Tunisian Knit Stitch Tutorial

A few days ago I released the Tunisian Simple Stitch Tutorial, mostly from material I had already compiled for my Shaman Coat pattern, which utilizes that stitch. Well, that post was a pre-game for what I have to offer today, which is the Tunisian Knit Stitch Tutorial.

Tunisian (also called Afghan) crochet is a method that uses a long hook to keep multiple stitch loops on the hook before working them back off to complete them. There are many different Tunisian stitches – here is how to work the Tunisian Knit Stitch (TKS) which makes a fabric that looks very much like knitting. This tutorial covers the basics of working TKS, as well as working increases and decreases in this stitch.

The sudden outburst of Tunisian tutelage is inspired by an upcoming design of mine featuring Tunisian knit stitch, but also by the fact that I just really love Tunisian crochet, and I hope to encourage others to love it too. I promise it’s worth it!

Tunisian Knit Stitch Tutorial

The Hold:

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Working Tunisian crochet may require a different hold than regular crochet – here’s an example of how I hold mine. The hand holding my live yarn remains the same, while my Tunisian hook is grasped almost like a knife, with the index finger controlling the loops on the hook. This is just how I do it – do what is comfortable and works for you!

In addition, Tunisian crochet requires a Tunisian (also sometimes called Afghan) hook, which is an specialty hook that is extra long with a stopper on the end.

Starting, Forward Pass, and Return Pass (RP)

To begin a Tunisian piece, chain the number of sts the pattern requires. This is your foundation for the following rows.

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To begin the first row, insert your hook into the single loop on the underside of the 2nd ch from the hook. Yarn over (YO) and draw up a loop.  Notice that before you do this, you already have one loop on your hook. This first loop counts as the first stitch and so you do not work into the first chain from the hook, but the second.

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Continue to draw up a loop from the back of ea ch stitch until you reach the end of the row. The action of drawing up a loop from each stitch in a Tunisian row is referred to as the Forward Pass, and counts as half of a row. (A single Tunisian row is composed of a Forward Pass and a Return Pass).

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Now that you’ve got all your loops on the hook, it’s time to work them back off with the Return Pass.

YO and draw through ONE loop. Every Return Pass in TKS crochet begins this way. Don’t forget it! All the other loops are worked off in two’s.

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YO and draw through TWO loops. Repeat yarning over and drawing through TWO loops until you reach the end of the row.

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At the end of the Return Pass, you will have one loop left on your hook. This loop counts as the first loop on the hook for the Forward Pass of the NEXT row.

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The instructions for the first row in Tunisian knit stitch is the same for the first row in Tunisian simple stitch, because you need one row of TSS to set up for the following rounds of knit stitch.

To begin the row of TKS, insert the hk through the center of the next stitch – between the two sides of the loop from the row below, and under the chain made by the return pass. Emerge the hook on the back side of the work.

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Yarn over and draw up a loop. Repeat across the row.

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dsc_0454The stitches should look like knit stitches, hence the name.

The return pass is worked the same as with TSS. To begin the return pass, YO and draw through ONE loop.

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YO and draw through TWO loops. Repeat across the row.

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Increasing:

Increasing in TKS is done ONLY on the forward pass, with the return pass worked in the same manner as usual, but with one more stitch to work off the hook.

To increase, insert your hook in the space between two stitches (with the hook entering through the front and emerging at the back) and draw up a loop. This counts as one increase and the loop is kept on the hook the same as the rest of the stitches and worked back off in the same way.

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Here’s the completed forward pass with the increase stitch highlighted.

Decreasing:

Like increases, decreases in TKS are worked in the forward pass only.

To decrease, insert your hook through the middle of two adjacent stitches, with the hook emerging at the back as normal. YO and draw up a single loop. This counts as a single decrease and the loop is kept on the hook the same as the other sts.

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The two stitches being worked through at once are highlighted here:

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Work the rest of the row onto the hook.

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Below is the completed forward pass, with the decrease stitch highlighted.

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Work the return pass as normal.

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You might notice that your little Tunisian swatch or piece wants to curl – this is normal for Tunisian and can be overcome with blocking.

I hope this tutorial has been helpful and that you are inspired to try Tunisian crochet! As I mentioned, it’s one of my favorite techniques. The fabric made by Tunisian crochet is warm, more tightly woven than regular crochet, and has a lovely texture. Also, TKS mimics knit stitches more convincingly than any other crochet stitch I know of.

I currently only have one pattern – the Tunisian ripple scarf – available in this stitch, but it’s a FREE one and there’s some video of me using TKS too. If you’d like more patterns, slam that follow button on my blog my friend! I have more coming.

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Thanks for visiting 🙂

-MF

 

 

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Tunisian Simple Stitch Tutorial

Today I’m bringing to the blog a tutorial for the style of crochet known as Tunisian (also called Afghan) crochet, a method that uses a long hook to keep multiple stitch loops on the hook before working them back off to complete them. There are many different Tunisian stitches, but one of the most basic is the Tunisian Simple Stitch (TSS). The following is a guide to creating this stitch, as well as making increases and decreases in TSS.

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This tutorial is based on my Tunisian Primer, a guide included as part of my Shaman Coat crochet pattern which utilizes Tunisian Simple Stitch! Tunisian might seem kind of daunting if you’ve never tried it, but it is one of my all-time favorite crochet styles and I really encourage you to try it if you never have 🙂

Tunisian Simple Stitch Tutorial:

The hold:

TunisianHold.jpg

Working Tunisian crochet may require a different hold than regular crochet – here’s an example of how I hold mine. The hand holding my live yarn remains the same, while my Tunisian hook is grasped almost like a knife, with the index finger controlling the loops on the hook.

In addition, Tunisian crochet requires a Tunisian (also sometimes called Afghan) hook, which is an specialty hook that is extra long with a stopper on the end.

Starting, Forward Pass, and Return Pass (RP)

To begin a Tunisian piece, chain the number of sts the pattern requires. This is your foundation for the following rows.

TSS1.jpg

To begin the first row, insert your hook into the single loop on the underside of the 2nd ch from the hook. Yarn over (YO) and draw up a loop.  Notice that before you do this, you already have one loop on your hook. This first loop counts as the first stitch and so you do not work into the first chain from the hook, but the second.

TSS2.jpg

Continue to draw up a loop from the back of ea ch stitch until you reach the end of the row. The action of drawing up a loop from each stitch in a Tunisian row is referred to as the Forward Pass, and counts as half of a row. (A single Tunisian row is composed of a Forward Pass and a Return Pass).

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Now that you’ve got all your loops on the hook, it’s time to work them back off with the Return Pass.

YO and draw through ONE loop. Every Return Pass in TSS crochet begins this way. Don’t forget it!

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YO and draw through TWO loops. Repeat yarning over and drawing through TWO loops until you reach the end of the row.

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At the end of the Return Pass, you will have one loop left on your hook. This loop counts as the first loop on the hook for the Forward Pass of the NEXT row.

To begin the next row, insert your hook under the second vertical bar on the previous row. You will NOT be inserting it into the very first vertical bar (the one on the edge) because you already have your first loop on the hook leftover from the last row, right? Right.

Your hook should enter under the stitch from the front and emerge from the front, as shown in the picture.

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YO and draw the loop through the bar. In the Shaman Coat pattern this is referred to as “picking up a lp” and a single vertical bar represents one Tunisian simple stitch.

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Repeat across the rest of the row, picking up one loop from each stitch.

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YO and draw through ONE loop. (YO and draw through TWO loops) rpt across the entire row. In the Shaman Coat pattern, the instructions for the entire return pass read “Work all sts off the hook” since the return pass is the worked the same way for every row.

Note: Tunisian crochet has a right side and a wrong side – the right side with the vertical bars will be facing you while you work TSS – tunisian pieces are not turned while working like regular crochet. 

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Two completed rows of TSS

Increasing:

Increasing in TSS is done ONLY on the forward pass, with the return pass worked in the same manner as usual, but with one more stitch to work off the hook.

To increase, insert your hook in the space between two vertical bars (with the hook entering through the front and emerging at the back) and draw up a loop. This counts as one increase and the loop is kept on the hook the same as the rest of the stitches and worked back off in the same manner.

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The picture above shows the increase highlighted after the forward pass is completed.

Decreasing:

Like increases, decreases in TSS are worked on the forward pass only.

To decrease, insert your hook under TWO adjacent sts (the vertical bars) at once. YO and draw up a single loop. This counts as a single decrease and the loop is kept on the hook the same as the other sts and worked back off in the same manner on the return pass.

You might notice that your little Tunisian swatch or piece wants to curl – this is totally normal for this type of stitch and can be overcome with blocking.

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The picture above shows the decreased sts highlighted after the forward pass is completed. You can decrease across more than two stitch at once – for instance, the Shaman Coat hood uses a double decrease that inserts the hook through three stitches at once and draws up one loop.

I hope this tutorial has been helpful and that you are inspired to try Tunisian crochet! As I mentioned, it’s one of my favorite techniques. The fabric made by Tunisian crochet is warm, more tightly woven than regular crochet, and has a lovely texture. TSS in particular creates a really pretty woven texture on the surface of the fabric. Here are some things I’ve created with Tunisian Simple Stitch:

 

The Shaman Coat

Crochet Washcloth 1

The Best Crochet Washcloth

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The Trickster Hood

Interested in more Tunisian crochet? Check out the FREE scarf pattern I created using Tunisian Knit Stitch, another basic Tunisian style.

Thanks for visiting, more to come!

-MF

 

Ivy Crown Free Crochet Pattern

I made some updates to my free Ivy Crown crochet pattern! New pictures and link to the new Ravelry database listing – enjoy 🙂

Morale Fiber

When I first worked out my little quirky leaf motif I knew I had to make a leafy crown out of it at some point – I just couldn’t find the right yarn at the hobby stores. I wanted it to be delicate and pretty, not bulky, but the yarns I tested didn’t fit the bill.

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And then the very obvious solution hit me – use THREAD, not yarn, holding two strands together to make it bigger. Yay! So without further yammering, here’s the FREE crochet pattern for this fun leafy DIY floral crown.

Update 1/25/19: This pattern has now been linked in the Ravelry pattern database! Be sure to give it a favorite if you like it 🙂

Ivy Crown Crochet Pattern

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Materials:
2.25 hook
#10 cotton crochet thread – You will need 2 cones of either the same or coordinating colors, because the pattern is worked with the…

View original post 288 more words

Winter Project Updates

Hi there! It’s not necessarily been crickets around here, but I do feel its time for some project updates of things I’ve recently completed. I haven’t had a whole lot of new things to show in the crochet category since many of the things I’ve had on the hook have been larger, longer projects that I’ve toiled at slowly in my spare time over the course of last semester. After the New Year I made it a priority to finish some of these things up so that I could MOVE. ON. FINALLY.

And so today I present two new project variations on two of my personal favorite original patterns, plus a skirt that I’d been hacking away at (literally). Prepare for photogenic twirling. There will be twirling.

Eyeball Sweater

I bought the yarn for this pattern, Yarn Bee Soft and Sleek in six different multi colorways, with some legwarmer project vaguely in mind. Well, that project was just not exciting enough to me, and so I started a chaotically rainbow version of my Spiral Sweater pattern.

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I worked it in size Small, but decreased every other stitch across the armholes to tighten up the front collar of the sweater (and also conserve yarn, which turns out was very necessary). I also skipped the Linked Double Crochet reinforcement across the back of the collar. Because I forgot. 😛

eyeball4Because I started with a central circle of solid navy leftovers that I had from a different Spiral Sweater, the middle part of the back started to look like the pupil of an eye, so I ran with that. After finishing everything on the sweater, I took some more spare yarn and slip stitched some crazy squiggles into the “iris” of the eye.

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I’ve always loved the nazar, a Middle Eastern charm symbol representing an eye, which used to ward off the evil eye.  This sweater is watching your back! Har har har.

You can find the project page, which also links to my original pattern in the righthand sidebar, here on Ravelry.  That bitchin’ tree man necklace I am wearing is from my friend Wendy’s polymer clay art shop, Dark Pony Arts – check her out, she is amazing!

 

Fairy Shawl

Though the Ida Shawl was originally designed to be multicolored, I’ve found that I really love doing them in monochromatic yarns, especially neutrals. This one is done with a DK weight acrylic yarn, Premier Everyday Baby in White, which used up all of three skeins once the fringe was finished. I really had fun plotting an outfit to go with this one.

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That’s really the only reason I do this. Excuse to dress up! Just kidding. Kind of.

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The Ida Shawl, as finicky as it was to get right during the designing process, is all the more worth it for the struggle. I still love that central design, which represents the seeds that form a star when you cut an apple in half horizontally.

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You can see this project on Ravelry too, with all of the pictures and a link to the original pattern. The leafy headwrap I am wearing is also a pattern of mine, the FREE Ivy Crown tutorial.

 

Jewel Skirt

This is the 5th skirt I’ve produced using Wendy Kay’s No-Gathers Gypsy Skirt pattern that I bought from her shop on Etsy, and this pattern has been WELL worth my money. Just chop out blocks and sew them together, no measuring (well, not much measuring) and you’ve got a beautiful dancing skirt to twirl in. Easy.. and fun!!

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I made this one from mostly upcycled fabrics, including some curtains from Goodwill and several yards of fabric I had had tucked away for YEARS that I got from a thrift market outside of the Portland Indiana Tractor and Engine show. It’s funny sometimes, when your craft supplies remind you of the places you’ve been and the other lives that you’ve lived.

I think sometimes that’s part of the appeal, for people who handmake things. It certainly is for me.

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The other skirts I’ve made I’ve given away or sold, but I think I’m keeping this one for myself. The jewel tones and floral print match nearly everything in my closet 😀

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I don’t put ALL of my sewing and refashion projects here on Morale Fiber blog, since I want the main focus here to be on crochet techniques, patterns and designs – but I do run a more personal side blog on Tumblr which I use for sewing and fashion stuff. Check me out there: Howling Mouse on Tumblr.

 

I do have more projects from over the winter that remain unfinished, plus some exciting new things budding! So I’m gonna go hustle that. As always, thank you for visiting!

-MF

P.S – I’ve gotten a lot of photo submissions of people’s projects that they have made from my designs lately – please keep that up! I love that so much! ❤ ❤ ❤ I hope you all have loved it too!