Forest Guide Hat

I debated with myself for a long time about what to call this fantastical creature hat. In the end, I chose “Forest Guide” because “Three Eyed Antlered Inter-dimensional Fox Spirit Guide” seemed too long. Whatever you call it, this new design is available for FREE here in this blog post or as a downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store. Read on for more details!

Let’s rewind a minute to talk about the inspiration for this design- this hat was conceived in several different parts, the first part being that I see faces in random blobs (a common human tendency called “pareidolia” and side effect of having any kind of imagination) and I saw a three-eyed antlered fox one day while staring sleepily at the tapestry on my bedroom wall.

“Say” I said to myself, “that would make a weird hat.” You see, I had recently completed a custom commissioned piece for a complex hat with tons of details based on my Krampus Hat pattern. It was an experience that gave me lots of new ideas.

The free pattern for the Krampus Hat itself has produced so many amazing, creative interpretations that I wanted to do another pattern that was similarly Out There. And I wanted to keep exploring the 3-D, sculptural crochet techniques that I have already been dabbling in for a while (like with the Deer Hat and the Sylphie Hat).

Plus, CREATURES. I like ’em. Rawr.

So I stared at my tapestry a bit more, made some sketches, and worked out a vague plan. I was aiming to create something mystical, and complex, and cute but creepy in a Ghibli-esque sort of way. An elusive forest spirit, a shapechanger, a keeper of the paths.

One of the best parts about designing this was all the little shapes that make up the details of the hat – there are 23 individual amigurumi components to this hat. That’s a lot! But with so many options, the piece can be customized to your heart’s content OR the details can be used individually for different projects (Make just the fox hat, or those antlers might make an awesome headpiece on their own, or the cute crescent moon could adorn something…)

I hope you enjoy this FREE crochet pattern for the Forest Guide hat, and have as much fun creating it as I did. This pattern is available with all the same features here as a downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Store!

100% of the proceeds from the first five days of PDF sales for this pattern was donated to WIRES, an Australian wildlife rescue nonprofit, to help aid the animals fleeing burned habitat ❤ Thank you everyone who participated in the fundraiser!

This elaborate crochet fantasy hat imagines the spirit of the forest as an elusive shapechanger, guide, and keeper of the paths. In the form of a three-eyed, antlered fox, it appears to travelers trying to find their way. Will it offer help or guide you deeper into wilderness?

A customizable soft-sculpture costume head piece, this is one crochet project that you will not be able to keep hidden in the trees! The written pattern for the main hat includes detailed instructions for all 23 amigurumi components, plus photo AND video tutorials for making all the pieces and assembling.

Written in U.S terminology

Materials & Notes

4.50 mm hook
3.75 mm hook

2 skeins Lion Brand Heartland Yosemite (#4 Worsted Weight, 251 yds / 5 oz, 100% acrylic) (Main Color – Red)
1 skein Lion Brand Heartland Great Sand Dunes (Accent Color – Beige)
1 skein Lion Brand Heartland Bryce Canyon (Accent Color – Gold)
>100 yds #4 weight accent color orange
>100 yds #4 weight accent color black
>50 yds #4 weight accent color white

> 50 yds accent fur yarn (any white or cream colored)
> 50 yds accent fur yarn (any orange) – optional

Scissors
Tapestry Needle
Polyester Fiberfill & stuffing stick
12” chenille craft pipe cleaners, 6 mm (2)
Measuring tape
Styrofoam Head form
Locking stitch markers

Gauge:

4 sts & 8 rows = 1”, or 2” in diameter after Rnd 7 in main pattern

Finished Measurements:
Main Hat: 24” circumference around the inside, 13-14” from bottom of earflap to crown

Stitches and Abbreviations:


magic ring (MR)
single crochet (sc)
slip stitch (sl st)
front loop only (FLO)
chain stitch (ch)
back loop only (BLO)
single crochet decrease (sc dec)
half-double crochet (hdc)
double crochet (dc)
treble crochet (tr)
5-wrap bullion (5-bull)- Wrap yarn around hook 5 times. Insert hook into next st, draw up a loop. Draw the same loop through each of the 5 wraps on the hook. YO and draw through last loop on the hook. (Double crochet may be substituted for this stitch)
6-wrap bullion (6-bull) – Wrap yarn around hook 6 times. Insert hook into next st. draw up a loop. Draw the same loop through each of the 6 wraps on the hook. YO and draw through last loop on the hook. (Treble crochet may be substituted for this stitch)
back post double crochet (BPDC) – double crochet worked by inserting the hook around the post of the stitch below, entering and emerging from the back (wrong side) of the work . For more help with post stitches, see my tutorial here: Post Stitch Ribbing tutorial
back post half double crochet (BPHDC) – half double crochet worked by inserting the hook around the post of the stitch below, entering and emerging from the back (wrong side) of the work.
front post double crochet (FPDC) – double crochet worked by inserting the hook around the post of the stitch below, entering and emerging from the front (right side) of the work.
front post half-double crochet (FPHDC) –  half double crochet worked by inserting the hook around the post of the stitch below, entering and emerging from the front (right side) of the work.
right side (RS)
wrong side (WS)
hook (hk)
stitch/es (st/sts)

Notes:

The circular pattern alternates rounds worked in the front and back loops of the previous round. I highly recommend using a locking marker on the back loop of the first stitch of each sc round (odd numbered rounds) so you know for sure where to start and finish – with all of those loops it can get confusing and the markers always save the day.

Working a large number of chain loops will make the hat base curl and may be hard to work with – this is normal. For help on how to handle working the main hat, please see my demo video on my Youtube channel linked below.

Video Tutorials: Video tutorials, including demos and full-length patterns for this design, can be found on my Youtube Channel here. They’re also embedded in the instructions on the blog below!

Main Hat Instructions

To Begin, make magic ring with Main Color and a 4.50 mm hook.

Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring, join round with a sl st in the front loop of the first stitch. Pull the ring closed tightly. – 6 sts

Rnd 2: Working in the FLO of Rnd 1 (Ch 9, *sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt  5 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 6 ch loops

Rnd 3: 2 sc into each of the back loops only (BLO)  of the sc stitches from Rnd 1.  Join with a sl st in the FLO. – 12 sts

Rnd 4: Working in the FLO of Rnd 3, (Ch 9. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt  11 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join – 12 ch loops

Rnd 5: In BLO of Rnd 3, (1 sc in next st, 2 sc in the next st. ) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 18 sts

Rnd 6: Working in the FLO of Rnd 5, (Ch 9. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt  17 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 18 ch loops

Rnd 7: In BLO of Rnd 5, (1 sc in each of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round – 24 sts

Rnd 8: Working in the FLO of Rnd 7, (Ch 9. *sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 23 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 24 ch loops

Rnd 9: In BLO of Rnd 7, (1 sc in each of the next 3 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 30 sts

Rnd 10:  Working in FLO of Rnd 9, (Ch 9. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 29 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 30 ch loops

Rnd 11: In BLO of Rnd 9, (1 sc in each of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 36 sts

Rnd 12: Working in FLO of Rnd 11, sc in the same stitch as sl st join. (Ch 9. *Sc in the next stitch.)  Rpt  35 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 36 ch loops

Rnd 13: In BLO of Rnd 11, (1 sc in each of the next 5 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 42 sts

Rnd 14: Working in FLO of Rnd 13,  (Ch 9. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 41 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 42 ch loops

Rnd 15: In BLO of Rnd 13, (1 sc in each of the next 6 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 48 sts

Rnd 16: Working in FLO of Rnd 15, (Ch 10. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 47 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 48 ch loops

Rnd 17: In BLO of Rnd 15, (1 sc in each of the next 7 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 54 sts

Rnd 18: Working in FLO of Rnd 17, (Ch 10.  *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 53 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 54 ch loops

Rnd 19: In BLO of Rnd 17, 1 sc in each sc around. Join with a sl st in the FL of first st in the rnd. – 54 sts

Rnd 20: Working in FLO of Rnd 19, (Ch 11. *Sl st in the next st.) Rpt 53 more times, ending last rpt at *. Do not join. – 54 ch lps

Rnd 21: In BLO of Rnd 19, (1 sc in each of the next 8 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 60 sts

Rnd 22: Working in FLO of Rnd 21, (Ch 11. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 59 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 60 ch loops

Rnd 23: In BLO of Rnd 21, sc in each stitch around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 60 sts

Rnd 24: Working in FLO of Rnd 23, (Ch 11. *Sl st in the next stitch.) Rpt 59 more times, ending last rpt at *. Do not join. – 60 ch loops

Rnd 25: Working in BLO of Rnd 23, (1 sc in ea of the next 9 sts, 2 sc in the next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FL of the first st of the rnd. – 66 sts

Rnd 26: Working in the FLO of Rnd 25, (Ch 11. *Sl st in the next stitch.) Rpt 65 more times, ending last rpt at *. Do not join. – 66 ch loops

Rnd 27: In BL of previous rnd, sc in each stitch around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 66 sts

Rnd 28: Working in FLO of previous rnd, (Ch 12. *Sl st in the next stitch.) Rpt 65 more times, ending last rpt at *. Do not join. – 66 ch loops

Rnds 29-42: Rpt Rnds 27-28 7 more times.

Rnd 43: In BL of previous rnd, sc in each stitch around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 66 sts

Rnd 44: Working in FLO of previous rnd, (Ch 13. *Sl st in the next st.) Rpt 65 more times, ending alst rpt at *. Do not join.

Rnds 45 – 52: Rpt Rnds 43-44 4 more times. Sl st in the next st.  Do not tie off – leave yarn attached to begin working earflaps.

Earflaps (Make 2)

Get four locking stitch markers. Place one in the BL of the first stitch of the previous round. Place second marker 9 stitches from the first (counting in same direction as you would work the round). Including stitches with markers, this makes a 10-stitch section. Starting with the first stitch after the 2nd marker, count 19 stitches in the same direction you would work the round. Place the third marker in the back loop of the 19 stitch. Place 4th marker 9 stitches from the third.

This leaves you with two marked off sections of 10 stitches (where you will work the earflaps) with an 18-stitch gap on one side (the back of the hat) and a 28-stitch gap on the other side (the front of the hat).  You can try on the hat now to see where those sections fall and adjust if necessary – as long as you have two sections of 10 stitches you can place them where you like.

Earflaps are worked in rows, turning after each row. Every row is worked in the back loop only.

Row 1: RS facing, join with a sc to the marked st at the beginning of one marked off 10-st section. 1 sc into the BLO of ea of next 9 sts. Ch 13, turn.

Row 2: Working in the BLO, sl st in next st. (Ch 13, * sl st in the next st) 9 more times, ending last rpt at *. Turn – 10 ch loops

Row 3: In the BLO, sc in ea of the next 10 sts. Ch 13, turn.

Row 4: Rpt Row 2.

Row 5: Rpt Row 3.

Row 6: Rpt Row 2.

Row 7: To begin this row, work a sc decrease over the BL of the first 2 stitches. Sc in ea of the next 6 sts. Work a sc decrease over the next 2 stitches. Ch 13, turn. – 8 sts.

Row 8: Sl st in the next st. (Ch 13, * sl st in the next st) 7 times, ending last rpt at *. Ch 13, turn. –  8 ch loops.

Row 9: Sc in ea of the next 8 sts. Ch 13, turn. – 8 sts

Row 10: Rpt Row 8.

Row 11: To begin this row, work a sc decrease over the BL of the first 2 sts. Sc in ea of the next 4 sts. Work a sc decrease over the next 2 sts. Ch 13, turn. – 6 sts

Row 12: Sl st in the next st. (Ch 13, *sl st in the next st) 5 times, ending last rpt at *. Turn. – 6 ch loops

Row 13: Work a sc decrease over the next 2 sts. Sc in ea of next 2 sts. 1 sc dec over the next 2 sts. Ch 13, turn. – 4 sts

Row 14: Sl st in the next st. (Ch 13, *sl st in the same st) 3 times, ending last rpt at *. Turn. – 4 ch loops

Row 15: (Work a sc dec over the next 2 sts) twice. If this is your first earflap, cut yarn and tie off. If this is your second earflap, do not cut or tie off.

Brim:

The brim works three rows of sc in each stitch around the edge of the hat, including the earflaps. Continue using yarn still attached from the 2nd earflap.

Row 1: Work 1 sc in the side of ea row down the earflap toward the main part of the hat. Continue to work 1 sc in the back loops of the stitches and 1 sc in between ea loop on the sides of the earflaps all the way around the hat.

Row 2: Sc in ea sc.

Row 3: Sc in ea sc.

Details Instructions

Fox Ears (Make 2):

Worked in the round, placing marker in the first stitch of every round to keep track.

With 4.50 hook and #4 black yarn, make magic ring.

Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring. Pull the ring closed tightly. – 6 sts

Rnd 2: *1 sc in the next st, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 9 sts

Rnd 3: *1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 12 sts

Rnd 4: *1 sc in ea of the next 3 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 15 sts

Rnd 5: *1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 18 sts

Rnd 6: *1 sc in ea of the next 5 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 21 sts

Rnd 7: *1 sc in ea of the next 6 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 24 sts

Rnd 8: *1 sc in ea of the next 7 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 27 sts

Rnd 9: *1 sc in ea of the next 8 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 30 sts

Rnd 10: *1 sc in ea of the next 9 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 33 sts

Rnd 11: *1 sc in ea of the next 10 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 36 sts

Rnd 12: *1 sc in ea of the next 11 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 39 sts

Rnd 13: *1 sc in ea of the next 12 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. -42 sts

Rnd 14: *1 sc in ea of the next 13 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 45 sts

Rnds 15 – 19: 1 sc in ea st around. – 45 sts.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Ear Trim:

The ear is flattened to later fit on the hat – flatten the ear and fold it inward to get an idea.  Video demo available below.

Row 1: To trim the ear, use the 4.50 mm hook to attach the fur accent yarn a few stitches inward from the edge, starting at the bottom. Slip stitch on the surface of the piece, staying a few stitches inward from the edge, toward the tip of the ear.

Once a few stitches from the top, turn and slip stitch back down the other side in the same manner.

Row 2: Ch 1, turn and slip stitch in ea of the slip stitches just made in the first Row.

Row 3 (Optional): I did a third line of slip stitching inward from the first, using a different fur yarn, to add more texture. Work across the bottom of the ear for the 3rd row.

TIP: Use a pet brush or wig brush to tease out the hair on the fur yarn to make the texture softer!

Antlers:

Main Tine (Make 2):

Worked continuously in the round, place marker in the first stitch of every round to keep track. Video tutorial available below.


With 3.75 hook and #4 accent color beige, make magic ring.

Rnd 1: 3 sc into the ring. Pull the ring closed tightly. – 3 sts

Rnd 2: 1 sc in the next st, 2 sc in the next st, 1 sc in the next st. – 4 sts

Rnd 3: 1 sc in ea st. – 4 sts

Rnd 4: Rpt rnd 3

Rnd 5: 1 sc in the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in the next st. – 5 sts

Rnd 6: 1 sc in ea st. – 5 sts

Rnd 7: Rpt rnd 6

Rnd 8: 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts. – 6 sts

Rnd 9: 1 sc in ea st. – 6 sts

Rnds 10-11: Rpt Rnd 9.

Rnd 12: *2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts. Rpt from * once more. – 8 sts.

Rnd 13: 1 sc in ea st. – 8 sts

Rnds 14-15: Rpt Rnd 13

Rnd 16: 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 3 sts. – 9 sts

Rnd 17: 1 sc in ea st. – 9 sts

Rnds 18 – 19: Rpt Rnd 17

Rnd 20: 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts. – 10 sts

Rnd 21: 1 sc in ea  st. – 10 sts

Rnds 22 – 30: Rpt Rnd 21

Rnd 31: 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st. – 12 sts

Rnd 32: 1 sc in ea st. – 12 sts.

Slip stitch in the next few stitches to finish. Cut yarn and tie off leaving a long tail for sewing.

2nd Tine (Make 2):

Work Rounds 1 – 14 of the Main Tine. Sl st in the next few sts to finish after Rnd 14, cut yarn and tie off leaving a long tail for sewing.

3rd Tine (Make 2):


Work Rounds 1 – 12 of the Main Tine. Sl st in the next few sts to finish after Rnd 12, cut yarn and tie off leaving a long tail for sewing.

4th Tine (Make 2):

Work Rounds 1 – 10 of the Main Tine. Sl st in the next few sts to finish after Rnd 10, cut yarn and tie off leaving a long tail for sewing.

Antler Video Tutorial:

Antler Construction:

Video demo available below.

With polyester fiberfill and stick, stuff a tiny bit of filling in the tip of the Main Tine. Take one 12” 6mm pipe cleaner and fold in half, twisting loose ends together to form a flat loop. Insert twisted end into the Main tine, leaving a small bit of loop sticking out of the opening. Gently fill the bottom part of the Main Tine around the wire armature with poly fill. Roll and massage the piece to even out the filling – do not overstuff! It should still be flexible and posable on the armature.

Gently stuff the 2nd tine with a small amount of fiberfill. With tapestry needle, thread long yarn tail of the 2nd Tine. Position about halfway up the Main Tine and sew around the base of the 2nd tine.

Gently stuff the 3rd tine with a small amount of fiberfill.  With tapestry needle, thread long yarn tail of the 3rd tine and position at the base of the Main Tine. Sew the tine so that the base is partially attached. Leave about half of the base free to attach to the hat along with the base of the Main Tine.

Gently stuff the 4th tine with a tiny amount of fiberfill. Leave this tine free, it is attached to the Hat separately later.

Antler Construction Demo Video

Snout:

Snout is constructed by working four triangular shapes back and forth separately onto the same circle, adding seams at the end. Ch 1 at beginning of rnd does not count as first sc.

With Beige and 3.75 hook, make magic ring.

1st quarter:

Rnd 1: 8 sc into the ring. Join with a slip stitch in the first sc of the round.

Row 2: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 2 sc in the next st. – 4 sts

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 6 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 8 sts

Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 6 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 10 sts

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 8 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 12 sts

Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 10 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 14 sts

Row 8: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 12 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 16 sts

Row 9: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 14 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 18 sts

Row 10: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 16 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 20 sts

Row 11: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 18 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 22 sts

Row 12: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 20 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 24 sts

Rows 13 -14: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 24 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

2nd & 3rd Quarter:

With Gold, join yarn in either set of two stitches adjacent to the 1st quarter.

Row 1: Ch 1, 2 sc in the next st. 2 sc in the next st. – 4 sts

Row 2: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 4 sts

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in the next 2 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 6 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 6 sts

Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 8 sts.

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 8 sts

Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 6 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 10 sts

Row 8: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 10 sts

Rows 9 – 14: Rpt Row 8. – 10 sts

Cut yarn and tie off. Rpt for 3rd quarter on the other side of 1st.

4th Quarter (Top of snout)


With Main color, join yarn in first of remaining 2 sc.

Row 1: Ch 1, 2 sc in the same st, 2 sc in the next st. – 4 sc

Row 2: Ch 1, 1 sc in ea st. – 4 sc

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in the next 2 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 6 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 6 sts

Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 8 sts.

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 8 sts

Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 6 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 10 sts

Row 8: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 10 sts

Row 9: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 8 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 12 sts

Row 10: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 12 sts

Rows 11-14: Rpt Row 10

Do not tie off.

Snout Construction:

Video demo available.


Match the edge of the sides (2nd and 3rd quarter) to the top of the snout (4th quarter) and work a single crochet over the end stitch of both layers at once. Work 1 sc per row end across the edge to create a seam. Turn, work 2 slip stitches across the tip, then continue seam down the other side. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

With accent color beige, repeat the process on the other side connecting the bottom (1st quarter) to the sides (2nd and 3rd quarter). Work 1 sc stitch per row end across the edge to create a seam. Turn, work 2 slip stitches across the tip, then continue seam down the other side. Cut yarn and tie off.

Nose:

With 3.75 hook and accent color Black, chain 10.

Row 1: 4 hdc in the 2nd ch from the hook. 1 hdc in ea of the next 3 ch sts. 4 hdc in the next st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 3 sts. 4 hdc in the next st. Slip stitch in the opposite side of the chain stitch 5 stitches away.

Row 2: Sc in the back loop only (BLO) of the first st of the previous round. Working in the BLO, sc in ea stitch around. Join with a slip stitch to the first sc of the round.

Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Eyes (Make 3):

(Pictured above clockwise from left – Eye without finishing, 3rd eye with finishing, Left Eye with finishing)

The Eyes feature the bullion stitch, an advanced crochet stitch described in the stitches section. For help working this stitch, see my video tutorials, linked in the Notes section. If you do not want to tackle bullion, regular crochet stitches can be substituted. Substitute double crochet for the 5-bullion stitch and treble crochet for the 6-bullion stitch.

With 3.75 hook and accent color black, make magic ring.

Rnd 1: 2 sc, 1 hdc, 2 dc, 1 hdc, 2 sc, 1 hdc, 2 dc, 1 hdc into the ring. Sl st in first sc to join. Pull ring closed tightly. Cut yarn and tie off.

With accent color gold, join yarn in last st worked. Ch 3 to start.

Rnd 2: Work 2 5-bull sts in the first 4 sts. (2 6-bull, ch 1, 2 6-bull) in the next st. Work 2 5-bull sts in the next 5 sts. (2 6-bull, ch 1, 2 6-bull) in the next st. Work 2 5-bull sts in the next st. Sl st to join. Cut yarn and tie off.

Brow – Left eye:

With Wrong Side facing, attach black yarn three sts away from the 6-bull increase of either end of the eye.

Row 1: Sc in the same st. Sc in the next 2 sts. In the next ch space, work 3 hdc. 1 hdc in ea of the next 6 sts. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Row 2: Turn piece. With Right Side facing, attach beige yarn 4 stitches away from the end of the brow – attach new yarn around post of 4th from last stitch. Ch 3. 1 Back Post Double Crochet (BPDC) in the same st. 1 BPDC in ea of the next 8 sts. 1 Back Post Half Double Crochet (BPHDC) in ea of the next 4 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Brow – Right eye:

With Right side Facing, attach black yarn three sts away from the 6-bull increase of either end of the eye.

Row 1: Sc in the same st. Sc in the next 2 sts. In the next ch space work 3 hdc. 1 hdc in ea of the next 6 sts. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Row 2: Turn piece. With Wrong Side facing, attach beige yarn 4 sts away from the end of the brow – attach new yarn around post of the 4th from last st. Ch 3. 1 Front Post Double Crochet (FPDC) in the same st. 1 FPDC in ea of the next 8 sts. 1 Fack Post Half Double Crochet (FPHDC) in ea of the next 4  sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

 3rd Eye:

With Main Color, Join yarn in any stitch. 1 sc in each stitch around. In the chain space at the first point, work 2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc. Continue to single crochet to next point. Work 3 sc in the chain space. Continue to sc around, join with a sl st to first sc of the round.

Crescent Moon:

With Accent color White and 3.75 hook, ch 9.

In the 2nd ch from the hook, 2 sc. 2 hdc in ea of the next 2 ch sts. 3 dc in the next ch st. 2 hdc in ea of the next 2 ch sts. 2 sc in the next st. Sl st in the next st. Cut yarn and tie off.

Back Markings:


With 3.75 hk and Gold, Ch 40

2 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 2 dc in ea of the next 9 ch sts. 1 dc in ea of the next 9 sts. 3 dc in the next st. 2 dc in the next st.  1 dc in ea of the next 9 sts. 2 dc in ea of the next 10 sts.  Cut yarn and tie off.

With same hook and yarn, make magic ring.

Ch 3. 12 dc into the ring – tighten. Join with a sl st in first dc of the round.  Repeat for 2nd circle.

Fang:

With 3.75 mm hook and accent color white, follow Rounds 1-4 of the Main Tine. Cut yarn and tie off.

Braids:

Cut 48 30” long strands. Separate into 2 groups of 24, double up to form a loop and loop through the end of each earflap on any available loop, or directly into the crochet stitching if you prefer. Braid and tie off.

Assembly:

It’s okay and even preferable if you trap a lot of loops under the sewing for your detail pieces. Work slowly and conscientiously to get the loops and pieces arranged nicely.
The demo video for assembly is condensed at 25 times faster the speed I did it – it took me over 3 hours to assemble this! Take your time, but don’t be focused on getting it absolutely perfect because it won’t be.
Your hat will have a character of it’s own!

Using locking stitch markers, head form and tape measure, attach the components to the main hat. Start by centering the snout (nose already sewn on) so that the beige edge matches up against the brim on the center above the face. Stitch all components directly over the chain loops, making sure the securing thread attaches all the way down to the base of the hat, not just to the loops.  Next tackle the 3rd eye, then tack on the other two eyes (don’t recommend sewing them on fully yet).

After the eyes are positioned and partially attached, arrange the ears and tack them on using temporary securing methods such as locking stitch markers, safety pins, or tied yarn.

Next, position your main antlers – insert the pipe cleaner loop at the base of the antler all the way through the stitches on the base of the main hat so that you can grab the wire loop on the underside. Using the main color, thread yarn through this loop and secure the pipe cleaner to the surrounding stitches, then weave yarn over this base to cover it.

If all components look more or less aligned (I recommend looking from many angles and utilizing your tape measure A LOT) you can finish securing the eyes, ears, and antlers using the attached yarn tails. Use your yarn tension and stitches to make little adjustments to placement as you go if needed.

Then position the 4th tines, stuffed lightly if desired, on either side of the 3rd eye. The Crescent is placed below the 3rd eye and the fangs underneath the snout on the inside of the bottom seam. The back designs go on last.

With accent color yarns and a tapestry needle, make a few overlapping straight stitches down the center of the eye to give it shine.

Once all components are attached, weave in any remaining ends.

Assembly Video

The following video records my assembly process for this piece – it takes a while! The video is sped up at 25 times the normal rate, so while it isn’t great at being a tutorial, hopefully it gives an overall idea of how to go about putting it all together. Plus, it was fun for me to watch. BTW I’m wearing the Gnome Toboggan hat in this video 😉

Fringe Fur:

With Beige, cut a large bundle of 6” strands. Carve out a rounded cheek silhouette in the chain loops on the side of the hat, making a furrow to mark where you will fringe. Taking 2 strands at a time, loop the fringe into the chain loops and tighten, working along the loops on the furrow marked out. Repeat on the other side. – 25 (ish) fringe tassels each side should do it.

Repeat this process with accent color Orange, positioning over the top of the beige – 15-20 fringe tassels

Repeat with Main color, underneath the beige, centered on the earflap – 15 fringe tassels.

Give the fox a haircut – trim the “fur” until it is the length you want. Look over your new masterpiece and make any little adjustments, squishing the chain loops into their final places around the face features, etc. Spray block with water if desired.

This project was a really fun journey into shapes and textures that I hope others will customize and invent upon ❤

There are several elements in the costume for this piece I’d like to mention specifically: the skirt is sewn by me from upcycled fabric cut from unusable old clothes. The fingerless gloves are a modified version of my Rambler’s Mitts.

The fringed leather bag is also handmade by me, constructed from upcycled suede scraps crocheted together with cotton thread, with a hand sewn stone setting in the front.

The gorgeously magical moth clip is from the Etsy Shop The Forest Fae

I’ve watched too many internet videos of foxes jumping to not do this.

-MF

The Stump

Long ago, in a galaxy far far away, I used to write blog posts of themed crochet projects. These Pattern Galleries were mostly links to actual patterns, but occasionally contained inspiration-only images.

It was there that I first idea’d a crocheted stump ottoman. In the Pouf Collection, which I so aptly described as
” Poufs, ottomans, small stools, floor cushions (n.) – furniture that allows me to lay around on the ground like a lazy slob while giving off the appearance of being classy. “
I featured this image of a now-unavailable product from Anthropologie.

Welcome to the world of slow art! Because today I have an actual, finished product inspired by that post that feels like forever ago (it wasn’t, but you know…)

I did put a stump ottoman “firmly on my to-do list” in fact, but I didn’t actually start the project until 2017, when I purchased a slightly beat-up vintage ottoman and wanted to cover the nasty vinyl with something cooler. A removable, freeform cover in the shape of a stump would be just perfect.

I started by gathering all my little bits of white and beige scrap yarn and crocheting a flat, ringed circle. Spike stitches and varying my stitch height were strategies I used to give it a naturally odd appearence – totally symmetrical was not the goal.

This of course was the top of my stump, where the inner rings of the tree are showing. Once I had this circle big enough to cover the top of the ottoman, I folded it up and put it aside to start on the bark, which would go around the outside of the ottoman.

I chose to alternate a light brown with a dark brown, both #3 or #4 weight throughout the piece, and all worked as post stitches of various heights. I used a spike stitch to create a segmented texture in the bark.

I started the bark with a 4.00 mm hook. Working post stitches in worsted yarn with a 4.00 hook is pretty tough and slow going though, really – if you’re not used to it. I quickly grew bored with the bark and put the project aside, making some effort at progress but mostly be distracted by other things (like the budding Elf Coat project).

Well, after a time I reshuffled my life and ended up losing the ottoman that The Stump was to cover. But I kept my project, determining I could find another way to fill it. If I could convince myself to finish that awefully boring bark part.

I did hack away at it occasionally until about two months ago, when I decided to finish this thing for real. I switched hooks, sizing up to a 4.5 mm to speed the process along, and made the project a priority. I needed almost 70″ of bark in length to match the circumference of the flat top, and with some gritting of the teeth, I got it.

In addition to the freaky freeform eyeball knot I worked into the texture 😉

I took a few videos of me working along the way, for posterity. Here’s a demo video of the bark, showing how I worked the post stitches, dual strands, and spike stitches to create the texture.

Time to construct! Using locking stitch markers, I measured roughly how the bark would attach and then stitched it together.

I added a few more freeform rounds around the top to give it a nice gnarly edge, then turned my attention to finishing the main part of the cover.

The eyeball knot got stuffed full of polyester filling and then closed with rounds of stitches worked directly onto the back on the inside.

At this point I was ready to tackle the idea of how to fill this thing. Rather than hunt for a new ottoman over which this could fit, I needed a semi-firm filling that would give the furniture piece some weight and resistance.

A bean bag seemed like the logical conclusion, and I schemed up a bottom portion of the Stump that could be closed with a drawstring and tied shut, so that I could insert or remove a bag full of beans.

Then, beans happened! After I sewed the inner bag out of sheet scraps, I carefully poured a huge bag of styrofoam beans from the craft store in and stuffed that sucker.

Now that the filling part was worked out, I could turn my attention to the most fun part: adding all the growths.

Using a selection of earthy toned scrap yarns, I applied myself to creating three types of moss, two batches of lichens, extra bark, shelf fungus, and toadstools either worked directly onto the piece or sewn on after.

Once the last lichen was nestled in, I took a deep breath and a minute to pat myself on the back. Finally done!

And because it grew with me over time, my connection to this piece feels pretty personal. I dyed that lichen yarn, I spun that moss, I rescued those scraps. I cussed at that bark, delighted over those toadstools, cried on those tree rings. At first we were strangers, but now The Stump and I are good friends (I fear I will end up referring to it as Stumpie, now matter how hard I try not to).

The hedgehogs were excited.

Here’s the link to the Ravelry Project Page, which has the full compliment of pictures, if you want to give Stumpie a fave (oh no…).

I’m off to personify yarn somewhere else for a while, and hopefully not start any more four year fiber art projects (yeah right).

-MF

P.S – In case you spied the other crocheted accessories and were curious:
I’m wearing two other Morale Fiber designs in these photos – the Spiral Sweater and the Ivy Crown as a boot wrap. 😉
The pumpkin pictured and the felted hedgehogs are also made by me.

Lotus Duster Video Tutorial Part 4

Without much preamble, I’m excited to announce the addition of Part 4 of the Lotus Mandala Duster pattern crochet tutorial to my Youtube Channel!

Thanks to everyone who has liked and subscribed so far, it really does help build my channel and therefore help me keep going with my creating 🙂

You can find the video tutorial below or go to my channel to see all 4 parts released so far, as well as other awesome tutorial videos and demo. Part 4 covers Rounds 25-32, the chain-loop mesh portion of the outer sweater.

Style shown above is the Lotus Duster, without sleeves – with the Lotus Hood addition <a href="https://moralefiber.blog/2019/04/27/lotus-hood/&quot; target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" aria-label="<3

Parts 5 and 6 coming soon!

-MF

Return to Paca Planet

Sometimes for fun I’ll go back and see what I’ve been writing on this blog at the same time in previous years – it’s a nice perk of having years worth of posts, to see what kind of progress I’ve made. Apparently December and January is a common point in the year for me to be interested in working with spinning wool and working with handspun yarn. No surprise! It’s cold here during these months and the low light of the dead of winter keeps me inside focused on the coziest materials.

It all started with the Pounds of ‘Paca, a spinning venture in September of 2016 where I ordered waaaaaay too much alpaca fiber (on sale) and spun it all over the course of a couple of years – see Alpacalypse Now for the final yarns I came up with.

Not totally final though, because some of it went into my experimental Avocado Dye batch, coming out in shades of muted pinks and hazels, a really pretty and soft color to add to my giant pile of alpaca yarn. Some of THAT went into this bitchin’ avocado dreamcatcher 😉

The avocado dye batch was a year ago now, and I still have some dyestuffs left over sitting in the back of my fridge. I’m contemplating another natural dye run, but first I’m going to make some more progress on what I decided to do with all this excess camelid fluff.

It’s another large knit, similar in style to some of the loosely knit wraps I’ve made in the past:

But this one is made entirely from handspun yarn, in the pretty neutral and muted tones. I am not sure exactly how I will style this wrap, but I’m enjoying the mindless knitting for now. It’s worked in stockinette (the other large knits above are garter stitch) and I’m using continental style to speed up my purling (getting almost as fast as my continental knit stitch!)

I’ve also sprinkled in some dropped stitches and lines of garter to break up the texture!

There’s much to be said for instant gratification projects, but as I build my repertoire of skills, materials, and experiences, I grow more and more attached to the projects that follow me through my history as an artist. I’ve been finishing up a lot of long-term projects lately, causing me to reflect on one of the most valuable skills I’ve picked up through working my art:

Patience. Because nothing makes a piece more personal than having it grow with you over time. There have been many projects I have stuffed in a corner in frustration, or stowed away never knowing if it would be finished (and a few that actually did go into the trash forever). I always find that when those projects re-emerge, I’m armed with a new perspective or a fresh skill to bring to the table, as if the project was only waiting for that development all along and I didn’t know it ❤

Now if only those colors didn’t make me crave Neapolitan ice cream.

-MF

Amanita Muscaria Mushroom Pouch

Maybe creepy poison fungus seems more like an autumn thing, but there is some argument for the seasonality of the crochet project I have to share today!

It wasn’t meant to be seasonal – I created the Amanita Mushroom Pouch tutorial & free crochet pattern because I had requests to make a pattern for the above older photos from my Jack-O-Lantern and Morel Mushroom pouch blog posts. But since we’re on the subject, here’s an article about the connection of amanitas to winter tradition in Northern Europe and Russia. I’ve read other articles in the past, making wilder and less well-researched claims, which are fun if speculative.

Whether or not you buy that some of our holiday traditions are derived from hallucinating on mushroom toxins, the Amanita Muscaria Mushroom Pouch is a pretty cute little project to make curled up inside on a winter’s day, and look adorable tucked in the branches of the tree ❤

I’ve been making these for a few years and I’m glad to have finally created a pattern for them 🙂 Happily, I have BOTH a written pattern and a video tutorial (see my Youtube Channel or find it at the end of the pattern below)! Huzzah!

Amanita Muscaria Mushroom Pouch

Materials:
4.5 mm Hook
#4 Worsted weight yarn in white and red
Tapestry needle
Scissors

Stem Instructions:
Make Magic Ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring.
Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st – 12 sts
Rnd 3: Working in back loop only, 1 sc in ea st around – 12 sts in BLO
Rnd 4: *Sc in the next 2 sc, sc2tog. Rpt around – 9 sts
Rnds 5-6: 1 sc in ea sc.

Rnd 7: Working in the back loop only (BLO), 1 sc in ea sc


Rnd 8: Working in the front loop only left from Rnd 7, *1 hdc and 1 sc in the next st, 1 sc in the next st. Rpt around.


Rnd 9: Skipping over Rnd 8 and continuing into the sc stitches of Rnd 7, 1 sc in ea sc.
Rnds 10-13: 1 sc in ea sc around

Sl st in the next few sts, do not tie off. Begin crochet chain loop. Chain 100-125. Once chain is complete, slip stitch on the opposite side of the stem from the beginning of the chain. Add a few more slip sts around to secure. Cut yarn and tie off.

Cap Instructions:

With red yarn, make Magic Ring.
Rnd 1: Ch 2. 10 hdc into the ring.
Rnd 2: Ch 2. 1 hdc in the same st. 2 hdc in the next st. *1 hdc in the next st, 2 hdc in the next st. Rpt around


Rnds 3-4: 1 hdc in ea st around.
Rnd 5: 1 sc in ea st around.

Sl st in the next few sts to secure, then cut yarn and tie off. Weave in all ends on the stem and cap using a tapestry needle and scissors.

With a length of white yarn, thread the tapestry needle. Insert needle from under the cap to the top, leaving some tail for sewing in. The spots are made from working french knots, an embroidery technique that wraps yarn around the embroidery needle before completing the stitch. For instructions on this part, see the video at 17:00.

Video Tutorial

Also, for fun, here’s me in an Amanita Muscaria Mushroom hat, which is made with french knots bespeckling my Sweetheart Beret crochet pattern, a.k.a the Forest Girl Beret ( the antlered version).

Well, that’s all the pictures of yarn mushrooms I’ve got… Just kidding, it isn’t. But that’s all I’m going to cram into this post. I hope you all have a super safe and lovely holiday season ❤

-MF

Lotus Duster Tutorial Part 3

Tippy-top on my to-do list is finishing the Lotus Duster video tutorial, in no small part because I’m getting very excited about seeing the finished product! You can find Parts 1 & 2 on my Youtube Channel here.

Each time I make a new one, I fall in love with it all over again ❤ I mean, not to toot my own horn or anything 😉 So putting together Part 3 of this video was very rewarding, because in Rnds 17 – 24 we are adding armholes and really starting to shape the central mandala into the pretty ruffley sweater form.

This material is looking like a soft doily dream – it’s the 100% cotton yarn, in fine stranded texture, ripped out from a number of old thrifted sweaters. Recycling sweater yarn is a lot of hard work, but it’s hard to beat in terms of quality, quantity, and overall cost for these Duster pieces, and nothing gives the piece a more retro vintage-y feel than upcycled yarn.

Okay, blathering completed – enjoy Part 3 and remember to like & subscribe, link me, and share me on Facebook if you want to support more slick FREE content 🙂 🙂

❤ ❤

-MF

Pattern Gallery: The Krampus Collection

Though I’ve mostly drifted away from doing collections of themed patterns on the blog, I had to come out of retirement when I saw a few new Krampus fiber art goodies floating around the internet this season!

This fun and silly tradition has gained so much popularity in the United States recently, and as I mentioned in my original Krampus Hat post, my hometown hosts one of the most established Krampus Parades in the country every year. I’m proud to know some of the awesome people who help put it on!

I didn’t get to make the parade this year, so in compensation I’m offering a dose of Krampus via the awesome patterns and projects that I’ve spied recently: enjoy the Krampus Collection, with the links to the original artists and patterns below!

  1. Krampus Hat by Morale Fiber:

    Of course, I’m going to go ahead and get myself out of the way here! This is my Krampus Hat pattern from a few years ago, which actually was originally a goat/lamb hat pattern before it got a makeover! This super thick textured hat is achieved by making tons of tiny chain loops – a process you can see via my Youtube demo video. You can find the pattern for FREE on my blog here.

2. Krampus by Christina Staley

This AWESOME Krampus amigurumi figure is crocheted with worsted weight yarn and comes out to be an impressive 20″ tall! He has all the extras included, like chains, scary tongue, and sack for collecting naughty children – you can get the pattern via Ravelry here.

3. Krampus Hat by Linsday Scarey

One for the bistitchuals out there! This gorgeous and classy Krampus hat uses multi-strand knitting (something I’ve always been too intimidated to try) to create a ring of prancing christmas monsters around the crown of this superb and comfy looking beanie. Pattern is available for FREE via Ravelry here.

4. Krampus Christmas Ornament by Ann D’Angelo

Love Krampus but don’t have a lot of extra crafting time on your hands? This little amigurumi ornament can grace your tree in no time, and the pattern is available for just a couple bucks from Ravelry here. I love his cranky little face! The pattern even includes little “victims” – adorable 🙂

5. Krampus by Sonia Childers

You guys, I almost peed my pants in excitement when I saw this awesome Krampus hat by Sonia Childers in her Ravelry Store. Look at the awesomeness! It even has a beard! And a nose warmer! She has a bunch of other amazing hat patterns as well, but I really would love to make this one sometime, and even maybe mesh some of her elements with some from my Krampus hat pattern – so cool Sonia! You rock!

6. Gruss Vom Krampus by Stephanie Pokorny

Last but not least (and unfortunately not a pattern) is the incredible Gruss vom Krampus costume made by Stephanie Pokorny of the inimitable Crochetverse. Guys, look at those teeth. Most Krampus patterns are kinda cute too but this one actually gives me the willies, which is the highest accomplishment a Krampus crochet project can achieve in my opinion! You can find the original post for this project on Facebook here, and you should definitely like and follow the Crochetverse page if you haven’t already because she does incredible stuff like this ALL. THE. TIME.

I hope this collection inspires you to crochet something awesome, or at least to not be too naughty this season 😉 Thanks for visiting!

-MF