Lotus Video Tutorial Part 6

It’s finally time to debut the finishing video for the Lotus Mandala Duster pattern – Part 6, the Sleeves! I’m very happy with the response from this video series and am looking forward to exploring more video tutorial goodness so be sure to subscribe to my Youtube Channel so you can catch all the latest content πŸ™‚

Since the sleeves are written in steps instead of specifically numbered rounds, you can repeat certain steps to get the length and flare that you like in the sleeve. The video goes into this more, as well as demonstrating how to taper by placing decreases, mirror the directions on the other side, etc – I tried to hit some of the major questions I’ve been asked about this part of the pattern before! Hopefully it’s helpful.

The sleeves were my stroke of drama for this design when I first made it, and what really captured my attention. The sister design, the Lotus Vest, didn’t quite charm me the way the Duster did, and I think it’s because I just love those crazy sleeves so much.

I did eventually design a slimmer, more everyday sleeve for the Lotus Vest, which could easily be crossed with the Lotus Duster using the same techniques shown in the video, if you wanted a less burdensome arm covering πŸ˜‰

Pictured above: Lotus Vest with Cardigan Sleeve added

I’d say that it feels great to wrap up this design, but I know for a fact that I’ll still be fiddling with this pattern in the future, adding more size options and so forth. I’m nothing if not persistent, LOL!

-MF

Lotus Video Tutorial Part 5

This post won’t contain much more than the video tutorial for Part 5 of the Lotus Duster and the pictures I have of the sleeveless version finished! Still pretty good though, eh? You can find the all of the videos included in this series so far both on my blog and on my Youtube Channel.

Thank you to everyone who has liked and subscribed so far, I can tell building this channel is going to be an important part of my business so it means a lot when I get so much support ❀

Keep scrolling for the video ❀ ❀ ❀

Part Six won’t be far behind! ❀

-MF

Lotus Duster Video Tutorial Part 4

Without much preamble, I’m excited to announce the addition of Part 4 of the Lotus Mandala Duster pattern crochet tutorial to my Youtube Channel!

Thanks to everyone who has liked and subscribed so far, it really does help build my channel and therefore help me keep going with my creating πŸ™‚

You can find the video tutorial below or go to my channel to see all 4 parts released so far, as well as other awesome tutorial videos and demo. Part 4 covers Rounds 25-32, the chain-loop mesh portion of the outer sweater.

Style shown above is the Lotus Duster, without sleeves – with the Lotus Hood addition <a href="https://moralefiber.blog/2019/04/27/lotus-hood/&quot; target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" aria-label="<3

Parts 5 and 6 coming soon!

-MF

Lotus Duster Tutorial Part 3

Tippy-top on my to-do list is finishing the Lotus Duster video tutorial, in no small part because I’m getting very excited about seeing the finished product! You can find Parts 1 & 2 on my Youtube Channel here.

Each time I make a new one, I fall in love with it all over again ❀ I mean, not to toot my own horn or anything πŸ˜‰ So putting together Part 3 of this video was very rewarding, because in Rnds 17 – 24 we are adding armholes and really starting to shape the central mandala into the pretty ruffley sweater form.

This material is looking like a soft doily dream – it’s the 100% cotton yarn, in fine stranded texture, ripped out from a number of old thrifted sweaters. Recycling sweater yarn is a lot of hard work, but it’s hard to beat in terms of quality, quantity, and overall cost for these Duster pieces, and nothing gives the piece a more retro vintage-y feel than upcycled yarn.

Okay, blathering completed – enjoy Part 3 and remember to like & subscribe, link me, and share me on Facebook if you want to support more slick FREE content πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

❀ ❀

-MF

Embla Vest Pattern

It can be awfully hard to pinpoint where an idea began it’s journey toward fruition. I’ve wanted to design my own tree of life motif for years, and finally picked up a hook to start experimenting with it just a few months ago. I vaguely thought about adding the motif to the middle of the vest design I was working on, and so I tinkered until this was possible and set down a general framework for the pattern. Today I finally finish this saga, with the premier of the Embla Vest crochet pattern – available as a downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Store ❀

During the making of this pattern, life happened, and then death happened. In the course of this, the Embla Vest became very personal to me (more so than other designs, although it’s hard to judge) and getting through the process of creating this pattern became a journey of emergence. I’m so glad I’m here now! Ha πŸ™‚

The vest design itself was inspired by several stylistic sources including steampunk waistcoats and some of my personal crochet heroes’ designs, and I made SO MANY of them before I settled on what looked accurate to the vision in my mind’s eye. The resulting design is the new award winner for Most Drafts Crocheted, a title formerly held by the Ida Shawl (worth it in both cases!)

Yes, there was struggle and heartache. Through it all, I kept creating – because there isn’t any other way. I hope you love this design as much as I do, and I hope you make it for someone you love and they love it, too ❀ Read on for the full details!

The Embla Vest is a playful and versatile garment inspired by the Norse creation myth, in which the gods breath life into a dead tree to create the first woman, named Embla. I drew from many different design elements to create this unique and customizable piece of wearable crochet art.

This circular vest is worked in the round, featuring a stunning Tree of Life motif in the center and blends beautifully outwards in #4 worsted weight variegated yarn to make the perfect lightweight layering piece.

In addition to the FIVE sizes (XS-XL) this vest features lots of customizing options, including instructions for a solid back (alternative or in addition to the Tree of Life), sleeves, and hood! Create a structured, waistcoat look by working the buttons instructions, or make a fairy tail cardigan featuring a lace-up front. All sizes and styles fit with a wrapping collar, a dainty pointed back, and front panels that draw away in a figure taper.

The PDF file includes written instructions for every size in step-by-step order with stitch counts and 75+ bright, clear tutorial photos. The Embla Vest PDF also comes with the Tree of Life mandala, a separate BONUS PDF file for the full Tree of Life dreamcatcher design (also available here on the blog).

Materials:
4.5 mm hook
Lion Brand Shawl in a Cake or Shawl in a Ball (#4 weight, 150 g, 481 yds)
Main Vest: 1, 1, 1, 2, 2 skeins
Hood: Β½ Β skein
Sleeves: 1 skein
Tree Motif – 50 yds Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton (#4 weight, 100 g / 186 yds)
Scissors
Tapestry Needle
Stitch Markers

Sizes and Finished Measurements: X-Small (XS), Small (SM), Medium (MD), Large (LG), X-Large (XL)
Finished measurements are approximate
Bust: Β 30”, 34”, 38”, 42”, 46”
Length (back collar to bottom point): 19”, 21”, 23”, 25”, 27”
Arm Opening (circumference): 9”, 10”, 11”, 12”, 13”

All instructions are written in English in U.S terminology.

I have real bits of bark on my sleeve. That’s authenticity.

In the outdoor photoshoot I am proud to be sporting 100% handmade/small business apparel – here’s where it’s all from!
Floral Berry Crown: @daizel_doozle
Hi-Lo Scrunchie Dress: Elven Forest
Tie-Dye Yoga Pants: Dimples Dyes
Macrame necklace & bracelet: Selinofos Art

The sleeved vest costume also includes a piece by Dimples Dyes (halter top) and Selinofos Art (Pendant necklace). And more by me (crocheted leather feather head wrap)

And of course, in several of these photos I’m also wearing one of my one-of-a-kind pixie belts, which you can get all the how-to instructions for FREE here on my blog.

Now, go out there, make some stuff, and hug a tree.

❀ ❀ ❀

-MF

Lotus Hooded Duster

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It’s finally time! I’ve received many requests over the last few years to design a hood for my Lotus Duster free crochet pattern, and it’s been on my to-do list for long enough – today we debut the hood addition to this design! πŸ˜€

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The hood is partially made, then inserted into the main pattern rather than added after the entire thing is finished, so if you are working the Lotus Duster you will be adding the hood after Round 22, then continuing with the main pattern from there and working over the hood brim in addition to the rest of the garment. Also, I made the version pictured here sleeveless (because I wanted to wear it this summer) and I made a few adjustments to the sizing as well, which are explained in the instructions πŸ™‚

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If you like these patterns and want the portable, printable, ad-free version, good news! The Hood Tutorial is now included as a bonus PDF along with the PDF version of the Lotus Mandala Duster pattern, available in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Pattern Store! And don’t forget my offer for bundled patterns with my new pattern discount codes:
15% off of 2: MF15OFF
20% off of 3-4: MF20OFF
25% off of 5-6: MF25OFF
30% off of 7+: MF30OFF

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The pattern given for the Hood is more of a tutorial and doesn’t include specific stitch counts like the main Lotus Duster pattern does. I also used a random mishmash of yarns, some slightly bigger than I would normally use for this design, which makes a difference in sizing and gauge, etc – so I left the hood instructions open with modifications for individual gauge and preference. I considered using the standard yarn that I use for the main pattern, but I just really wanted to make this crazy thing using all these crazy yarns!

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The majority of the yarns used in this example are either upcycled by me from old sweaters (see my detailed tutorial on how to recycle sweater yarn) or rescued from the thrift store. If you liked this project, give a girl a fave over on the Ravelry project page for this design!

Oh, and those leafy wrap bracelets I am wearing are from another FREE crochet pattern of mine, the Ivy Crown garland.

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Lotus Hooded Duster

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Materials: 5.50 mm hook
Extra yarn – I would estimate the hood addition requires 300-500 yards of yarn more than the standard pattern. Please refer to the main pattern for more info on materials needed, gauge, etc.

Notes: As mentioned, I made a few tweaks to the sizing of this sleeveless duster to get the look I wanted. I started working the main pattern in size Small, then added length and width by working some of the extra rows suggested in the Large size – but not all of them, so the size came out more like a Medium.

Instructions

Work the Lotus Duster 2.0 pattern through to Round 21.

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On Rnd 22 I made an adjustment to the amount of double crochet that I worked across the chain loop that creates the armhole opening.

22. Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 1 dc in the next dc (3 dc in the next ch-1 space, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 9 times. 3 dc in the next ch-1 sp, 1 dc in the next dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 30, 33 ch sts. 1 dc in the next dc (1 dc in the next ch sp, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 9, 13 times**. 1 dc in the next ch sp, 1 dc in the next dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 30, 33 ch sts. 1 dc in the next dc (3 dc in the next ch-1 space, 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc) 63, 65 times. 3 dc in the next ch-1 sp, join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 460, 488 sts”

Instead of working 1 dc in each of the chain stitches made for the armhole loops (making 30 total dc over each armhole) I worked 20 total dc into the armhole loop itself, not the stitches. This means that the stitches can stretch across the loop made by the chains and are not anchored to the stitches themselves – to do this, just insert the hook underneath the chain loop to work your stitches across (do not insert your hook into the actual stitches, just the space underneath the chain).

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I forgot to get an actual picture at this stage, so this one is from a little later in the pattern. Still, check out how the stitches are arranged across the armhole loop space – this accomplishes a slight tightening at the bust and shoulder area and makes room for the extra draping material that will be added by the presence of the hood. If these step seems confusing or you are having trouble with sizing, it’s 100% okay to skip this step – it’s not a crucial adjustment. I just made this change because it helps keep all that pretty lacey material tucked around the shoulders for a better fit.

So with that in mind, finish Round 22 as written with or without the armhole adjustments. Once Rnd 22 is complete, set the main body of the duster aside to begin the hood.

Hood Instructions

Using the 5.50 mm hook and your yarn of choice, Chain 35.

The length you chain depends on your gauge – if you hold the chain starting at the nape of the neck, it should be long enough to reach the back of your head. If 35 is too short, chain more.

Row 1: Dc in the 4th ch from hook, ch 1, sk next st. (Dc, ch 1, sk next st) 14 times, or however many times you need to reach the second to last stitch of the chain. Dc, ch 1 in next st. In the last st of the chain, work (Dc, ch 1) 3 times. Rotate the piece so that you are working into the bottom of the chain stitches, creating a chain with stitches on both sides. Dc, ch 1 in the next st, sk next st. (Dc, ch 1, sk next st) 14 times. Dc in next st. Dc in the final st.

Row 2:  Ch 4 (counts as first dc + ch 1), turn. (Dc in next ch -1 space, ch 1) 16 times. (Dc, ch 1) twice in ea of the next 2 ch-1 spaces. (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 16 times. Dc in the final dc of the previous row.

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The central chain at the back of the hood
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The instructions in bold create two increase spaces at the tip of one end of the piece. Through the next part, you will work the same kind of increase in each of these two increase spaces on every row – so it’s helpful to mark them!

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Row 3: Ch 3 (counts as first dc), turn. (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 17 times. (Dc, ch 1) twice in the next space. Dc, ch 1 in the next space. (Dc, ch 1) twice in the next space. (Dc in the next space, ch 1) 16 times. 1 dc in the final ch-1 space, 1 dc in the final dc of the previous row.

Row 4: Ch 4 (counts as first dc + ch 1). (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 18 times. (Dc, ch 1) twice in the next space. Dc, ch 1 in each of the next 2 spaces. (Dc, ch 1) twice in the next space. (Dc in the next space, ch 1) 18 times.  Dc in the final dc of the previous row.

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Side profile of the hood addition, folded in half – at 9 rows

Keep working in this same manner, placing increases at the two increase points on every row, until your hood has 11 total rows (or until the hood is tall enough to reach the top of your head).

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The next few rows skip the increases to add depth to the hood without adding more height. You can repeat the next two rows as many times as you like to get the depth of hood that you want/need, but remember that since there are still 15 rounds left in the main pattern that will add height and depth to the hood, so you really don’t need this part to be a fully functioning hood yet.

Row 12: Ch 4 (counts as first dc + ch 1). (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) in each space across. Dc in the final dc of the previous row.

Row 13: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). (Dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) across. 1 dc in the final ch space, 1 dc in the final dc of the previous row.

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Once your hood addition is completed, cut your yarn and tie off. Now we are going to  attach the hood to the work-in-progress main body of the duster.

My hood addition when finished by itself is about 20″ across the bottom, and 12″ at the highest point. 

Attaching the Hood

On the main duster, use a stitch marker to mark the central dc between the armholes. I do this by counting how many v-stitches are in the row below, then finding the central v-stitch or space between v-stitches – the double crochet above will be the central point. Align the hood’s flat edge with this point, matching the end of the foundation chain to the middle point marked on the duster.

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Attach yarn, insert hook through both the vest and the hood at the central point. Work a sc in ea dc through the hood, working 2 attaching stitches for the side of every DC at the end of a row. This was 25 stitches for me to get to the end of the hood.

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Half the hood is now attached – now we start on the other side and attach the opposite half.

Count out the amount of sts needed for the other side. Cut yarn and reattach at this point, then work toward the central point using the same strategy to attach.

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Of course, you can always just whip stitch the hood onto the main duster if using a crocheted method of attaching seems like too much bother. I prefer a stitched seam here because the hood is going to be resisting against the weight of the rest of the duster (which is not light) and I want the seam to be strong and not stretch too much.

Once your hood is attached in whichever fashion you prefer, cut your yarn and tie off. It’s time to pick back up where we left off on the main body of the duster at Round 23. Only now, we will be working all the rest of the rounds across the brim of the hood as well as around the main body.

“23. Ch 3 – counts as first dc. (Sk next three sts, 1 dc in the next st. Ch 3, 1 dc in the same st) 114, 121 times. Sk next three sts, dc in the next st, ch 1. Hdc in the 3rd ch of beg ch-3 to join.”

Round 23 creates V-stitches all around the garment – to work the first round that includes the hood, work a V-stitch over the arm opening stitches as  instructed…

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Then work a V-stitch in every other ch-1 space around the brim of the hood addition.

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Continue the round across the entire brim of the hood, and then around the main body as well, using the instructions given. Remember that because of the hood addition, your stitch counts will not be the same as given in the main pattern.

Once Round 23 is complete, all remaining rounds can be worked as written in the main Lotus Duster pattern, just working around the entire body including the hood! One more consideration is the half-rounds at Rnd 35 and 36 – because you have added a hood, you’ll have to recalculate what amount of stitches constitutes the top half of the garment and then work the half-rounds across that amount of stitches, not the amount given in the main pattern.

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To calculate this number, count the total number of stitches in Rnd 34, then divide that number by half. Beginning with the Rnd 34 join at the side of the duster, count out your V-stitches that equal half of the total. Mark the final stitch of this set, then work Row 35 and 36 only on that portion following the instructions given. For my duster vest, half of the total equalled 224 V-stitches.

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Once the garment in completed, I cut the yarn and wove in the ends. I added the slip stitching necessary to anchor the ties as shown in the main pattern, then added two braided ties on each side.

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Since I left this version sleeveless, I finished the armholes with a row of dc around the inside.

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I really love this particular version of the Lotus Duster – the lack of sleeves makes it a good garment for warmer weather, but the hood and the length make it mysterious and costume-y enough to be a stunning festival piece! In my tradition of naming these after female singer songwriters, I’m calling this baby “Florence.” ❀

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The polymer clay horns and woodland tree spirit pendant I am wearing in this shoot came from my amazing friend Wendy Davies from Dark Pony Art – please check out her art and give her a like on her Facebook Page!

If you like my designs, you can head over to my Facebook Page too and hit that follow button!

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As always, I’m filled with gratitude for everyone who likes, comments, shares, and creates my designs! I can’t help but remember a time when where I am at now seemed beyond my wildest imaginings ❀ And it’s all possible because of you magical beings out there who support me, thank you so much ❀ I am honored to create with you!

-MF

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Mandala Tam Free Pattern

 

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The free pattern I’m offering today is a rework of a design I’ve been using for ages! I started making these netted caps way back when I had white girl dreads, to keep my hair out of my way while traveling. After I got rid of the ‘locks, I kept using this style of hat as a pretty way to keep damp hair out of the cold or just when I didn’t feel like messing with the tresses at all πŸ˜›

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This pattern was formerly my Mini Mandala Slouchy Tam, which was initially a paid pattern. However, I felt it needed updated and decided to offer it in its newest version for free on my blog instead of as a PDF – but it still has all the same features, including THREE sizes (the largest size fits quite a large amount of hair), fun and easy written instructions, and a quick finishing time to get a really useful and pretty little accessory!

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Materials:
5.00 mm hook, 6.50 mm hook
Yarn: Any #4 weight yarn, 1-2 skeins – yarn pictured is Red Heart Unforgettable Waves.
Main Gauge: 3 ½” in diameter at the end of Rnd 3
Post Stitch Gauge: 6 sts = 2” in FPDC/BPDC pattern Make sure to check your gauge and use hook size needed to obtain gauge listed.

Techniques:

Chain (ch)
Double Crochet (dc)
Single Crochet (sc)
Half Double crochet (hdc)
Post Stitches: See my tutorial here.
Chain and stitch join: A technique that uses a combination of chain stitches and regular crochet stitches to form the last loop of a mesh round – more detailed instructions are available in my tutorial here.

Notes:Β Photo tutorial is available for small size – many of the round techniques are the same throughout the sizes, so refer to size small for pictures πŸ™‚

Mandala Tam – Small

Ch 5.
Rnd 1: (Dc, ch 1) 11 times into the 5th ch from the hook. Join with a sl stitch in to the 3rd ch of beginning ch4. – 12 dc, 12 ch-1 sps

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Rnd 2: (Sc into the next ch-1 space, ch 4) 11 times. Sc into the next ch-1 space, ch 1. Dc into the first sc of the round. This creates a ch-4 sized loop with your hook positioned at the middle of the space. (For more instructions on how to do this type of join, check out my Chain and Stitch Join Tutorial) – 12 loops

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Rnd 3: Sc in the same space, ch 4. (Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 4) 10 times. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 1. Dc in the first sc of the round. – 12 loops

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Rnd 4: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). Dc in the same space, ch 4. (2 dc in the next ch-4 space, ch 4) 10 times. 2 dc in the next ch-4 space, ch 1, dc in the 3rd chain of beg ch-3. – 24 dc, 12 ch-4 sps

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Rnd 5: Sc in the same space, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5, sc in the same space, ch 5. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5) 5 times. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5, sc in the same space, ch 2. Dc in the first sc of the round. – 18 ch-5 loops

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Rnd 6: Sc in the same space, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 5) 16 times. Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 2. Dc in the first sc of the round. – 18 ch-5 loops
Rnd 7: Rpt Rnd 6.

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Rnd 8: Rpt round 6.
Rnd 9: Sc in the same space, ch 4. (Sc in the next chain space, ch 4) 16 times. Sc in the next chain space, ch 1, dc in the first sc of the round. – 18 ch-4 loops

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Rnd 10: Rpt Rnd 9
Rnd 11: Rpt Rnd 9
Rnd 12: Sc in the same space, ch 3. (Sc in the next chain space, ch 3) 16 times. Sc in the next chain space, ch 1, hdc in the first sc of the round. – 18 ch-3 loops
Rnd 13: Rpt round 12.
Rnd 14: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). Dc in the same sp. (Dc in the next sc, 3 dc in the next ch-3 space) 17 times. Dc in the next sc, 1 dc in the next chain space. Join with a sl stitch to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 72 Dc

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Rnd 15: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), FPDC in the same stitch. 1 FPDC in ea of the next2 sts. (1 BPDC in ea of the next 3 sts, 1 FPDC in ea of the next 3 sts) 11 times. 1 BPDC in ea of the next 3 sts. Join with a sl st in the top of the first FPDC of the round.

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Rnd 16: Rpt round 15.
Rnd 17: Slip stitch loosely in each stitch around. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.
Position the button over the join stitches where the beginning and end of the last round meets and sew on using the yarn tail. Weave in all ends.

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Strap:
With a 6.50 mm hook

Row 1: Join new yarn into the side of the post stitches 15 stitches away. 2 dc in the side of the first stitch, 1 dc in the side of the next st, 1 dc in the side of the next st.
Rows 2-4: Ch 3, turn. Dc in the next 4 stitches.

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Row 5: Ch 3, turn. Dc3tog over the next 3 sts. Dc in the last st.

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Row 6: Turn without chaining, slip st in the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Weave in all ends. Use the spaces between the double crochet stitches to slip over your button and tighten the hat as necessary.
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Mandala Tam – Medium (Slouchy)

Ch 5.
Rnd 1: (Dc, ch 1) 11 times into the 5th ch from the hook. Join with a sl stitch in to the 3rd ch of beginning ch4. – 12 dc, 12 ch-1 sps
Rnd 2: (Sc into the next ch-1 space, ch 4) 11 times. Sc into the next ch-1 space, ch 1. Dc into the first sc of the round. This creates a ch-4 sized loop with your hook positioned at the middle of the space. (For more instructions on how to do this type of join, check out my Chain and Stitch Join Tutorial) – 12 loops
Rnd 3: Sc in the same space, ch 4. (Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 4) 10 times. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 1. Dc in the first sc of the round. – 12 loops
Rnd 4: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). Dc in the same space, ch 4. (2 dc in the next ch-4 space, ch 4) 10 times. 2 dc in the next ch-4 space, ch 1, dc in the 3rd chain of beg ch-3. – 24 dc, 12 ch-4 sps
Rnd 5: Sc in the same space, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5, sc in the same space, ch 5. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5) 5 times. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5, sc in the same space, ch 2. Dc in the first sc of the round. – 18 ch-5 loops
Rnd 6: Sc in the same space, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 5) 16 times. Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 2. Dc in the first sc of the round. – 18 ch-5 loops
Rnd 7-9: Rpt Rnd 6.
Rnd 10: Sc in the same space, ch 4. (Sc in the next chain space, ch 4) 16 times. Sc in the next chain space, ch 1, dc in the first sc of the round. – 18 ch-4 loops
Rnd 11-13: Rpt Rnd 10
Rnd 14: Sc in the same space, ch 3. (Sc in the next chain space, ch 3) 16 times. Sc in the next chain space, ch 1, hdc in the first sc of the round. – 18 ch-3 loops
Rnd 15: Rpt round 14.
Rnd 16: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). Dc in the same sp. (Dc in the next sc, 3 dc in the next ch-3 space) 17 times. Dc in the next sc, 1 dc in the next chain space. Join with a sl stitch to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 72 Dc
(See tutorial on post stitches located below the pattern for instructions on FPDC and BPDC)
Rnd 17: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), FPDC in the same stitch. 1 FPDC in ea of the next 2 sts. (1 BPDC in ea of the next 3 sts, 1 FPDC in ea of the next 3 sts) 11 times. 1 BPDC in ea of the next 3 sts. Join with a sl st in the top of the first FPDC of the round.
Rnd 18: Rpt round 17.
Rnd 19: Slip stitch loosely in each stitch around. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.
Position the button over the join stitches where the beginning and end of the last round meets and sew on using the yarn tail. Weave in all ends.

Strap:
With a 6.50 mm hook

Row 1: Join new yarn into the side of the post stitches 15 stitches away. 2 dc in the side of the first stitch, 1 dc in the side of the next st, 1 dc in the side of the next st.
Rows 2-4: Ch 3, turn. Dc in the next 4 stitches.
Row 5: Ch 3, turn. Dc3tog over the next 3 sts. Dc in the last st.
Row 6: Turn without chaining, slip st in the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Weave in all ends.

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Mandala Tam –Β  Large (Slouchiest)

Kendrahat1KendraHat3

As you can see, this tam fits A LOT of hair underneath! Great for the really dready folks out there πŸ™‚

Ch 5.
Rnd 1: (Dc, ch 1) 11 times into the 5th ch from the hook. Join with a sl stitch in to the 3rd ch of beginning ch-4.
Rnd 2: (Sc into the next ch-1 space, ch 4) 11 times. Sc into the next ch-1 space, ch 2. Hdc into the first sc of the round. This creates a ch-4 sized loop with your hook positioned at the middle of the space.
Rnd 3: Sc in the same ch-4 space, ch 4. (Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 4) 10 times. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 2. Hdc in the first sc of the round.
Rnd 4: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). Dc in the same space, ch 4. (2 dc in the next ch-4 space, ch 4) 10 times. 2 dc in the next ch-4 space, ch 1, dc in the 3rd chain of beg ch-3.
Rnd 5: Repeat round 4.
Rnd 6: Sc in the same space, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5, sc in the same space, ch 5. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5) 5 times. Sc in the next ch-4 space, ch 5, sc in the same space, ch 2. Dc in the first sc of the round.
Rnd 7: Sc in the same space, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 5) 16 times. Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 2. Dc in the first sc of the round.
Rnd 8: Sc in the same space, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 5, sc in the same space, ch 5. Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 5) 8 times. Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 5, sc in the same space, ch 2. Dc in the first sc of the round.
Rnd 9: Sc in the same space, ch 5. (Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 5) 26 times. Sc in the next ch-5 space, ch 2. Dc in the first sc of the round.
Rnds 10-13: Rpt round 9.
Rnd 14: Sc in the same space, ch 4. (Sc in the next chain space, ch 4) 26 times. Sc in the next chain space, ch 1, dc in the first sc of the round.
Rnd 15-18: Rpt round 14.
Rnd 19: Sc in the same space, ch 3. (Sc in the next chain space, ch 3) 26 times. Sc in the next chain space, ch 1, hdc in the first sc of the round.
Rnds 20 – 23: Rpt round 19.
Rnd 24: Ch 3. (Dc in the next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-3 space) 27 times. Dc in the next sc, 1 dc in the next chain space. Join with a sl stitch to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3.
Rnd 25: Ch 3, FPDC in the same stitch. 1 FPDC in ea of the next 2 sts. (1 BPDC in ea of the next 3 sts, 1 FPDC in ea of the next 3 sts) 13 times. 1 FPDC in ea of the next 3 sts. Join with a sl st in the top of the first FPDC of the round.
Rnd 26: Rpt round 25.
Rnd 27: Slip stitch in each stitch around. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Strap:
With a 6.50 mm hook

Row 1: Join new yarn into the side of the post stitches 15 stitches away. 2 dc in the side of the first stitch, 1 dc in the side of the next st, 1 dc in the side of the next st.
Rows 2-4: Ch 3, turn. Dc in the next 4 stitches.
Row 5: Ch 3, turn. Dc3tog over the next 3 sts. Dc in the last st.
Row 6: Turn without chaining, slip st in the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Weave in all ends.

MandalaTam14

I hope you find this hat as useful and cute as I do! As you can see, I like to go back and give old designs a fresh coat of paint when I think they need it – its one of the ways I really enjoy my work, because I get to revisit things I love and reinvent them continually.

-MF

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