Teddy Bear Onesie

The craze for animal-themed full-body pyjamas here in America has mostly passed my wardrobe by, but I have to admit that when I saw a fuzzy, teddy bear version with shorts and a hood while online shopping I thought it would look awefully cute.

The problem was that the product was on one of those cheap knockoff websites, you know, the same kind that steal images from independent artists like me and use the picture to sell terrible swill. So even if I could order a product that would actually fit my body (I checked the measurements chart – I couldn’t) I probably wouldn’t receive anything I’d actually want to wear.

So I thought to myself, as I very often do: “I could probably crochet that.”

And the next time I was in the Bad Yarn Buying Place, lo and behold I did find the absolute perfect yarn to imitate the garment I wanted. I decided to create what I wanted for me, and then document the process and offer it as a free tutorial here! Crappy companies steal from me and make money, so I’m stealing from crappy companies and giving back to you. And hopefully making some money. 😉 (Speaking of which, have you seen my new Tip Jar?)

I intend to create a more comprehensive pattern for this in the future, with more detailed stitch counts and size options, but for now a description of my math and a photo tutorial with written instructions for the size I made (small) should get you started! If you make it I’d love to see – I have a Facebook Group for sharing crochet projects and we’d love to have you!

Keep scrolling for the FREE tutorial! If you want to save it for later, give it a fave on the Ravelry Pattern Page.

Materials & Notes:

Red Heart Hygge Fur (#5 Bulky, 7 oz/200 g, 260 yds – color shown is “Smokey) – 6 skeins
6.00 mm crochet hook
Buttons – I used 5/8ths inch buttons but next time I would choose inch buttons as they ended up being a little small
Ribbon or tie for the waist (optional) – I used an acyrlic mesh ribbon yarn
Scissors & tapestry needle
Measuring tape (comes in handy)

Gauge: 6 sts & 4 rows = 2″ (I measured gauge carefully but all other measurements given for schematics, fit, etc are approximated with measuring tape with the garment laid flat 🙂 )

Notes: As mentioned in my demo video (link below), this pattern utilizes a yarn that makes the stitches very hard to see – so I recommend keeping good note of your stitch counts and rows! I didn’t always exactly do that, but the good news is, it’s also really easy to fudge it on this project 😛

If you’re customizing your own size working from my tutorial, you may want to keep the Craft Yarn Council Standard Sizes page handy 🙂

Video Demo for working this yarn can be found here on my YouTube Channel.

Stitches Used:
Ch – chain
hdc – half double crochet
fpdc – front post double crochet
bpdc – back post double crochet
hdc2tog – half double crochet 2 together – also known as a decrease (dec)
sc – single crochet
sl st – slip stitch
MR – magic ring

Instructions

Shorts

To begin, Ch 85. Join in the first ch of the round with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first dc.) 1 hdc in every stitch. Join with a slip stitch in the first hdc of the round. – 85 sts.

Rows 2 – 20: Rpt Row 1.

Cut yarn and tie off. You’ll have a 10″ long tube, about 28″-30″ in circumference. This is most of the shorts. Next, we’ll add a small flat panel to the bottom to define the crotch and leg area.

Panel

Ch 7.

Row 1: 1 hdc in the 2nd ch from the hook. 1 hdc in ea of the next 5 ch sts. – 6 hdc.

Rows 2-10: Ch 1 (does not count). 1 hdc in every stitch. – 6 sts.

Cut yarn and tie off. Position the insert in the middle of the shorts, with one short edge against the edge on one side, and the opposite sides match the same way in the middle on the other side. Sew on the panel after checking there is an even amount of stitches left open on either side of the panel, for the legs.

I had 37 sts left free on either side for mine. I had 85 sts total for the waist, so minus the 6 sts on either side (12 total) I would have 73 remaining total. 73 / 2 = 36.5, but I’m fudging and saying 37 for simplicity’s sake. Things are fuzzy enough that 1/2 stitch estimate isn’t going to matter 😉

Pictured above: shorts laid flat after panel is added. Also you can see my reflection.

Once the insert is placed, each leg hole will have rows added to lengthen the bottom of the shorts.

Shorts – Legs instructions
Row 1: Hdc in each hdc around, placing decreases at the corners were the insert meets the upper shorts. 1 hdc in the side of each row of the insert when working across.

Rows 2-4: 1 hdc in ea stitch around. I ended up with 42 stitches, I think I placed a couple extra decreases. Check the fit to find the right amount for you 🙂

Once the rows for each leg are added, cut yarn and tie off. Shorts portion complete!

Upper Body

Belt Rib:

Locate the center stitch of the front portion of the shorts (this could be either side at this point – the shorts are identical front to back). You can do this by counting, measuring, counting up from the center of the insert, whatever. I eyeballed it carefully. We are now going to work 3 rows of post double crochets (you can find a tutorial for Post Stitches here on my blog if you don’t know how), to add some texture and a belt-loop placement for the hips.

Join new yarn at this center stitch on the top edge, working into Row 1 of the shorts. Ch 2 – does not count as first double crochet.

Row 1: 1 FPDC in the same stitch. 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) around. Join with a slip stitch in the first st. – 85 sts

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count). 1 FPDC in the next FPDC, 1 BPDC in the next BPDC. – 85 sts

Row 3: Rpt Row 2.

Do not tie off. For the next portion of the body, we continue working but stop joining the rounds at the end – instead we will be working back and forth in rows. This creates a front opening for the garment.

Pictured above: Post stitch rib rounds completed, with the first few rows of back- and – forth hdc added.

Torso

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in every stitch. – 85 sts

Next, mark 1 point at each side of the torso – the place that falls at either hip. We will decrease at each of these points over the next two rows.

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in ea st around until reaching the marked stitch. 1 hdc2tog (dec) over the marked stitch and the next st – place marker. 1 hdc in ea st around until reaching the 2nd marker. 1 hdc2tog (dec) over the marked st and the next st – place marker. 1 hdc in ea of the remaining sts – 83 sts.

Row 3: Repeat Row 2 – 81 sts.

Row 4: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in ea st around.

Rows 5- 20: Rpt Row 4.

Top Panels – Front

Now that biggest part of the upper body is build onto the shorts, we’ll fit the shoulder area. This will depend a little on how big you need your armholes – larger arms will need to leave a few more stitches unworked and/or make the panels slightly longer.

First, take two stitch markers and find the middle of each side of the garment (find by counting back from the split). Mark these two stitches as references.

For size small, I’m marking out a section 4-5 stitches inward from the front split on either side, and 4-5 sts inward from the side marker at either side. For my size the front panels will be 12 sts or ~4″ in width. Mark where you want your panels. Attach yarn at any of the markers.

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count) 1 hdc in the same stitch. 1 hdc in ea stitch across. – 12 sts.

Rows 2-15: Rpt Row 1.

Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat on the other side of the front, counting 4-5 stitches inward of the front split in the opposite direction.

Pictured above: Both 12-stitch long front panels completed. You can also see the completed back panel behind those, which we are about to tackle…

Top Panel – Back

For the back top panel, count again 4-5 stitches inward from the marked stitch on either side and place a marker for this area. Mine was 35 stitches in width, about 11.5-12″.

Row 1: Attach yarn at marked area. Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea stitch across. – 35 sts.

Row 2: Ch 1, 1 hdc in ea st across. – 35 sts.

Rows 3-15: Rpt Row 2.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Pictured above: Back top panel, complete

Sleeves

Match the top edges of the front and back panels so that the outer edges of the front panels are aligned with the outer edges of the back panel.

With a yarn and tapestry needle, sew a seam across the top edges, matching each stitch together, with a whip stitch. Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat for other shoulder seam.

Pictured above: Shoulders with seams marked

With the stitch markers, mark where the seam you just sewed is located on either side.

Round 1: Attach yarn at the bottom of the sleeve, in the center of the unworked spaces at the armpit. Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea of the next sts around the entire sleeve, moving the marked stitch’s marker to the stitch above it as you work.

Rnd 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea of the next sts around until reaching the marked stitch at the shoulder. 1 hdc2together over the marked stitch and the next st – move marker to stitch just made. 1 hdc in ea of the remaining sts. Join with a sl st in the first hdc of the round. – 36 sts.

Pictured Above & below: First three rounds with marker moved

Rnd 3: Rpt Rnd 2. – 35 sts.

Rnds 4 -32: Ch 1 (does not count). 1 hdc in every st around. Join with a sl st. – 35 sts.

Rnd 33: Ch 2 (does not count as first double crochet). 1 FPDC in the same st. 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) around. Sk last st if your total sts are not an even number ( this also makes a good thumbhole if your sleeves are long enough). – 34 sts.

Rnds 34-35: Repeat round 33.

Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat for other side’s sleeve.

Hood

Row 1: Ch 21. Hdc in the 2rd ch from the hook and in ea of the next 17 ch sts. 2 hdc in the next ch st. 2 hdc in the last ch st. Rotate the chain to begin working in the bottom loop of the foundation chain stitches. 2 hdc in the next st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts made by the opposite side of the foundation chain. – 42 sts

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in same st. 1 hdc in the next 17 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next st. 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. – 45 sts

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 2 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. – 48 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 3 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. – 51 sts


Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 4 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. – 54 sts

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. 2 hdc in the next st.(1 hdc in the next 5 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. – 57 sts


Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 6 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. – 60 sts


Row 8: Ch 1, turn, 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 7 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 22 sts. – 63 sts


Row 9: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 8 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 22 sts. – 66 sts


Row 10: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 9 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 23 sts – fig 57. – 69 sts

Pictured above: Hood to row 10
Pictured above: Hood, folded long the middle seam.

From here, the following rows work no increases to form the length of the pocket of the hood.

Rows 11-25: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in ea st across. – 69 sts

Row 26: Ch 2, turn (does not count as first dc). 1 FPDC in the first st, 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) across. Sk last st if number is odd to provide even repeats.

Rows 27-28: Ch 2, turn. 1 BPDC in ea BPDC, 1 FPDC in ea FPDC across.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Ears / Tail (Make 3)

This piece is worked circularly in the round, then flattened to make one double-sided half circle shape which serves as both the ears and the tail. Make 3 total.

Round 1:Make magic ring – 6 sc into the ring. Join with a sl st in the first sc.

Round 2: Ch 1, does not count as first sc. 2 sc in ea sc around. Join with a sl st – 12 sc.

Rnd 3: Ch 1, 1 sc in the first st. 2 sc in the next st. (1 sc in the next st, 2 sc in the next st) rpt 5 times. Join with a sl st. – 18 sc.

Rnd 4: Ch 1, 1 sc in the first st, 1 sc in the next st. 2 sc in the next st. (1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st) 5 times. Join with a sl st. – 24 sc

Rnd 5: Ch 1, 1 sc in ea st around. -24 sc.

Rnds 6-9 or 10: Rpt Rnd 5.

Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Assembly:

Attach new yarn to the corner of the front opening of the onesie, so that you are working down the side of the hdc rows toward the bottom middle of the split . 1 sc in the side of each row of hdc, skipping the last – 19 hdc.

Rotate and begin to single crochet up the side of the rows on the opposite of the opening, stopping at the opposite corner. This is your button band – I sewed my buttons onto this row. I didn’t use buttonholes, opting instead to use the natural openings between stitches – if you follow my lead, you’ll need slightly bigger buttons 😛 But it works okay. You can also place button openings by skipping stitches and replacing them with chains.

With the buttonhole band complete, you’ll continue working across the collar. Before continuing, find the central foundation chain of the hood and attach it via locking stitch marker to the center of the collar (found by counting out).

From here, I slip stitched the hood onto the collar by inserting my hook into both layers at once, matching one stitch per row end on the hood.

You’ll likely have to slip stitch over a few stitches before you reach the point where you begin the hood seam. It’s also perfectly acceptable to cut your yarn, tie off, and just sew your hood seam using yarn and tapestry needle – I just prefer the sl st method because the seam is sturdier.

Once the hood is complete, try on the garment if possible to fit the ears and tail where you like them, using stitch markers as a guide on where to sew. Whip stitch the edges of flattened half circles together and sew on.

With my yarn and needle, I sewed on a long and frankly overpopulated line of buttons onto one side of the opening. As mentioned earlier, my buttons are a little small to be using the stitch holes, but whatever.

Lastly, after I had woven in all the ends, I strung a length of mesh ribbon yarn through the post stitch belt loops as a tie. This garment is pretty heavy when all assembled so the belt helps keep it all stabilized.

And with that, voila! You or someone you love is now a Teddy Bear.

This piece could EASILY be any of its components as a stand-alone – i.e, just the hood with ears, or just the upper portion to make a hoodie, etc. I don’t think I could pull off just the shorts portion personally but someone might wanna try 😉

As I mentioned earlier I do intend on creating a fully formatted pattern with sizes and exact stitch counts at some point – until then, enjoy and let me know what you think! ❤

You know, I was almost a little embarrassed to post these pictures. I don’t know if anyone would guess, but it’s a pretty big challenge for me to put myself out there like I do all the time here. So why do I do it? Because some inner force compels me to make weird stuff and share it.

Life is short. Wear whatever the F$%# you want.

-MF

P.S – I had to work really hard not to make a Quarenstain Bears joke in the main text.

T-Shirt Rug Video Tutorial

Hi everyone! Like many out there in America right now, I’m scrambling to catch up with a world that was turned upside-down by COVID-19 virtually overnight. I know that there is a lot of hype out there, but I’m taking my responsibility seriously and I hope you do too – I am practicing social distancing and self-quarantine despite not having any symptoms. This is a vital strategy for everyone to employ as much as possible right now, and here’s a great article that explains why:

Covid-19 Update: A Message From Concerned Physicians

Ok! But that just means we have lots of extra time for hobbies, right? Right. Especially ones that don’t cost us a lot of extra money, and here’s a great one I’ve been meaning to bring out in video tutorial form anyway: The T-shirt Rug!

This is a favorite project of mine, resulting in lots of versions in the past and eating up lots of recycled t-shirts given to me by friends and family. The original blog post for this project gives the links for how to make your own t-shirt yarn, as well as the written tutorial for the general strategy.

See the video below for a step-by-step guide on how to create the first part of your own recycled t-shirt rug, plus me rambling and stuttering, ya know, as a bonus. 😛 Other links that are referenced in the video:
Working a flat circle

This video covers the first 9 or so rounds, and you should be able to take it from there – but I may end up doing a Part 2 if enough people want me to! As always, I love your feedback and comments so be sure to leave ’em and don’t forget to like my video and subscribe to my Youtube channel if you haven’t yet ❤

Enjoy!

-MF

Pattern Gallery: Scrappy

I’d gotten out of the habit of doing pattern collection posts until last December when I couldn’t resist a Krampus-themed one. Now I’ve been thinking about all the scrappy projects I’ve done, and decided I’d do one focused just on my pattern offerings because hey, what am I here for anyway 😉

Scrappy projects are those that utilize scrap lengths of yarn, leftovers that aren’t big enough for full projects. Technically any project can use scrap yarn if you want it to, but these are projects I designed to feature the nature of scraps in some way, or create an easy way to use them – i.e – strategize a way to feature unwoven in ends & short stripes, or create a pattern flattering to frequent color changes.

So here you go! I hope you enjoy and come share your projects on our Facebook Group, the Magic Fantastic Crochet Atelier!

Scrappy Patterns

1. Scrappy Granny Shawl – FREE. Super easy to customize and looks great in virtually any yarn. The Granny block stitches are a familiar and easy semi-open pattern that breaks up the color changes creating neat colored patches to the eye. Plus you just gotta feel like a boho damsel in this one!

2. Wayfarer Ruana – This giant ruana is a FREE pattern that combines both knit and crochet. The knit body of the ruana utilizes some very small scraps and is a serious scrapbuster! I also designed the garment with a fringe that incorporates the loose ends of all those scraps, so you don’t have to weave in. The edge of the piece is a sewn-on strip of granny squares, because why not? Hidden within this blog post pattern is a detailed, free, and easy tutorial for crochet granny squares designed for beginners, because I wanted to 😉

3. Pixie Belt Tutorial – Inspired by less traditional styles (or perhaps FAR more traditional styles depending on your views of the little folk) comes the supremely fun to create Pixie Belt. This project is great for mixing and matching yarns, using up small scraps, and even busting some of your fabric stash. I make them and sell them as costume pieces to friends and festival-goers, or perhaps you know a little folk yourself who needs a mini-version 🙂 The free tutorial for customizing your own comes as a series on my blog but is also purchasable as a single collection in one PDF.

4. Scrappy Knit Duster – The free knit tutorial for this western duster coat follows in the heritage of the Wayfarer Ruana, using small bits to knit long panels of color, leaving the unwoven ends as part of the fringe which is incorporated into the design. This garment provides a more snug fit than the ruana – and sleeves of course – because I wanted something that I could use for more everyday wear.

5. Rhiannon Hooded Cowl – I originally made these using scraps, then decided to write a pattern for the design to sell and used preplanned commercial yarns. Eventually, I decided it needed an aesthetic renewal and returned it to it’s scrappy state where I think it truly functions best, offering it both for free on my blog (via the link at the beginning of the paragraph) or in purchasable PDF format via my shops (linked at the top of the blog). I love that this design lives a double life ❤ appropriate.

6. Sun Dogs Throw – This free throw blanket crochet pattern was a result of my desire to destash a lot of colorful worsted weight acrylics – though I chose a rainbow so I could have a bright, fun camping blanket this season, this throw works great in any color combination and the 8-point expansive design makes it extra cozy and wrappable. The center uses up small scraps neatly and the outer edges eat up whole spare skeins 😉

7. The Flower Child Pullover – One of the few exclusively paid patterns on the list, you can find it in my pattern shops linked above or through the blog post linked just here 🙂 Though technically I could list the cousin pattern the Mandala Top in this collection as well, I won’t because the Flower Child pattern has a feature that makes it specific to scrap busting – a list of the approximated yardage requirements for each round, for #4 worsted weight yarns. Hopefully that chart makes it easier to use up scraps by taking away some guesswork!

8. Daydreamer Poncho – Another pattern originally sprung from scraps, written for preplanned commercial yarn, and then remade in the image of Scrap 🙂 I guess I do that a lot. Anyway, I also revamped this design to include a skirt look, making it convertible too. The Daydreamer Poncho is a paid crochet pattern available in my pattern stores (linked above) or linked on the page given here with more info ❤

That’s it for my scrappy offerings today, though I’m sure more will occur in future. Looking back at all these patterns, I’m entertained at how they are pretty evenly split between faerie and rustic, fantasy and romantic western. Am I, at heart, a fairy cow girl? The historical evidence is fairly damning. Lol!

-MF

Sundogs Throw

Recently as I was attempting to cram coax yarn into my shelves while my friend Arika looked on and giggled, I got inspired to do a little stash-busting. Instead of continuing to struggle, I threw out some spare skeins out on the floor and together we crafted an eye-pleasing sequence of colors just for the fun of it, and as I looked on my mental list nudged me. I’ve been meaning to do something like this for a while!

Based on an old motif I made years ago, this circular blanket pattern is worked in #4 weight acrylic yarns changing color every (or nearly every) row. It’s rainbow inspiration is perfect for using up the bright, cheap acrylics that are ubiquitous in my stash thanks to my (welcome) reputation among my friends as a walking Yarn Orphanage 😉

Named the Sun Dogs Throw after the optical effects that occur when ice crystals refract light into rainbows around the sun – I imagined this retro, prismatic piece as a tribute to funky love blankies everywhere, the kind that travel with you but always remind you of home. And what better way to show it off than with an impromptu Rainbow Sprite photoshoot with your friends?

(Models clockwise from bottom left – Debbra Lee, Daisey Denson, Kate May, and Arika Harris!)

And so I created a summertime throw for laying under the rays of the sun, or draping across the chair for morning coffee by the fire. It makes a pretty good wearable shawl too 😉 I hope you love it! I’ll be taking mine camping as soon as possible ❤

Update!: The Ravelry Page is up for this design so give it a fave if you want to save it for later ❤

Materials

Hook: 6.00 mm

Yarn: Lots of colors in worsted weight acrylics. My estimate ~ 1000 – 1200 yards

Gauge = 6 sts & 3 rows = 2”

Finished measurements: 85” across from crest to crest, 55” across from trough to trough

Notes: Change color after every round or so. Join new color to the first stitch of the round.

Instructions

To begin, make Magic Ring

Rnd 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc). 11 dc into the ring, join with a sl st into the 1st dc – 12 dc.

Rnd 2: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc). 1 dc in the same st. 2 dc in each of the next 11 sts. Join with a sl st in 1st dc. – 24 dc

Rnd 3: Sc in the same st as join, ch 4, skip 2 sts (sc in the next st, ch 3, skip 2 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in 1st sc – 8 ch-3 spaces made.

Rnd 4: Sl st into the next ch-3 space. Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc 4 more times into the same space, ch 1. (5 dc into the next ch-3 space, ch 1) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in 1st dc. – 8 blocks of 5-dc, 8 ch-1 spaces made.

Rnd 5: Ch 2 (counts as 1st hdc), 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, hdc in the next st, 2 sc in the next ch-1 space. (Hdc in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, hdc in the next st, 2 sc in the next ch-1 space) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st hdc.

Rnd 6: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc in the next st. 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts. Sc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, sc2tog over the next 2 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 7: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, skip next sc. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, sk next st) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 8: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st into the 1st dc.

Rnd 9: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 5 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr)  in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 10: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 7 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 11: Ch 3 (counts as 1 st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 9 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 12: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 11 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 13: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 13 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 14: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 15 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 15: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 17 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 16: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 17: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

 Rnd 18: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.  

Rnd 19: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts. Sk next st. Sl st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 20: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 21: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. Sk next st. Sl st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 22: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 23: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 24: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 25: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 26: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 27: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 28: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 29: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join

Rnd 30: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 31:  Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 34 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 32: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 36 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 33: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 38 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 34: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 40 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 35: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 42 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 36: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 44 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Cut yarn and tie off, weave in all ends.

(they’re about to drop a sick album)

Is it just me or is there something really, really comforting about a handmade, bright, crocheted blanket? I slept under them as a kid all the time – my grandma Metzger’s work – and we used them as blankets to lay on the grass in the summer, and they always smelled like the same closet, the closet upstairs next to my parent’s room, where I was born.

I hope this blanket design becomes like those, when it goes out in the world. The kind you can feel the love in. ❤

-MF

P.S- We all dug in my crochet bin and decorated with other goodies for this photoshoot, so here’s what else we’re wearing!

Me: (Pictured just above) The Valkyrie Top

Daisey Denson: Mehndi Halter Top, Lotus Hooded Duster

Debbra Lee: Embla Vest (sleeved) , Patchwork skirt sewn by me from Wendy Kay’s No Gathers Skirt pattern on Etsy.

Arika Harris: Embla Vest (linked above), and the Sundogs Throw of course 😉

Kate May: Embla Vest (linked above) and Basic Bralette

Thanks again to my amazing models for always being willing to dress up crazy, hike out into the mud and rocks, alternately freeze / sweat / get blinded by the sun, and generally have a blast with me 🙂