Pattern Gallery: Magical Coat Collection

One of my secret disappointments in life is knowing that no matter how fast I work, I’ll never make all the projects I want to. This is mostly because I want to make practically everything! There are so many talented designers coming up with beautiful things and it’s all accessible via the deep magic of the web.

Most of my time is spent maintaining Morale Fiber, crocheting, answering e-mails, designing – and so I don’t get to take much time out to make other people’s patterns, but I keep a hearty collection of ideas and other patterns via Ravelry, Etsy, and Pinterest! So when the members of the Magic Fantastic Crochet Atelier frequently asked after an Elf Coat style sweater that wasn’t in Tunisian crochet, I was ready to do another pattern gallery for easy searching. It’s my great pleasure to unveil the Magical Coat Collection today ❀

Below you’ll find all the magical style crochet coat patterns (most of them AREN’T TUNISIAN) I’ve loved over the years, along with a bit of information on each and links to the pages where they can be purchased – Enjoy ❀

Magical Coat Collection

  1. Serged Dream Coat by Stephanie Pokorny of Crochetverse:
    This amazing sweater coat shares the same inspiration source as my Elf Coat, the wonderful recycled sweater work of Katwise! This gorgeous coat is made in easy half double crochet stitches and features an Easy Fit size and pattern changes for up to 3X size, and Stephanie’s gallery of examples is (as usual) incredibly colorful, unique and inspiring. Just try to look at this coat without dreaming up your own amazing color scheme to try – bet you can’t!

2. Titania Pixie Jacket by Efilly Designs
I absolutely adore this fittingly named Pixie Jacket, which features regular crochet stitches (not Tunisian) and creates a tailored bodice and an flattering cinched waist. The adorable short skirt really tops off this enchanting piece! Sizes come in Small – XLarge ❀

3. Glenda’s Hooded Cardigan by Glenda Bohard-Avila
This one has been around for a while, long enough for me to have actually managed to make it! This lovely one-size crochet pattern features simple, clear instructions and notes for how to modify the garment to create different sizes. Worked in regular double crochet. I loved making this in a sleeveless rainbow version and the buyer was thrilled with the result πŸ™‚ Great for beginners and those who want a magical look without all the complicated seams.

4. Boreal Coat by Sylvie Damie
This coat is the perfect option for a magical coat with lots of impact but few seams or piecing together! Worked in regular double crochet, this is a top-down one piece crochet coat aptly named for it’s lovely waves of color in the original example. I’ve admired this one for years! Available in sizes XS-XL.

5. Pixie Coat Tutorial by Earth Tricks
A long-time favorite designer of mine, Earth Tricks uses measurement-based tutorial writing to explain how to create your own magical, unique pixie coat in regular double crochet! Rather than using set stitch counts, this is a more free-style explanation of how to work this design based on gauge and measurements, so it’s fantastic for more seasoned crocheters who want something flexible and inspiring to create! I just love all her examples on the Ravelry page ❀ ❀

6. Open Spaces Coat by Sylvie Damie
Another from this prolific designer! I couldn’t resist the chain length spaces put in this coat to give it a lovely magic profile and lots of swing – all while using super bulky yarn making it very quick to crochet! Worked in regular double crochet, and available in sizes XS-XL.

7. Mountain Magic Cardigan by ColoradoShire
This fancy fantastical longline cardigan uses regular single and double crochet, plus edging the garment in beautiful crocodile stitch scales. Croc stitch is a particular favorite of mine so I immediately added this design to my list – great for intermediate crocheters looking for something simple, fun, and different. Sizes Small – XL and worked in easy to get #4 weight yarn.

8. Priestess Coat by Morale Fiber
My newest Tunisian Coat design features Tunisian simple stitch (the easiest one to learn!) and an overall construction that’s just a *bit* less fussy than my Elf Coat. This robe-style coat is worked in Lion Brand Shawl in a Ball, a lightweight #4 yarn available in dreamy colors, with optional faux fur trim and a rounded-back hood for those that don’t care for the pointed hoods. This coat is a great option if you want to learn Tunisian but find the Elf Coat pattern too daunting to start with – and it’s available in sizes XS- 2XL!

9. Flower of Life Oversize Hooded Jacket by Jen Xerri (Starlily Creations)
Squee! You know I just HAD to feature a Starlily creation in this collection, as she’s one of the fastest growing crochet influencers out there and just an incredibly sweet person to boot. This jacket pattern is another that I actually own in my pattern collection – I haven’t worked it fully yet but I’ve looked through it as a reference and it’s very well written and clear with lovely tutorial photos! The Flower of Life design is another great pattern worked with regular non-tunisian stitches (it’s easier than it looks!) and the central back motif is surrounded by rounds of interesting but not too complex stitch patterns! Sizing is flexible, garment is oversized or undersized to create a jacket or a vest ❀

10. Elf Coat by Morale Fiber (also available for free right here on this blog)
Ok, both of my contributions to this list have been Tunisian crochet (the rest aren’t though!!) when I created this list specifically for those inquiring about non-tunisian magical coat patterns BUT! I did need to include the original design of mine that inspired this post, and here’s my plea: If you are daunted by learning Tunisian Crochet, check out my YouTube Playlist containing all the videos of the techniques needed to learn to make this Elf Coat. I know it’s a lot different than regular crochet, but Tunisian is a great skill to add and in my opinion, it’s a super unique and amazing stitch style that absolutely can’t be mimicked either in regular crochet or even in knitting (which it can look so very much like that it fools actual knitters). I know you can to buy a special hook and everything, but perhaps you’d like to just try it out using my clever wine cork stopper rig? That way, you can try it without buying any special equipment! This pattern currently comes in sizes Small, Medium, and Large – but I will be working on a Plus Sizes expansion as soon as I can πŸ™‚

I hope you found this list of designs both helpful and inspiring, and please consider purchasing some of these designs to support the people who created them so they can keep making awesome stuff. Happy Magicking!

Pictured above: The Shaman Coat, which is also Tunisian and I sorta snuck this one in under the radar πŸ˜‰

-MF

Winter Poncho Pattern

True to form, I’ve circled back around to reworking an older design at almost the exact anniversary of it’s original release. Five years ago in January I released the Boho Fringe Poncho as my tenth paid pattern. Today, I’d like to introduce this same design as it’s been reformatted, tweaked for improvements, and released FOR FREE here on the blog!

You can still get the updated crochet pattern as a PDF in my Ravelry and Etsy stores, or keep scrolling for the free pattern (which includes everything in the PDF)

I really enjoy revisiting my patterns to make sure that they are the best that they can be, and this is kind of a constant task as I’m always trying to grow and improve my skills as a pattern designer. Sometimes I just have more to offer in terms of technical assistance – additional tutorial photos were a MUST with this piece – and sometimes I believe that the form & content of the design makes it a good candidate to be re-released for free (the Rhiannon Cowl is another great little project of mine that started as a paid PDF and then debuted on the blog as a free version!)

In this case, I considered just about every aspect of the pattern needed attention πŸ˜‰ Including the name! While I liked “Boho Fringe” it just didn’t really fit the nature of the poncho. This piece is a Big Booty Judy, made with thick warm woolen yarns, post stitches, and a cozy fit that hugs your shoulders for extra warmth. Realizing that its thicc qualities made it a perfect item to have in the coldest months I decided to rename it – the Winter Poncho!

This is a wonderful project for using up bulky or super bulky scraps (see the notes for more about yarn substitution), it uses large hook sizes so that the project works up quickly, and it’s waaaaaaarm πŸ™‚

Winter Poncho Crochet Pattern

Materials

7 skeins Bernat Roving (#5 weight, 100 g / 120 yds, 80% Acrylic, 20% Wool) – all solid-colored examples are made with this recommended yarn, the multi-colored examples are made with a mix of bulky and super bulky weight scrap yarns!
9.00 mm hook, 11.5 mm hook
Tapestry Needle
Scissors

Techniques Used

Chain (ch), Double Chain (dch), Double Crochet (dc), Slip Stitch (sl st), Front Post Double Crochet (fpdc), Back Post Double Crochet (bpdc) (click the links for tutorials!)

Measurements (approximate): 40” circumference at the top, 54” circumference at the bottom, 18”long (not including fringe)

Gauge:

4 sts & 3 rows = 2” in alternating fpdc/bpdc for 9.00 mm hook, 3 sts & 3 rows = 2” in alternating fpdc/bpdc for 11.5 mm hook.

Notes:

The chain-2 at the beginning of every round does not count as the first stitch of the round. When joining rounds with the slip stitch, skip the ch-2 entirely and join into the first fpdc of the round.

I have recommended Bernat Roving for this project, which is a #5 weight yarn but it gauges somewhere between a bulky yarn and a super bulky yarn. Some of my Winter Ponchos have mixed #5 & #6 weight yarns, which works pretty well –  but be sure to follow gauge if you substitute yarns!

The Winter Poncho is closed at the top with a drawstring, but the rest of the shape is dictated by hook size and follows the same number of stitches through every round. If you need a wider poncho, evenly place an even number of increases at Round 10 in order to size up.

Two types of fringing is offered in this pattern, the Double Chain Fringe of the original design, and the regular fringe which I have been favoring lately – both types are included in the instructions.

Poncho (Main Body)

Starting with the 9 mm hook, dch 80. Join with a slip stitch to form a ring, making sure not to twist.

Rnd 1: Ch 2, dc in the same stitch as join. (1 dc in the next st) 79 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc of the round. – 80 sts

Rnd 2: Ch 2, fpdc in the first dc of the last round, bpdc in the next dc. (1 fpdc in the next st, 1 bpdc in the next st) 39 times. Join with a sl st in the first fpdc of the round – 80 sts

Rnds 3: Ch 2, fpdc in the first fpdc of the last round, bpdc in the next bpdc. (1 fpdc in the next st, 1 bpdc in the next st) 39 times. Join with a sl st in the first fpdc of the round.

Rnds 4 – 10: Rpt Rnd 3.

Switch to the 11.5 mm hook, then continue in pattern for rounds 11-27.

Rnds 11 – 27: Rpt Rnd 3.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Double Chain Drawstring

Double chain a length of 60” (about 120 DCh stitches) with your main yarn. Cut yarn and tie off. Weave this cord through the first row of post stitches at the top of the poncho, going underneath each FPDC and over each BPDC. Finish the ends with either a stranded fringe, tassel, pompom, or whatever you like!

To work the double chain, see my tutorial post here.

Double Chain Fringe

The double chain fringe offers a bolder fringed look than the regular stranded yarn fringe, and copies the original inspiration piece for this design. For a humbler decoration, see the instructions for traditional fringe.

Using the 9.00 mm hook, dch 25- 45 sts or about  10 – 20” of unstretched double chain cord, depending on how long you want your chain fringe. Cut yarn and tie off. Make 19 more double chain cords of about the same length.

When you have twenty cords total, weave in all the yarn ends if you want a very neat fringe. Leave the yarn tails hanging down a bit for a more organic fringe.

If you survived the tedium of end-weaving, the next step is to double up the cords so that ends are together and a loop forms in the middle. Push that loop through the top of a fpdc stitch (NOT through the post) on Rnd 27 (the larger end of the piece).

Insert the ends of the double chain cord through the loop and draw them to tighten.

Repeat with the 19 other fringe cords, placing them every 2nd fpdc stitch so that there is 1 non-fringed fpdc between every fringed one. 

Weave in all ends.

Stranded Fringe

For a traditional fringe, get a book or length of cardboard 6” wide. Using your yarn of choice, wrap your yarn around the width 80 times, then cut one side to leave a bundle of 12” strands.

Double your strand over and use the loop at the end to thread the two loose ends through each crochet stitch around the border of the poncho.

Once you’ve put the finishing touches on your Winter Poncho, make sure all your ends are woven in before scurrying out into the cold!

I think the saying goes “Make new patterns but keep the old; one is silver, the other is gold!” Or something like that anyway πŸ˜‰

-MF