeat Rnd 2. Cut yarn, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Weave in the spare end, then thread the tapestry needle with the long end and use it to sew the band onto the hat. If you would rather not attach the band, it should stay pretty secure anyway – your call!

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It was fun dreaming up a vintagey look to match the hat – but next time I will do the photoshoot BEFORE I dig out a bunch of plants from a garden bed in the hot sun, lol!

 

This little pattern was so much fun, I was reminded of how much I love making hats! I do have a DOOZY cooked up as an idea for the future, but I haven’t put hook to yarn on that yet – stick around and see more by following my blog or following my Facebook page!

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If you like funky hats, you should check out my FREE horned monstrosity, the Krampus Hat Pattern.

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If vintage and steampunk-y is your style, maybe you’d like some Ruffled Wrister gloves to match your hat? That one’s also free!

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❀ – MF

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Pixie Belt PDF

Just popping in for a quick reminder that my Pixie Pocket Belt tutorial is now available in downloadable, portable, printable, ad-free form! Head over to my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Pattern Store to get it ❀ ❀ ❀ Thanks for visiting and supporting – the free version is still available on my blog in this series of posts, but PDF’s are more convenient and accessible – plus I get yarn money which allows me to make more patterns and tutorials!

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I also have the most recently finished pixie belt, “Dogwood” to share. I made this one for me, since I didn’t have my own yet. My favorite colors, plus some extra slip stitch fanciness, resin cabochon details, and even a leather and crochet pocket.

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I loved crocheting on the leather and plan to do more – and maybe even make some tutorials for it! πŸ˜‰

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I especially enjoy the deer antler button fastenings and the adjustable ribbon tie combo – so there are multiple ways to wear this. I’d have to say these are in the running for my #1 favorite crochet project to make, I hope you love them as much as I do!

-MF