Basic Bralette Tutorial

DSC_0083

When dreaming up this little design, I had some specific requirements in mind: that it be a simple “base” pattern from which many variations could be made, as well as being easily customized for many sizes, and last but not least – comfortable! After a few experiments, the pattern for the Basic Bralette was born.

DSC_0093.JPG

I went with in-the-round triangle style cups for both the way they look and the ease of adjusting their size, plus a band through which the cross-back ties thread so that there is no pressure being put on the neck as with traditional bikini-style strap ties.

DSC_0059.JPG

BB1

DSC_0096.JPG

Cross back ties are totally my jam now – check out the recently released Plus Size Mehndi Halter for more proof! In addition, I added a bit of strappy flair along the inner cups, because TRENDY. Say hello to your next cute and comfy summer crochet project!

DSC_0069.JPG

Now, there’s a teeny bit of math involved, fair warning. However, if you are confused about gauge and measurements, I’m here to help – or just wing it, and use the old “hold it up against yourself periodically while you work” method. πŸ™‚

DSC_0104.JPG

By the way, that awesome macrame necklace I am wearing is from Selinofos Art on Etsy – you should check them out!

This design is also listed on Ravelry, so if you like it, throw a girl a favorite on the project page!

BBcover1

Basic Bralette Tutorial Pattern

3.50 mm hook
#4 weight cotton yarn (although you can make it with any weight yarn / hook size combo as long as you know your gauge!) 1-3 skeins depending on size made
Stitch markers
Scissors & Tapestry Needle
Measuring Tape

Measurements
Band Size (measured around the rib cage just under the bust): For example, my measurement would be 32”
Measurement A : (Band size β€œ / 4) – 2” = Length of each side of completed triangle cup ( My example would be [32 / 4] – 2 = 6”). Therefore, my Measurement A = 6″

Measurement B: Β (Measurement A) / 2 = My Measurement B would be 3”

Note that the sample in the pictures doesn’t use the same measurements as my example math above.

Gauge:

You can have differing gauges for this project, as long as you know what your gauge is in order to achieve the right measurements.

My gauge with the given hook and yarn is:
9 sts & 4 rows = 2” in dc

To find your gauge, crochet a square of double crochet stitches about 15-20 sts long and about 6 rows tall.

DSC_0050

Use a measuring tape to find out how many dc sts per inch/es in your gauge swatch.

DSC_0051

Measure vertically to find out how many rows per inch/es in your gauge swatch. My swatch has 9 sts in every 2 inches (measured by 2 inches because we don’t want to have 4.5 sts per inch because it’s not a whole number) and 4 rows for every 2 inches, so my gauge is 9 sts and 4 rows = 2″ in dc.

Instructions:

Triangle Cups (Make 2)

Make Magic Ring to begin.

DSC_0852.JPG

Rnd 1: Ch 2 (does not count as first st), (3 dc into the ring, ch 2) 3 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 9 dc

DSC_0853.JPG

DSC_0854.JPG

Rnd 2: Ch 2, 1 dc into the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) repeat within parentheses twice. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 21 dc

DSC_0855.JPG

DSC_0856.JPG

DSC_0858

Rnd 3: Ch 2, 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 7 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) rpt within parentheses twice. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 33 dc

DSC_0859.JPG

Rnd 4: Ch 2, 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 6 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 11 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) rpt within parentheses twice. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 dc. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 45 dc

Continue working in pattern until the sides of your triangle each match yourΒ Measurement A. Remember that this piece will stretch, so you may want your sides to be just a little under this measurement to account for that.Β 

It’s also a good idea to grab the 3 corners of your triangle and stretch them out evenly as you are working, so you get a better idea of how your length is progressing!

I made this sample piece around 8”, and so wrote out the following rounds I used to get that measurement in my gauge – but you can work as many or as few rounds in pattern as you need.

Rnd 5: Ch 2, 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 15 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) rpt within parentheses twice. 1 dc in ea of the next 6 dc. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 57 dc

Rnd 6: Ch 2, 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 19 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) rpt within parentheses twice. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 dc. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 69 dc

After finishing the first triangle, cut yarn and tie off. Complete a second triangle, butΒ  leave yarn attached when finished.

DSC_0861.JPG

 

Arrange the two triangles (which we will now refer to as cups) with RS facing, your hook positioned on top, so that the two flat sides with the joins are facing β€œup”. Take a locking stitch marker and run it through each chain st on the corner where the two cups meet.

DSC_0935

DSC_0936.JPG

DSC_0937.JPG

DSC_0938.JPG

These two ch sts will be worked together as one stitch, now referred to as the middle point. Now, count the number of dc stitches between where your hook is positioned to the middle point, counting neither the joined stitch nor the middle point stitch – I have 12 in the sample.

DSC_0939.JPG

Take a second marker, count out the same number of stitches on the opposite cup away from the middle point, then mark the next st (so you have a section between the middle point and the marked stitch equal to the section on the other side).

DSC_0941.JPG

From the point where your hook is positioned, you will work 1/3 the amount of stitches (between your hook and the middle point) in sc, 1/3 in hdc, 1/3 dc for the first section – in the example this is 4 sc, 4 hdc, 4 dc. If 1/3rd of your number is not a whole number, round down and add the extra stitches into the dc total. So, if you have 14 stitches in this section, you’d do 4 sc, 4 hdc, 6 dc (4 dc + 2 extra = 6).

DSC_0946.JPG

Next, 1 dc into the middle stitch, working your stitch through both ch stitches at once. In the next section, work the same quantities of stitches, except mirrored – in the example this is 4 dc, 4 hdc, 4 sc. Sl st in the next stitch (with the marker). Cut yarn and tie off. Remove all markers.

DSC_0947.JPG

DSC_0948

Band:

For the band, we will add the length of stitches equal to Measurement B on either side. The Measurement B for this sample is 4”, so since my gauge is 9 sts = 2”, I will need to add 18 stitches to either side of the cups.

Row 1: Ch length of stitches needed to equal Measurement B (18 here). Dc in the 2nd ch in the corner of the cup, RS facing. Dc in ea st across to the next ch st on opposite corner, ch number same number of stitches as beginning.

DSC_0949

DSC_0950

DSC_0953

Row 2: Ch 2, turn and work 1 dc in the 4th ch from the hook (first 3 ch sts count as first dc). 1 dc in ea st across.

DSC_0955

DSC_0956

Row 3: Ch 3, turn (counts as first dc). 1 dc in ea st across.

Rpt Row 3 until the band is the width that you’d like, and totals an even number of rows. Β (I did 6 total rows of dc). Do not tie off.

The next part works around the entire top to create eyelets in the back and add the straps.Β 

Round 4:Β  Rotate the piece so that you are ready to work into the row ends of the band. Ch 4 (counts as first dc + ch1). (Dc, ch 1) in the side of each dc at the row ends, across the side of the band. In the last row, work 1 dc into the very edge of the stitch, skip the chain 1.

DSC_0959.JPG

DSC_0960.JPG

Rotate the piece,Β  beginning to work across the top of the band. Ch 1, hdc in the side of the dc of the eyelet row. 1 hdc in ea stitch across, stopping one st before the Row 1 dc at the bottom of the cups. Skip this stitch, the dc, and the chain space at the corner of the cup, 1 hdc in the next dc on the side of the cup (For larger cups or for tighter coverage, you may want to skip a few extra stitches to keep the cup edges tight – I skipped about 5 total stitches on mine). 1 hdc in ea dc toward the top of the cup. 1 hdc, 1 dc in the next chain space.

DSC_0962

DSC_0963

 

DSC_0967

Strap: Ch 200 – 300 (depending on bust size – each strap will go over the shoulder, cross the back, and then criss-cross back and forth. You may want to cross more or less, like a certain level of tightness, etc – so there is no solid rule about how many to chain here. My default is to chain more than I need, then undo part of the chain later once I’ve tried the top on and know how long I need the chain to actually be). Cut yarn and tie off.

DSC_0971

Rejoin yarn 6 chain stitches away from the top of the cup. Slip stitch in ea of the next 4 sts toward the top of the cup, stopping before the last ch st. Ch 1. 1 dc, 1 hdc in the chain space. 1 hdc in the next dc.

DSC_0972

DSC_0975

DSC_0976

Chain a number of stitches until you have just enough length to get the end of the chain to the middle of the two cups – typically equal to the amount of stitches you are about to skip (depending on gauge). Skip working the rest of the cup and sc in the stitch in the middle.

Note that the chain length pictured in the image directly below is too loose! I made it longer so that it would be more visible in the photograph. It should sit tightly along the edge of the cup once secured at the middle point, as pictured in the second image below.

DSC_0978.JPG

DSC_0980

Repeat length of chain, skip side of next cup, 1 hdc in the dc right before the chain space. You will want your chains here to be fairly tight, to avoid floppy straps. Now is a good time to practice the “holding it up to yourself as you work” method, since each bust is different.

DSC_0981.JPG

1 hdc in the next ch space, 1 dc in the same space. Work a second chain strap equal in length to the first. Cut yarn, tie off, and rejoin 6 sts away from the last dc. Slip stitch in the next 4 sts, ch 1, 1 dc in the same ch space, 1 hdc in the same space.

DSC_0983.JPG

1 hdc in ea dc down the side of the cup. Sk next chain corner, dc, and first st at the top of the band (or as many as you skipped on the opposite side). 1 hdc in ea st across to the corner.

DSC_0984

Rotate piece, ch 4 (counts as first dc + ch-1). (Dc, ch 1) in ea dc at the ends of the rows of the band. In the last st, 1 dc at the very edge, sk chain.

DSC_0985

DSC_0986

Rotate piece to begin working across the bottom of the band again. Ch 1, 1 hdc in the side of the last dc worked for eyelet row. 1 hdc in ea st across the bottom of the band, stopping at the ch-3 that counts as the first dc for the eyelet row. 1 sc in the next st, sl st in the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

DSC_0987

DSC_0988

DSC_0990

Weave in all ends, except for the ends of the chain straps.

Now, put on the top and cross the chain straps at the back as shown. You can criss-cross string the straps through all the eyelets, or just some of them – though the more criss-crossing you do, the harder it is to adjust the straps to the right tightness of fit by yourself. So, I normally only cross them a couple times (see the images of the red bralette below)Β  πŸ™‚Β  Whichever way you decide, you can then see how much strap length you actually need.

DSC_0097.JPG

DSC_0014

DSC_0015

DSC_0016

Pick out the tie-off you made, and rip out the extra chain stitches until your straps are the length that you need. Tie off again and cut off the extra yarn.

DSC_0017

DSC_0019

DSC_0021

I used my extra yarn to make little tassels, which is both cute and helps hide the yarn tail at the end of the chain so that I don’t have to weave it in πŸ™‚ Voila! Your Basic Bralette is born.

DSC_0070

DSC_0067

DSC_0088

DSC_0109

I plan on doing some variations on this design in the future! Armed with a ton of colorful cotton yarn, this quick and easy project should be fun to mess around with some more – and I’ll try to share what I come up with of course ❀

-MF

BBcover2

Advertisements

Plus Size Mehndi Halter Top

PlusMehndi1

Though it’s been two years since I first published the Mehndi Halter Top design, I’ve never stopped wanting to create the plus size version – like I did with the Sol Halter and the Plus Size Sol – but for some reason it just took me a while πŸ™‚ Everything in its own time, amiright? At any rate, the pattern is finally ready and available in my Ravelry Pattern Store and my Etsy Shop for 5.50 USD!

PlusMehndiCover1.jpg

The Mehndi Halter Top pattern draws inspiration from the thick lotus petal motifs, linework, and dot borders in traditional henna design. Made in bright #4 weight cotton yarn, this pom-pom fringed top makes a unique addition to dance costumes, festival wear, or your next beach adventure!

The Plus Size version is designed for bigger busts, utilizing a cross-back tie for adjustability and comfort. The band size is 26” at the bottom of the halter with a height of 10″ from top of cups to bottom of the halter (not including the trim). The cross-back ties are 55″ and thread through loops at the side, taking the weight off of the back of the neck as with traditional halter tops.

PlusMehndi4

As usual, detailed instructions and stitch counts are included in the written pattern, as well was lots of detailed step-by-step photos!

Materials needed:

Hobby Lobby I Love This Cotton (#4, 3.5 oz/180 yds) – 2 skeins Color A, plus 1 coordinating color
3.50 mm hook
Stitch Marker
Scissors
Tapestry Needle

All instructions written in English and in US terminology.

I really hope you love making & wearing this one! My goal was to put it out by the end of May, and I’m squeaking it in right under the line πŸ˜‰ Because I love you! πŸ™‚

-MF

Window Box Sweater Pattern

Whew! The month of April – or Third February as I am calling it this year – is almost over, and I can’t say I’m too sad about it. I’ve been busily chipping away at final papers and such, but I did find enough time to complete a new (easy) crochet pattern design!

WindowBox8

It’s a super cute hippie-flavored crop sweater, the perfect topper for any lingering spring chill. The Window Box SweaterΒ  is designed with easy-level crocheters in mind, and is available with 3 sizes – all in one pattern for 5.50 USD through my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Pattern Store – with a special introductory SALE for $1 off running through Monday, April 30 with the coupon code “WINDOW1”.Β  Read on for more details about the pattern!

WindowBox10

WindowCover2

The Window Box Sweater is an airy layering piece full of movement and attitude! The trendy cropped length and loose fit is balanced by fun flared bell sleeves and a retro square collar.

Easy, in-the-round construction means no bulky seams or complicated finishing, and tons of tutorial photos make it a cinch to follow along even for inexperienced garment makers. This sweater is a quick project featuring simple stitches and a large hook, and the cotton DK weight yarn held double creates a trendy bold texture without sacrificing drape and softness.

The Window Box Sweater has THREE sizes, all written in detailed instructions with stitch counts for every size – no guesswork or vague modifying instructions!

Sizes:
Small: 38” Bust, 14” length, 26” sleeves
Medium: 42” Bust, 14” length, 26” sleeves
Large: 46” Bust, 15” length, 27” sleeves

Materials
6.50 mm hook
4 Stitch Markers
Scissors & Tapestry Needle

Yarn
2 Strands any DK weight held together: 1100 yds (1300 yds, 1500 yds) – 4 skeins Premier Cotton Fair or Universal Yarns Bamboo Pop

Instructions are written in English, using US crochet terminology.

WindowBox14

WindowBox9WindowBox2WindowCover3

Man, it was really hard to sit on this one until it was ready to release – I’m so excited its finally out! πŸ™‚Β  Now on to the next one, of course!

-MF

 

Wayfarer Ruana

ruanapin

When I began drafting this post over a year ago, it was to take notes on my first attempt at some of the beautiful and colorful knit ruanas I had seen floating around online. Unfortunately for me, that first attempt (which took over a year for me to finish!) just didn’t turn out. It happens. The final product was pretty, but just too big to conceivably wear, even after several attempts at damage control. It makes an incredible blanket, however.Β  And since the point was to use up small scraps of leftover yarn, it was indeed effective.

DSCN7890

DSCN7891

And yet somehow that bag of scrap yarn remained full for the entirety of the two years I’ve been developing this πŸ˜›

Maybe it wasn’t so unfortunate. After all, I had an incentive to try to do it again, and this time I had a few additional touches I was excited about trying. So, I started the NEXT one. Good thing too, because if there is one thing I love to have around, it’s a big colorful knitting project that requires zero brainpower.

ruana5

My favorite projects do tend to involve recycling and reusing stuff, and this thing has supreme scrapbusting capabilities. Especially on the two skinnier front panels, you can really use up fairly small lengths of leftover yarn with ease, because you don’t have to weave in those ends! At least, not as many ends as you’d think, as long as you change yarns at the end of the row. I mostly hit the mark on this, usually with just a yard or two to spare on whatever tiny yarn ball I was using. Occasionally I gambled on a small length and lost, and had to change mid-row.

ruana4

Since the yarn ends on the outside edges of the ruana are left knotted and then blended in with the added fringe, you save a ton of time doing that much-maligned finishing work. But you still have to weave in the ends for the grannies πŸ˜›

ruanacover8

I hope you enjoy the free tutorial I whipped up for this project – it’s more of a guide than a pattern, since the dimensions/materials/yardages are left somewhat variable and a lot of it is open for (and it fact demands) personal interpretation and creativity! Of course, if you have any questions about how I did mine, don’t hesitate to ask πŸ™‚ And, if you like it, throw me a favorite on the Ravelry project page.

ruanacover7

Oh, and this thing is COZY. Basically this wrap cocoons you in soothing waves of color and texture and mind-melds you with the universe. Basically.

ruanacover2

ruanacover9

Wayfarer Ruana

ruanacover11

Final dimensions: Roughly 65″ x 65″ when laid flat.

Materials:

Part 1 (Knit):

8 mm (US size 11) knitting needles (24″ circular and 40″ circular)
A whole buncha yarn – I used mostly #4 and #5 weight from leftovers. If you’ve got thinner yarn you want to use up, remember you can always double it up with another strand! I used 4 skeins of a silver bulky weight (I Love This Chunky from Hobby Lobby) as my “base” yarn, using a little in the main body and 3 skeins for the trims and collar.

Part 2 (Crochet):
4.50 mm crochet hook
DK weight yarn – I used a variety of colors (20 skeins) from Drops Lima, a wool/alpaca blend, and had plenty left over.

Tapestry Needle
Scissors

Techniques:

Part 1 (Knit):
Cast on (CO)
K (knit)
P (purl)
Stretchy bind off (tutorial video here)
Standard bind off
Picking up stitches from the edge of the row (tutorial video here)
Not absolutely necessary but I found to beΒ extremely helpful: this tutorial on speed knitting by RJ Knits.

Part 2 (Crochet):
Magic Ring (MR)
Double crochet (dc)
Chain (ch)
Slip stitch (sl st)
Granny square join-as-you-go (great tutorial here)

Part 1 Instructions: The Main Body

Using spare balls of scrap yarn / orphan skeins / leftover yarns

1.CO 50 sts to the 24″ circular knitting needles
2. Turn, K every stitch across
3. Rpt Step 2, changing yarn at the end of the row whenever you think you don’t have enough for another full row (or whenever you feel like it). Tie the old yarn tail and the new yarn tail into a knot. Work until you have 130 rows. Transfer your piece to a stitch holder – this completes the first front panel, one of the two skinny halves of the front.

4. For the second front panel, repeat Steps 1-3 until you have another full 50 st x 130 row piece.

5. Switch to your 40″ circulars and knit your first rectangle onto the new circulars. Cast on 10 extra stitches, then knit your second rectangle on. You now have both of your front panels, plus 10 new stitches in between for the collar, on the 40″ circular needles.

ruana3

Close-up of the collar area

6. Turn, knit every stitch across, continuing to change & knot yarn as before. Work 130 total rows.

ruana2

5. Bind off. My favorite is the stretchy bind-off, directions for which are in this great video from Knitting with Cheryl Brunette.

Trim:

1. Using the the 40″ circular, pick up sts along the edge of the piece – I used myΒ  bulky “base” yarn and got about 180 stitches (1 stitch per 2 rows). Here’s a great videoΒ from the indomitable Purl Soho on picking up stitches from the side of garter stitch rows.

ruana11

Picking up stitches from the side of the rows, front side

ruana12

Picking up stitches from the side of the rows – view from the back. Notice the ridge formed by the side of the rows on this side – this is where we will attach the extra fringe later.

2. K for 10 rows. Bind off using the standard method – to make the Part 2 joining easier, I would not recommend stretchy bind-off here.

3. Repeat trim on the other side, making sure that you work the second edge with the same side facing, positioning all ends to the back of your work (so that the fringe will be all on the same side).

Collar:

ruana13

1.Β  With 40″ circular needles, pick up stitches on the side of the rows beginning on the inside of the front panel up to the collar, then around and down the inside of the of the opposite panel (remember only 1 stitch per 2 rows)

From this row of picked up stitches we’ll work a 4×4 rib. If you are picky about not ending up with partial ribs, you could go to the trouble to make sure the amount of stitches you pick up is divisible by four, but I didn’t – and was divisible by four anyway! Lucky me.

ruana14

2. For the 4 x 4 rib, *K 4, P 4* across the entire row. Work 8 total rows in the rib by knitting the knit stitches and purling the purl stitches in every row. Cut yarn and tie off. Weave in any ends from the main body left on this inside edge.

ruana15

PART 2 Instructions: Granny Square Trim

4.50 mm crochet hook
Assorted DK weight yarns
Gauge: 1 square = 6″

Next we’ll make TWO separate strips of 11 granny squares (about 6 inches in length each). You can definitely use scrap yarn here too, but I used a set of colors from Drops Lima yarn for a more uniform appearance.

ruana7

To begin the granny square, make a magic ring.

Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as first dc), 2 dc into the ring, ch 3. (3 dc into the ring, ch 3) 3 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc of the round. Cut yarn and tie off.

ruanagranny1ruanagranny2

Rnd 2: Join new yarn to any ch-3 space. Ch 3 (counts as first dc), 2 dc in the same sp, ch 3. 3 dc in the same space, ch 1. (3 dc in the next ch-3 space, ch 3, 3 dc in the same sp, ch 1) 3 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc of the round. Cut yarn and tie off.

ruanagranny3ruanagranny4ruanagranny5

Rnd 3: Join new yarn in any ch-3 space. Ch 3 (counts as first dc) 2 dc in the same sp, Ch 3, 3 dc in the same space, ch 1. 3 dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1. (3 dc in the next ch-3 space, ch 3, 3 dc in the same space, ch 1. 3 dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 3 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc of the round.. Cut yarn and tie off.

ruanagranny6ruanagranny7

Round 4: Join new yarn in any ch-3 space. Ch 3 (counts as first dc), 2 dc in the same space, ch 3. 3 dc in the same space, ch 1. (3 dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) twice. [3 dc in the next ch-3 space, ch 3, 3 dc in the same space, ch 1. (3 dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) twice] 3 times. Join with a slip stitch to the first dc of the round. Do not cut yarn.

ruanagranny8ruanagranny9

Rnd 5:

If this is your first square for the strip, work as normal. If this is not your first square, connect ONE of the sides to the previous square on the strip by beginning with any chain-3 corner and ending with the next, using this join-as-you-go methodΒ from Attic 24. If you prefer, you could also make all squares individually and seam them later πŸ™‚

Sl st in the next 2 dc and in the next ch st so your hook is positioned to begin the next round at the ch-3 corner. Ch 3 (counts as first dc)Β 2 dc in the same space, ch 3. 3 dc in the same space, ch 1. (3 dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 3 times. [3 dc in the next ch-3 space, ch 3, 3 dc in the same space, ch 1. (3 dc in the next ch-1 space, ch 1) 3 times] Repeat [bracketed] instructions 3 times total. Join with a sl st to the first dc of the round. Cut yarn and tie off.

ruanagranny10ruanagranny11ruanagranny12

Joining Seam

Once you have your 2 strips of grannies, check to see if they are roughly the length of the sides of the ruana by laying the strip against the edge of the trim. Ballpark is fine here, you just want to make sure neither piece is overly stretched or scrunched to match. You may end up needing one more or less granny, depending on your gauge and yarn choices.

Weave in all your ends and block if desired. Lay out the main body of the ruana and settle your granny strip up against the trim, the RS of the granny facing the same side as your ridge (where the fringe will be). Thread a tapestry needle with some spare DK weight yarn and use a simple whip stitch to attach the granny squares to the trim of the ruana all the way down across. Repeat on the other side.

ruana10

Clean up any ends remaining from your joining seam.

Fringe:

Using a 6″ piece of cardboard, book, or other object to wrap yarn around, cut a bunch of lengths of yarn for your fringe. Fold each length in half, then loop through the ridges made from picking up the stitches along the edge of the main body.

ruana8

Catch the leftover ends of knotted yarn in your fringe as you go, repeating across the edges on either side of the ruana. Once you have finished, cut the fringe down to just a little longer than the garter edge trim (you don’t want it covering your pretty grannies too much).

ruana9

Hunt down any stray ends that may need weaving in, then sink into the cozy rainbow bliss.

ruanacover6

 

ruanacover10

Kudos to model Daisey Denson for keeping that hat on her head like a champ despite the very GUSTY winds coming off the lake!

ruanacover1

-MF

Linked Double Crochet Tutorial

Years ago, I was crocheting a mysterious pineapple stitch market bag (I can’t seem to locate the pattern now) when I ran up against a stitch I hadn’t yet heard of: the linked treble crochet. After a few wonky stitches representing my first learning attempts, I had a band of prettily textured, smooth treble crochet stitchesΒ without holes in between them. This seemed like a tiny miracle to me, since as we know the taller stitches in this lovely craft of ours are pretty hole-y. Which is sometimes great. But sometimes not.

That pretty linked stitch stuck in my mind long after I finished off the project, so I came back for more – and found that you could link any tall stitch, which I consider one of the handiest little bits of hook wizardry to know!

ldctutecover.jpg

Today I want to share the Linked Double Crochet tutorial, which I think is a good introduction to linked stitches and ALSO happens to be a featured stitch in my upcoming new pattern πŸ˜‰Β  As you’ll see, linked double crochets are a neat, nice looking and easy way to eliminate gaps between stitches, which is great tool for garments that can’t be see-through or to reinforce areas of crochet for durability.

DaniSol4

Here is a shameless plug for the Plus Size Sol halter top pattern, in which I used linked double crochet (ldc), seen above! I also find ldc does a very nice job at creating borders for Tunisian crochet fabric like in my Shaman Coat pattern– the texture and density of the two stitch styles work well together.

ldcshaman

Neat, huh? So let’s do this!

Linked Double Crochet (ldc)

LDCtute9

Linked double crochet (ldc) uses the middle (horizontal) bar of the previous dc stitch to draw up a loop, instead of using a yarn over wrap as for a normal dc. This loop is then crocheted into the stitch as the yarn over would be, and the resulting stitches are linked by their horizontal bars.

Step 1:Β 

LDCtute1

Beginning with the first dc of your linked double crochet section, locate the “bar” of the stitch which runs diagonally across the middle, shown here highlighted in blue. Insert your hook, from top to bottom through this one strand.

If you are beginning a new row and not starting in the middle of a row of regular stitches, you can insert through the front half of the second chain of the turning chain, or make a regular dc to start.

LDCtute2

Step 2:

LDCtute3

Yarn over and draw up a loop through this strand. The loop just made stands in for the YO wrap that would normally begin a double crochet stitch.

Step 3:

LDCtute4

LDCtute5

Insert hook into the next stitch and draw up a loop – three loops on the hook.

Step 4:Β 

LDCtute6

Yarn over and draw through 2 loops.

LDCtute7

Yarn over and draw through two loops again to complete the stitch. The new stitch now has a middle bar (bright blue) that is linked to the middle bar of the previous stitch (faded blue).

To continue,Β keep inserting your hook into the middle bar of the previous ldc and drawing up a loop to replace the yarn over. The result is a line of sturdy but flexible stitching with a pleasing lined texture.

LDCtute9
Aww, it’s like they’re holding hands.

 

And about those linked treble crochets I mentioned at the beginning of the post – since they’ve got TWO middle bars, you can just draw up two loops – which stand in for the TWO yarn overs you would do for a regular treble. Pretty slick, eh? I think so.

-MF

 

Forest Girl Beret Free Crochet Pattern

As I mentioned in a recent post, I’ve been geeking out about Mori Kei (“forest style”), one of many fascinating Japanese street styles. I mean… combining forest themed accessories, layered skirts, and crochet/knitwear? Plus crazy socks?? Sign me up.

 

And of course, my proclivity for putting horns on things fits right in. So when I saw this adorable antlered beret on Pinterest, I was inspired to create my own version. Paired with a Mori-inspired outfit of course.

ForestGirl4

The hat pattern itself is a slight modification of the Sweetheart Beret, a free pattern I made two years ago. The antlers are new, done more simply than the bigger antlers I make for my Deer Hat pattern.Β  Hope you like this new little project, and be sure to share on Ravelry if you do!

beretcover1

Forest Girl Beret

ForestGirl1

Materials:
5.00 mm hook, 3.50 mm hook
1 skein Buttercream Mohair Metallic (#5 Bulky, 3.5 oz, 188 yds)
30-40 yds brown DK weight yarn for antlers (Worsted weight is fine, too)
Tapestry needle
Size 5 knitting DPNs (optional)
Gauge: 7 sts & 5 rows = 2” in hdc

Notes:

The Ch 2 at the beginning of each round DOES NOT COUNT as the first st of the round.

Instructions:

To begin, make a 6 row I-Cord using either the knit technique or the crochet I-cord technique (Planet June has an excellent tutorial on the crochet version)

On the sixth row, transfer all three loops (if knitting) onto your 5.00 mm crochet hook.

DSC_2667

Grab the loop closest to your hook end and draw it through the other two loops on the hook, leaving you with one loop on the hook.

DSC_2669

Rnd 1 : Ch 3. Join with a slip stitch to the first chain to form a ring. This gives you a ring attached to the base of the I-cord. With the I-cord at the back, Ch 2 and work 8 hdc into the ring, then join with a slip stitch to the first hdc, (remember this is NOT the beginning ch-2). You will have a circle of 8 hdc stitches with the I-cord off center from the beginning ring on the wrong side of your stitching, which is where it will stay until we center it later.

DSC_2671

I-cord with ch-3 ring made

DSC_2672

8 hdc into the ring

Rnd 2: Ch 2. 2 hdc into the same st. (2 hdc in the next st) 7 times. Join with a sl st. – 16 sts

Rnd 3: Ch 2, hdc into the same st. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next st, 2 hdc into the next st) 7 times. Join with a sl st – 24 sts.

Rnd 4: Ch 2, 1 hdc in the same st and 1 hdc in the next st. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc into ea of the next 2 sts, 2 hdc into the next st) 7 times. Join with a sl st – 32 sts

Rnd 5: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 2 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc into ea of the next 3 sts, 2 hdc into the next st.) 7 times. Join with a sl st – 40 sts.

Rnd 6: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 3 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 hdc into the next st.) 7 times. Join with a sl st – 48 sts.

Rnd 7: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in ea of the next 5 sts, 2 hdc into the next st.) 7 times. Join with a sl st – 56 sts.

beret2

At this point, my circular pattern is starting to form telltale points at the increases. To keep the work nice and rounded, the next round offsets the increases – although the total number of increases remains the same.

Rnd 8: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 2 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in ea of the next 6 sts, 2 hdc into the next st.) 7 times. Hdc in ea of the next 3 sts. Join with a sl st – 64 sts.

 

Rnd 9: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 3 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in ea of the next 7 sts, 2 hdc in the next st.) 7 times.Β  Hdc in ea of the next 3 sts. Join with a sl st – 72 sts.

DSC_2675

A few stitches before the end of Rnd 9

Rnd 10: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in ea of the next 8 sts, 2 hdc in the next st.) 7 times. Hdc in ea of the next 3 sts. Join with a sl st – 80 sts.

In the next round, we will offset the increases again.

Rnd 11: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 8 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in ea of the next 9 sts, 2 hdc in the next st.) 7 times. Join with a sl st – 88 sts.

Rnd 12: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 9 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in ea of the next 10 sts, 2 hdc in the next st.) 7 times. Join with a sl st – 96 sts.

Rnds 13-16: Ch 2, hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 95 sts. Join with a sl st – 96 sts.

Rnd 17: Ch 2, hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 9 sts. Hdc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 hdc in ea of the next 10 sts, hdc2tog over the next 2 sts.) – 88 sts.

Rnd 18-20: Ch 2, 1 hdc in the same st. Hdc in ea of the next 87 sts. – 88 sts

Rnd 21: Ch 2, 1 hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 3 sts. Hdc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 hdc in ea of the next 3 sts, hdc2tog over the next 2 sts. 1 hdc in ea of the next 4 sts, hdc2tog over the next 2 sts) 7 times. 1 hdc in ea of the next 3 sts, hdc2tog over the next 2 sts. Join with a sl st. – 72 sts.

Rnd 22: Ch 2, 1 hdc in the same st and in ea of the next 6 sts. Hdc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 hdc in ea of the next 7 sts, hdc2tog over the next 2 sts) around – 64 sts

The next round begins with a turn so that we are working with the WS facing. The rest of the hat will be worked from this side.

Rnd 23: Ch 1, turn. Sc in the same st and in ea of the next 71 sts. Join with a sl st – 72 sts.

Rnds 24 – 25: Ch 1, sc in the same st and in ea of the next 71 sts. Join with a sl st – 72 sts.

Rnd 26: Sl st loosely in the next st and in ea of the remaining 71 sts. Try on the hat to test for size. If the slip stitching makes your brim too tight, skip this round. Cut yarn and tie off.

DSC_2676

This hat uses the wrong side of the piece as the outside surface, so make sure that the wrong side is facing out before weaving in all your ends!

DSC_2677

Thread your yarn needle with the yarn end from the i-cord.

beret1

Slip the needle end down through the i-cord and through the opposite side of the beginning ring to center the cord over the middle of the beginning ring. Straighten out your yarn tension so that the i-cord can stretch out fully and look natural. Weave in the rest of the yarn end, and all other yarn ends.

DSC_2688

Antlers:

beret4

Using 3.50 hook and DK weight yarn

Make 2 of each tine. Worked continuously in the round. Use a stitch marker to keep track of rounds. Gauge is amigurumi-style, aka as tight as possible πŸ˜‰

Main Tine:

Rnd 1: Make Magic Ring. 6 sc into the ring. Pull the ring closed tightly.

Rnd 2: 1 sc in ea sc around. – 6 sts

Rnd 3: *1 sc in the next sc, 2 sc in the next sc. Rpt from * around. – 9 sts

Rnds 4-13: 1 sc in ea st around. – 9 sts

Rnd 14: *1 sc in ea of the next 2 sc, 2 sc in the next sc. Rpt fromΒ  * around. – 12 sts

Sl st in the next 2-3 sts, cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

2nd Tine

Rnd 1: Make Magic Ring. 6 sc into the ring. Pull the ring closed tightly.

Rnd 2: 1 sc in ea sc around. – 6 sts

Rnd 3: *1 sc in the next sc, 2 sc in the next sc. Rpt from * around. – 9 sts

Rnds 4-8: 1 sc in ea st around. – 9 sts

Sl st in the next 2-3 sts. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Assembly:

Thread the long tail of the 2nd tine onto a tapestry needle and sew around the base onto the main tine. Weave in the end. Rpt for other antler.

Thread the long tail of the main tine onto a tapestry needle and position your antlers on the beret. I tried to place mine roughly equally spaced around the 6th-7th round of the beret. I liked this for a subtle look, where the antlers can mostly be seen from the back. But, it would be fun to position them further forward too!

If your stitching isn’t tight enough to keep the antlers stiff on their own, you can stuff a tiny bit of fiberfill in the base of the main tine to help stabilize things.

beret5

Sew around the base of the antler, attaching it to the beret. Weave in any remaining ends.

beret6

ForestGirl3

Quick AND cute, I’ll definitely be making a few more of these for springtime! I also unearthed the toadstool beret I had from the making of the originalΒ  tam pattern and got some new photos. I used a tapestry needle threaded with fluffy white bulky weight yarn to add the characteristic speckles by embroidering french knots.

Ama1

I particularly enjoy the background view of my freaky forest friends staring me down πŸ˜€

-MF

beretcover2

Basic Armwarmers Tutorial

Warmers1

Armwarmers are an awesome crochet project. Quick, fun, and not finicky – these babies have been a go-to for me whenever I have a spare skein of soft yarn that needs a purpose. This pattern/tutorial/guide is customizeable, with enough structure to use as a straightforward pattern for beginners, or for more experienced crocheters to use as a base for inspiration.

Warmers2

This tutorial features a guide for figuring gauge & sizing, base pattern for two different gauge sizes, and some ideas for creative extras. My favorite features of the gloves themselves are the continuous round construction that eliminates the join seam and the unique thumb opening, which creates a more contoured fit at the base of the thumb.

So without further introduction…

Basic Armwarmers Tutorial

Materials:
300-400 yds #4 or #5 weight yarn
5.00 mm hook
Scissors, tapestry needle
2 Stitch Markers

Gauge:
For bulky yarns, 3 sts & 2 rows = 1″ in hdc
For worsted yarns, 7 sts & 5 rows = 2″ in hdc

Figuring Gauge:

ArmwarmersGauge1

For this project you’ll need to make a gauge swatch. This is just a square of fabric worked, for this project, in rows of half double crochet. Generally more stitches per square will give you a better reading of your gauge, but I have cheated a bit here and made relatively small swatches. The worsted weight swatches (purple, top left and rainbow, bottom) both measure 7 sts & 5 rows = 2″.

You can find out your gauge by creating a swatch 10-20 stitches in length, with enough rows to make a fat rectangle or a square. Then, take a measuring device and measure across a row of stitches in the middle of the swatch.

ArmwarmersGauge2

As you can see, for this gauge measuring to ONE inch means I’d have a fraction of a stitch included in my gauge (since one inch covers about 3 and a half stitches). Since that makes for messy math, measure for 2″ instead, which gives 7 sts = 2″.

Next, measure how many rows will equal your 2″ in height.

ArmwarmersGauge3

So for this yarn, my gauge is 7 sts and 5 rows = 2″.Β  My bulky weight yarn gauge (the yellow) is more even, with 3 sts and 2 rows equalling an inch. You can use your gauge to create a custom sized pair of armwarmers, or you can change hooks or yarn weights to match one of the two gauges listed here and use the pre-written patterns for each gauge.

Sizing:

To figure your own custom size, take a tape measure and get the circumference of your hand measured across the base of your thumb with your hand relaxed (not spread or closed tightly). For me, this is about 8-9″. This is how wide the armwarmer will be. This measurement will also be enough to get the warmer snug on my mid-forearm, which also measures about 8-9″.

ArmwarmersGauge4

Since I like my armwarmers snug, we’ll shoot for an 8″ circumference (don’t forget they will stretch some also). In the bulky yarn gauge, 3 stitches = 1″ in width, so 8 (inches) x 3 (sts) = 24 sts. Our armwarmer pattern for bulky yarn will use a base of 24 sts.

In worsted weight gauge, I had 7 sts = 2″, so since 2″ goes into 8″ 4 times, I use the formula 7 (sts) x 4 (sets of 2 inches) = 28 sts. Our armwarmer pattern for worsted weight will use a base of 28 sts.

The photos for the tutorial appear for the worsted weight pattern, with the bulky weight pattern instructions appearing separately below πŸ™‚ But you can use the photo reference for both!

Basic Armwarmers: Worsted Weight

Notes: Worked continuously in the round. Place marker in the first stitch of every round.

Rnd 1: Ch 28. Join in a ring by working a sc into the first st of the chain.

Armtute1

Rnd 2: Hdc in the next st. Place marker in this first stitch. Hdc in ea of the next 27 sts.

Armtute3

Rnds 3 – 21: Hdc in ea hdc around.

Armtute5

Rnd 22: Hdc in the first st. Place a 2nd marker in the stitch half way around the row from the first stitch of the round (the 14th st). This is where you will create the hole for the thumb over the next 2 rounds. Hdc in ea of the next 12 sts. 3 dc in the marked stitch. Move the 2nd marker to the 2nd dc in this st. Hdc in ea of the next 14 sts.

Armtute6

Armtute7

Armtute8

Rnd 23: Hdc in ea of the next 13 sts. Dc in the next st. Sk next 3 sts, dc in the next st. Hdc in ea st around.

Armtute9

Armtute10

Armtute11

Ta-Da! Thumbhole. NOW, you can add a few more rounds of hdc, but since I will be adding post stitch ribbing to the end, I am not going to do that. Whenever you have reached the length you like (saving room for embellishment if you want to), end your final round and then use:

1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 1 sl st in ea of the next 2 sts.Β  Cut yarn and tie off.

Armtute12

This accomplishes a height change so your edge will be even. To add trim like contrasting sc, scallops, or post stitch rib, rejoin your yarn and work in regular, non-continuous rounds.

Armtute13

Post Stitch Rnd 1: Join yarn in any stitch, ch 2 (does not count as first st). Hdc in ea st around. Join with a sl st in the first hdc of the round.
Post Stitch Rnd 2: Ch 2 (does not count), Fphdc in the same st. Bphdc in the next st. *Fphdc in the next st, bphdc in the next st. Rpt from * around. Join with a sl st in the first st of the round.

Rpt Rnd 2 again, or until you have the length you want. Cut yarn and tie off.

For more info on how to work post stitches, see my tutorial here! For the purple armwarmers below, I added a round of scallops and some contrasting embroidery. Okay, my embroidery needs a little work πŸ˜›

Armwarmers1

Basic Armwarmers: Bulky Weight

Notes: Worked continuously in the round. Place marker in the first stitch of every round.

Rnd 1: Ch 24. Join in a ring by working a sc into the first st of the chain.

Rnd 2: Hdc in the next st. Place marker in the first st. Hdc in ea of the next 23 sts.

Rnds 3-16: Hdc in ea hdc around.

Rnd 17: Place a 2nd st marker in the 12th stitch of the round. Hdc in ea stitch until you reach the marker, then 3 dc in the marked stitch. Transfer 2nd marker to the 2nd dc of this stitch. Hdc in the next 12 sts.

Rnd 18: Hdc in ea of the next 10 sts. Dc in the next st. Sk next 3 sts. Dc in the next st. Hdc in ea of the next 12 sts.

Rnds 19 – 21 (or until you have the length you want): Hdc in ea st around.

To end, finish your last round then 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 1 sl st in ea of the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Armwarmers5Armwarmers6

I added some spiffy autumn trees to the mustard yellow gloves!

I hope this little tutorial has inspired you to use up some orphan skeins (or go out and buy new ones… hey, I ain’t gonna judge).

-MF

warmerscollage2