Foundation Tunisian Stitch

Let’s jump right in today because it’s going to be a quick one! If you’re a human who crochets, odds are good that you don’t LOVE working into the bothersome stitches of a foundation chain. I know I don’t.

So when I needed a technique that would allow me to add length to the end of a forward pass row in Tunisian crochet, I fiddled until I got what I wanted: A Tunisian version of foundation crochet, which works the bottom stitches and the first row of stitches simultaneously.

No long twisty strands. No chaining and rejoining. AND it helps keep the bottom from curling!

Here is my video of this technique, the first of what I hope is many Tunisian tutorial videos – use the Foundation Tunisian Stitch as the base for your Tunisian crochet pieces by working FTS instead of the base chain and first row, or use it to add length on Tunisian pieces easily ❤

For more Tunisian tutorials, peep the links below the video!

Tunisian Simple Stitch Tutorial

Tunisian Knit Stitch Tutorial

Tunisian Simple Stitch – Increases and decreases

Thanks for visiting! ❤

-MF

Kismet Poncho

Sometimes I think I’m a really slow designer compared to other crochet artists out there! When I dream up an idea, and hone it down, it may still be months before I perfect it and apply it to a project satisfactorily, and then more time still to sculpt the pattern and create the materials to teach it.

The Kismet Square was originally created for an entirely different design, one that I still have my eye on for the future – but that pattern was taking way too long!

So I settled on creating a simpler garment featuring the Kismet Square, and doing a full-length crochet pattern tutorial video for both the squares and for assembling & completing a poncho from them!

The entire Kismet Poncho pattern can be accessed for FREE exclusively on my YouTube channel videos (with written captions) or get the written pattern with tutorial photos as a downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store! ❤ Keep scrolling for the free video ❤

It’s not the project I originally intended, but it’s the perfect project for the upcoming autumn weather and the perfect addition to my YouTube free pattern offerings – so the Kismet Poncho was born, and it was… well… fate 😉

The Kismet Poncho features a 12-round crochet square with a floral circular focal point that expands outward into easy repeat rows of stitches, clusters and shells. The alternating solid and openwork stitches create a boldly textured appeal inspired by the rich layered patterning of Middle Eastern decorative traditions.

Worked in various colors of sleek #4 worsted weight yarn, this one-size-fits-all poncho uses 4 squares to create a gorgeous statement piece with or without fringe. The pattern itself is easy to adapt with different yarn and hook sizes, and the rounds of varied stitching showcases any range of color combinations you can dream!

Finished Measurements:

Length – 30” collar to tip, not including fringe, 20” collar to short edge, not including fringe
Width – 45” across from short edge to short edge

Materials:

5.5 mm hook
#4 weight Acrylic Yarn (I used a blend of yarns, all acrylics such as Caron Simply Soft and Lion Brand Heartland) – ~ 800-900 yds
Scissors
Tapestry Needle
6” book or length of cardboard for cutting fringe

Now on to the videos! Find Gauge, stitches, and pattern notes below the first video ❤

Kismet Poncho Part 1

Keep scrolling for Parts 2 & 3!

Gauge: 3 sts & 1 row = 1” in dc

Stitches & Abbreviations:
Chain (ch)
Double Crochet (dc)
Slip Stitch (sl st)
Half Double Crochet (hdc)
Treble Crochet (tr)

Special Stitches:
Magic Ring: An adjustable ring made by wrapping the yarn around the hand or fingers, and using the loop to crochet the first round of a circular crochet piece. Ring is closed by pulling the loose tail tightly after completing the round.
Shell: A set of 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc in the same space.
Petal: A series of hdc, dc, tr, arranged in a mirrored shape within a single stitch or space.
Cluster: Several stitches worked in the same st or space, leaving the last loops on the hook. When all stitches are worked, YO and pull through all loops on the hook.
Dc3tog: A decrease where 1 dc is worked in each of the next 3 indicated stitches, leaving the last loop on the hook for each dc stitch. The complete the stitch, YO and draw through all remaining loops on the hook. 1 dc3tog made.

Abbreviations
Skip (sk)
Next (nxt)
Each (ea)
Space (sp)
Stitch (st)
Beginning (beg)

Kismet Poncho Part 2

Kismet Poncho Part 3

I hope this design inspires you to create something you or your friends & family will love! And if you have any questions whatsoever, please don’t hesitate to contact me here or via any of my social media channels 🙂

Peace!

-MF

Freeform #1

For years now I’ve had my eye on creating a piece in the classic Freeform style, a method of crochet that rejects the use of pattern or pre-planned formations and uses highly textural and varied crochet stitches to create odd, asymmetric pieces called “scrumbles.”

Though any crocheting without a pattern could technically be called freeform or freestyle, I differentiate the classic Freeform technique as having a few key characteristics: lack of pattern or overall plan, emphasis on chaotic form and texture over cohesive visual harmony, and reliance on several iconic motifs common in modern freeform (such as spirals, bullions, puffs, and other textural stitches).

Freeform scrumbles are finished bits of crochet that are then arranged and connected to form the final piece – anything from a freestanding “painting” of forms to a highly ornate coat to furniture covers (I dream of freeforming over an entire couch one day…).

Sometimes sewn together, sometimes connected via an openwork web of chains as in traditional Irish lace – the scumbles are like a puzzle you get to create AND solve!

After looking to such Freeform crochet geniuses as Prudence Mapstone and Hannah Martin of Of Mars, perusing some playlists for Freeform shapes on Youtube, and endlessly scrolling the Freeform Crochet World Group on Facebook, I finally collected a bunch of yarn and started scumbling.

And scrumbling.

And scrumbling.

After 8 months of slow progress, and lots of learning curves, I finally put the finishing touches on Freeform #1!

I knew it would be a shawl from the start, but the rest of the journey of this project was a complete and utter mystery until it was finally finished.

I must have arranged and rearranged the pieces so many times, in so many combinations! There are even a few eyeballs stuck in there, left over from practicing bullion eyes for the Forest Guide Hat.

The colors were chosen to be an earthy rainbow, with lots of gem tones (my favorite). Plenty of odd bits of hand-dyed and hand-spun yarn were included that I also created – which adds to the unique and personal “process” art touch.

At some point along the way, I started becoming (more) obsessed with moths, and I couldn’t stop picturing this piece as moth wings, or at least some winged bug-eyed thing – so the prism goggles came out to play 😉

I’m overall thrilled with how this piece turned out – better than my expectations, to be sure! My first full-size freeform will be staying in my closet as I don’t think I could bear to part with it.

It’s great to create something that is impossible to write a pattern from! These days it’s hard to crochet anything that I don’t start to consider writing a pattern for (cue the incessant note-taking), but with freeform, that’s obviously not an option…

Although I may do some tutorial videos for the techniques I used at some point!

If you want to try out freeform but don’t want to commit to a huge project, my Pixie Pocket Belt Tutorial series uses freeform techniques to create cute, quick costume projects.

This shawl really pushed my boundaries and challenged me, and I value it all the more because of that.

-MF

Video Game Guy Backpack Tutorial

Let’s say for the sake of imagination that there’s a story featuring an adventurous youth and his acerbic canine best friend, who live in a slightly macabre and trippy video game world and have adventures. We’ll call it “Adventuring Friends.”


I think that in that world, they’d probably have a sentient portable video game console. We’ll call him Video Game Guy and he’s definitely not based on anything that is trademarked 😉
Wouldn’t it be cute to crochet a backpack featuring this colorful companion? I think so too. Let’s do it! (P.S – I got this idea originally from Instagram crochet artist @mioforestcrochet and made my own version- please check her out and give her some likes!)


I hope you enjoy this free crochet tutorial for the Video Game Guy Backpack! I’ve included all of my notes, and as much bonus info as I could capture – if you have any questions on how I did any of the steps, please don’t hesitate to ask ❤

Update!: This design now has a Ravelry project Page, if you want to favorite it & save for later ❤

Video Game Guy Tutorial

This tutorial covers the instructions for making all the pieces of the Video Game Guy Backpack, but you can easily use this pattern to create a stuffed friend or pillow out of him, too!

Materials:
I Love This Cotton! (#4 weight, 100% cotton, about 150 yds per skein) 2 skeins in light blue and 1 skein in teal
Assorted scrap yarn colors: Lighter blue for the screen (I held in a strand of Glow-in-the-Dark yarn as well, to make the screen glow. I got that yarn from here, years ago). I also used scrap red, yellow, green, and dark blue for the buttons, and black for the accents.
Scrap fabric (optional)
Safety eyes (optional)
Button
Scissors, Tapestry needle, and locking stitch markers (for assembly)

Hook: 3.5 mm hook
Gauge: Not critical. Should be tight, as you don’t want a very hole-y fabric.

Special Stitches: Linked Double Crochet (LDC) – get the free tutorial from my blog here.
Magic Ring (MR): A great tutorial from Planet June here
Notes: I use Ch 2 to turn on the rows of linked double crochet instead of the traditional 3-chain turn, I find it works better with my gauge on this project – you can substitute 3 if it works better for you! 🙂

Instructions

Front & Back (Make 2, 1 front 1 back, in light blue)

Ch 37.

Row 1: 1 Dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 LDC in ea of the next 34 sts. – 35 sts
Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 34 sts.
Rows 3-27: Rpt Row 2.

If you are making the Front rectangle,
Cut yarn and tie off.
If you are making the Back rectangle and you want a fold-over flap with a loop, continue on in pattern for 7 more rows, placing a chain loop of stitches in the middle of the last row (skip the chain loop if you are making a pillow or stuffie). I wanted the loop more on the inside (showing the button less) so I made the loop on the second to last row, and then crocheted over that row with the loop held on the inside, out of the way.

Side (1 continuous piece, in teal)
Ch 12.
Row 1: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 LDC in ea of the next 9 ch sts. – 10 sts
Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 9 sts.
Rows 3-77: Rpt Row 2.
Cut yarn and tie off.
Compare the side strip to your front and back panels. It should have enough rows to match all the way around the 3 sides of the front & back rectangles, with plenty of room to turn the fabric at the corners. You can adjust the number of side rows here if needed.

Screen Face (Make 1, lighest blue, white, or preferred color – I held 1 strand of glow yarn in with the regular cotton light blue):
Ch 24.
Row 1: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 LDC in ea of the next 21 sts. – 22 sts.
Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 LDC in ea of the next 21 sts. – 22 sts
Rows 3-12: Rpt row 2.
SC border: Ch 1, rotate. Work 2 sc in the side of every LDC row-end, making 3 sts in each corner to turn. 1 sc in each st across the bottom (the foundation chain), making 3 sts at the corner to turn. 2 sc in the side of every LDC row-end. Stop at final corner.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Here’s a picture of his face glowing! Sorry for the terrible image quality here. But it does glow!

Arms (Make 2, light blue)
MR.
Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring. Tighten.
Rnd 2: 1 sc in ea of the next 6 sc – 6 sts.
Rnds 3-18: Rpt Row 2
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Legs (Make 2, teal)
MR.
Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring. Tighten.
Rnd 2: (1 sc in the next sc, 2 sc in the next sc) rpt around – 9 sts
Rnd 3: 1 sc in ea of the next 9 sc. – 9 sts
Rnds 4-12: Rpt rnd 3.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Arrow Pad (Make 1, yellow)
MR
Rnd 1: Ch 2( does not count as first dc). Dc 12 into the ring. Tighten. Join with a sl st in the first dc of the round.
Rnd 2: *Ch 3. Dc in the same stitch. 2 dc in the next st. 1 dc in the next st. Working down the side of the last dc stitch made, slip stitch 2 toward the round below. Work 1 sl st in the same stitch of the round below. Sl st in the next free dc. Rpt from * 3 more times to form all 4 arrow directions.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Red & Green Button (Make 1 each)
My green yarn was small, so my green button was naturally smaller as I would imagine a Video Game Guy to have a smaller green button than red button 😉 But you can substitute hdc’s for dc’s to make the green button smaller if your yarn is the same weight as the rest!
MR
Rnd 1: Ch 2, 12 dc into the ring, tighten. Sl st in the first dc to join.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Blue Button (Make 1)
My blue yarn is small, so my blue button is small – you can substitute hdc’s for the dc’s and sc’s for the hdc’s to make the button smaller, if you are using the same weight yarn 🙂
MR.
Rnd 1: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc). (3 dc into the ring, 3 hdc into the ring) 3 times. Join with a sl st in the first dc of the round.
Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Straps:
I forgot to note how many stitches long my straps were, but I ended up making them too long anyway so that’s that 😛 So here’s a short description (skip the straps if you’re making a pillow or stuffie) :
Chain a length equal to the length you want your straps, or slightly under (a lot of weight will stretch them some).
Row 1: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 1 LDC in every other stitch across.
Row 2: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 LDC in every other stitch across.
Repeat for as many rows as you want to get the width of your strap. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Black Details:
Chain small lengths, single crochet back down the chains. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Lining (Fabric, optional)
I wanted to make my Video Game Guy pretty sturdy (sturdy enough to house an actual portable game console) so I decided to line the inside of the backpack with fabric to reinforce it. I used scrap fabric and just traced my main pieces (the front side and the side rectangle) onto the fabric to get my shapes.

I used my serger for quick construction (it’s ugly, but it’ll mostly be hidden).

And added a channel at the top of the lining for a drawstring, because hey. I’m fancy. I used my regular sewing machine for that part.

Assembly

Using a bunch of locking stitch markers, line your side piece so it runs all the way around both sides of the Front & Back rectangle, with plenty of space at the corners.

Using light blue yarn, join at one end of the Side. To create a seam, work through 2 layers of crochet fabric at once. Single crochet down the side, working 2 single crochet per row-end, under the sides of the LDC stitches at the edge.

If you prefer, you could just use a tapestry needle and yarn to sew it together, but I think the single crochet seam creates a sturdy shape and a crisp edge and is worth the extra patience required!

When turning a corner, work 5 sc into the corner stitch to keep the corner sharp. Continue to work 2 sc into the sides of each LDC row end on the Side, but remember to keep 1 sc per CHAIN stitch on the Front rectangle, as you will now be working across the bottom of the foundation chain on the Front rectangle since you’re working the short side.

Continue on to turn another 5-sc corner and finish the seam up the other long side, leaving one short side (the one with the flap) un-seamed and open.

Repeat this process to seam on the back side.

At this point, weave in any ends on all of your extra pieces that AREN’T going to be used to sew the piece on. Don’t forget like me and accidentally weave in the long yarn tails used for your sewing threads 😀

For the screen face, place your safety eyes or other form of face-making onto the screen before sewing it on to the front of the backpack. I left the top of the screen open and un-seamed, for use as another small pocket:

I then added the arms and legs, unstuffed, by carefully seaming the top opening onto the flat side piece surfaces.

Next came aaaaaaalll the surface details: Arrow Pad, Colored Buttons, and black details are all seamed onto the surface of the front piece using the yarn tails and tapestry needle.

The final hurdle to jump before I finished the piece was the straps. Now, as I mentioned earlier, I made the straps too long. Possibly because I underestimated how much they would stretch, or possibly because I was just wrong 😀

Regardless, I used locking stitch markers to test-place the straps, inserting more strap on the inside of the backpack if I needed to shorten it more. Since mine is getting a lining anyway, it won’t matter if there’s a little extra strap poking around in there.

Once they were arranged to my liking, I used the tapestry needle and the remaining yarn tails to sew them into place on the top and bottom. After messing around a little more with the flap and straps, I was ready insert my lining.

I have said it before and I’ll say it again – it’s really scary to place something you’ve lovingly stitched for hours with your hook and soft yarn, right into the gaping maw of the stabby-stabby machine. But the more I sew on crochet, the more I get used to it and the more I learn, so away I went! Stabby Stabby!

I sewed reinforcement stitching on the straps, and sewed all along the top rim of the backpack with a straight stitch, keeping an eye on my tension settings. I also added a round button on the inside front of the bag, so the top flap would button down but the button wouldn’t show on the face of the Game Guy.

Lastly, I added the drawstring. Exceedingly happy with my project, I hastened to type up this tutorial so that others might make their own Video Game Guy! This special piece is going to my friend for her birthday ❤

I hope you enjoy making this project, and maybe try out different versions – a simplified project might be to make a stuffed friend or pillow out of VGG! Or even a smaller patch version? ❤

If you liked this free tutorial and want to show off your project, Morale Fiber has a pretty kick-butt Facebook Group now with ALL KINDS of awesome fantasy, boho, hippie, nerdy, and alternative crochet projects shared by fiber fans ❤ Check it out and see if you’d like to join us here!

-MF

Acanthus Top

Life has seemed at once hectic and uneventful recently, my “normal” summer months stretching on under the strain of the daily news and the smell of spray sanitizer, but my evenings peaceful and filled with fragrant breeze and birdsong.

This summer, is not like last summer. But my gratitude has not changed. For the friends I have, for the capabilities I am given, and for each day, whether it’s spent alone or not – after all I’ve learned a lot in the past year about how we are all connected.

During this isolationary idyll, I’ve designed a VERY comfy and cute top that you’ll want in every color: the Acanthus Top, now available in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Pattern Store!

A lush and leafy bralette top perfect for the laziest of summer days! This crochet crop top features wide, lacy straps that interweave to form a racer-back shape, maximizing comfort without sacrificing prettiness. Shell detail edging trims the entire piece and frames your bodice in pretty flowing lines. The Acanthus Top is designed for a looser, more natural fit – like a cross between a bralette and a halter top!

Combining a structured silhouette with a peek-a-boo center, this crop top pattern covers SIX sizes (X-Small – 2XL) with detailed written instructions and step-by-step photo tutorials. I really aimed to make this one of the most versatile and wearable Morale Fiber halter top designs yet 🙂

In Mediterranean culture and art, the Acanthus plant symbolized long life and immortality and was a regular feature of classical architecture ❤ I hope you love this new design and that it has a long life in your closet!

The Acanthus Top was the first design of mine to be produced using a full complement of pattern testers and they did an AWESOME job helping me hone this design and expand the size offerings. I plan more tests in the future – if you are interested in participating, I make the call-outs in my Facebook Group, the Magic Fantastic Crochet Atelier. Join us and keep a look out for the next test!

Meanwhile I’ll be taking my Acanthus Top out to lounge in a hammock as soon as possible! 🙂

-MF

Sunflower Lotus Vest

It’s been a while since I made the Lotus Vest, the Free-Size circular shawl version of my Lotus Mandala design, seen also in the Lotus Duster (all free patterns available on my blog – just follow the links!)

So there I was, trying to use up some of my Quarantine stash while on Staycation, and I plumbed the depths of the cotton bin to find a lot of the Lion Brand 24/7 cotton yarn – the same kind I used to make the original piece.

Stashbusting achieved! I moved the armholes a little closer together, and skipped a few of the chain mesh rows – but here’s my latest version of the Lotus Circular Vest, crocheted with sunflowers in mind 🙂

If you don’t prefer written patterns, I do have a video tutorial for the Lotus Duster, a similar pattern, which can be make sleeveless as well. Get that by going to the my YouTube Channel Playlist here.

There’s also a great Dutch version of this pattern, translated by Iris of Een Mooi Gebaar – you can get that for FREE on her website, or get the downloadable, portable, printable Dutch translation PDF pattern file in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry store!

Stay cool out there! ❤

-MF

P.S – the crocheted top I’m wearing in these pictures is the Valkyrie Top!


Hedge Witch Hat PDF

No sooner than I released the totally-free crochet pattern for the Hedge Witch Hat, did I realize I wanted to add some tweaks to the general shape of it! Typical of me really – I’ve never once put out a pattern that I didn’t want to keep modifying in some way. Unfortunately, not matter how finicky I get, I could always keep changing a bit here and a bit there, and so at some point I just have to commit and get it done with.

The lovely Sarina modeling her custom Hedge Witch Hat!

After all, I can come back to it later. Which is exactly what I’ve done with here! In this case the design modifications are minor – I wanted the silhouette to be a LITTLE more curved and forward-set.

Because the two variations are similar but each with it’s own charm, I couldn’t decide which I liked better – so the pattern update includes the instructions for BOTH varieties!

You can get the updated, totally free version of this easy and cute crochet pattern on my blog via the original post.

The new version is also getting the spiffy PDF treatment – so now the entire updated pattern is available as a purchaseable, downloadable, ad-free PDF!

Get the PDF crochet pattern now through my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store!

Paid patterns make up the vast majority of my business income so if you like this pattern and want to use it more in the future, please consider supporting me by buying the paid version. And of course, more support means more great Morale Fiber designs in the future 😉

Sharing my art is my passion and I couldn’t do it without you ❤ Read on for more info on the Hedge Witch Hat PDF!

This quick, easy, and stylish little witch hat is not just a cute version of a Halloween favorite – it may just charm its way into your everyday wardrobe! Great made with any #4 worsted weight acrylic yarn, this simple design comes in two style options with plenty of room for customizing with color or adorable add-ons like flowers or patches.

Worked in half-double crochet, this pattern utilizes a special technique to keep the seam straight called the Switchback Join – instructions and tutorial link are included in the written pattern along with lots of the usual features – clear tutorial photos, step-by-step directions, stitch counts, and all the details you need to make this quick project!

Materials:
3.75 mm hk
#4 weight yarn – Approximately 200-250 yds
Scissors & tapestry needle

Gauge: 4 sts & 3 rows – 1” in hdc

Finished measurements: ~ 25″ on the inside, 36″ brim on the outside, 9-10″ height

Types: A (Pointier, black & dark gray versions), B (Rounder, light gray and tan versions)

All instructions are in English in U.S terminology.

I’m already plotting some crochet patches to put on these babies – perhaps a Crochet Patch pattern series is in order, no? 🙂 I have a couple good candidates already! Follow the links below for more Free Patterns:

At the center of the Embla Vest (pictured above) is the Tree of Life motif, which you can get for free on my blog and would make a great patch!

I’ll probably do a little crescent moon on the hat I’m working on now, which is navy and blue. You can get the instructions for the Crescent Moon motif where it appears as part of my other free pattern, the Forest Guide Hat.

Happy Casting!

-MF

Henbit and Housekeeping

The month of May is usually a busy one for me, and this one has not been an exception so far, even despite local shutdown regulations! Read on for a bit about the projects I’m doing now and what I’ve got coming up ❤

Henbit Pixie Belt

With the weather warming I’m working outside and hiking around even more, enjoying nature in isolation and keeping an eye on the new plants springing up everywhere.

One particularly pretty little spring plant is Henbit, a bright fuschia-flowered plant that grows in scrubby areas and fields, which is an edible weed for humans as well as tasty for wildlife like hummingbirds. This plant was the inspiration for my latest Pixie Pocket Belt piece, for which it is named.

The mitts I’m wearing above are from my free Rambler’s Mitts pattern.

The Pixie Pocket Belts are projects I’ve been drawn to for years, and though I never make two the same, I did create a comprehensive tutorial guide for making your own unique creation – that’s available for free on my blog or in PDF format for a small fee.

These cute & useful costume pieces are a chance for me to flex my freestyle muscles. I love the multimedia aspect too, using beads and upcycled fabrics and metal details to create something really magical.

Freeform Shawl

The Pixie Belts I’ve made over the years have been technically “freeform” (meaning crocheted without a pattern or overall plan), though they are a bit different from the classic freeform style made popular by such incredible crochet artists as Prudence Mapstone and Hannah Martin of Of Mars.

Pixie Belt “Kelp” pictured above featured a bullion stitch pouch & a freeform seashell pouch

I’ve wanted to tackle a more recognizably freeform crochet piece and recently began practicing the various motifs that are common in this style, such as spirals, bullions, and crab stitch.

Some of the videos I’ve been watching have been both useful for the freeform project and useful to help me hone my video tutorial skills 🙂 I’ve saved some of my favorites to my Channel playlists and I’ll keep adding more – find those collected here on Youtube and like & subscribe to my channel to get more updates!

I’ve completed most of the pieces I want to include in this freeform shawl, so I’m currently in the process of arranging and joining them. It feels great to challenge myself, and I’m learning and making lots of mistakes which is good ❤

Out of Office May 20-24

At the end of every May for the last 9 years, I’ve attended the big spring festival Elf Fest with my local community of nature-celebrators. This May, of course, it has been canceled. It’s the responsible thing to do and I’m happy that my friends are all safe – still, it’s a wrench for me and the rest of the crew.

Despite not having the festival to attend, I am going to go ahead and take that time off anyway, to unplug a little more and slow down 🙂 So I’ll be Out of Office from May 20 through May 24, returning May 25 to answer any questions and comments you might have left during that time!

This stunning handmade moth clip from The Forest Fae is my constant companion these days…

I have a loooooooooong list of upcoming crochet designs – so many that I think I’ll need help soon! I’m looking into starting a little group – if you are interested in pattern testing for Morale Fiber be sure to follow me on Facebook, join my main crochet group the Magic Fantastic Crochet Atelier, or subscribe to my blog through e-mail! ❤ I’ll make the announcement across these channels when it comes time.

As always, I’m really grateful for everyone out there who purchases, supports, tags, shares, comments, likes, and recommends my work – I do it for you! I love you! Thank you! 🙂 🙂 🙂

-MF

Cobweb Wrap

I’ve always loved the way that fog reveals through tiny glimmering water droplets the cobwebs that weave together the grasses of a field. These little intricate fiber blobs go unnoticed until the water reflection lights them up, revealing a tiny world of complexity.

It was after these shining, tensile treasures that I named my newest design, the Cobweb Wrap – available now as a PDF crochet pattern in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Store! Keep reading for more info on the pattern or click the links to buy directly ❤ Thank you!

I’d been thinking about cobwebs a lot recently, due to receiving a really unique donation to my costume closet – The faerie costume of Texas Renaissance Festival participant “Cobweb the Faerie” known in our realm by her human alias, Laurie Hummel. My friend Jason inherited this item from a friend of a friend while living in Texas, and then mailed it to me, bequeathing me the title and associated memorabilia.

I felt an appropriateness about it, first of all because “cobweb” = a spinning of fibers to create a pattern, which seems a lot like what I do, and so there exists an affinity between my art and spiders as a concept (my relationship with actual spiders is ambivalent at best).

It’s an honor to be entrusted with someone else’s magic – I felt a similar sense of inheritance when I bought my secondhand spinning wheel. I felt the need to do a kind of tribute with Cobweb making an appearance modeling a design. Once I determined this, the perfect concept came forward as if it were ready and waiting.

I’ve wanted to try my hand at a gorgeous pineapple lace wrap similar to this one since it first made my romantic be-doilied heart skip a beat on Pinterest some years ago. This nascent idea for a delicate circular lace wrap/skirt, being so much like a web already, seemed appropriate for the character and the costume even matched with the thread I had ready for the project ❤

What I came up with is as simple as it is versitile – the large, 60″ circular center opening is controlled by a drawstring, to make both an adjustable waistband and an adjustable opening to drape around the shoulders.

I also added different length options – a shortened version of this pattern makes a swing-y skirt or vintage style lace shawl – instructions are given on how to work for Short, Midi, and Long lengths.

The foundation of the pattern is adjustable by a given amount, so that you can make this in larger hooks and yarns and adjust the pattern as necessary – more description of how to modify is given in the pattern notes, like for this DK weight version:

Wear ALL the different ways – shawl, poncho, wrap, layered skirt, lace dress! Read on for the details on materials and description of the pattern 🙂

Cobweb Wrap

As delicate and gossamer as the silken threads that line the fields, the Cobweb Wrap is an impressive lace piece designed to be shown off!

The apparent intricacy belies the ease of a classic and simple lace pattern: the crochet pineapple. The popularity of this design over centuries is due to its accessibility – with just a few basic crochet stitches and a set of intuitive repeats, massive webs of beautiful lace can be woven easily!

Though named the pineapple, this design is a gorgeous geometric pattern that could be imagined many ways – peacock feathers, leaves, and even little spider bodies (creepy cute!). The pattern is in detailed written format, with 75+ tutorial photos and full video how-to for the hem (which you can access for free by following the link).

This wearable lace piece is convertible from skirt to shawl/wrap, includes instructions for resizing for different yarns and gauges with optional lengths of Short, Midi, and Long – and features the Pointed Pineapples technique, which creates a charming tattered silhouette that gives the wrap a romantic vintage feel ❤

Get the pattern now in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store!

Materials:
3.25 mm hook, 3.50 mm hook, 3.75 mm hook
#5 Crochet Thread – (I used Artiste brand 100% Acrylic thread, in 370 yard cones) – 6 cones for the full skirt
Scissors
Tapestry needle
Ribbon yarn or some kind of tie for drawstring

Sizes: Short, Midi, Long
Finished Measurements: ~60″ Top Opening, Up to ~32″ (Long)
All instructions are written in English, in US terminology.

More about my outfit: Cobweb the Faerie’s original costume pieces appear mixed and matched with my own additions – The light green flowery top, purple/green/gold tulle skirt, and flowered tulle headband are original to Laurie’s gear, as well as a pair of sheer golden wings not pictured on me here.

The green crochet vest is a variation on the Embla Vest, another original design from me.

The green leafy wrap necklace is a FREE pattern on my blog , the Ivy Crown.

The woolen costume dreads are dyed and felted & decorated by me.

The beautiful sage green bellydance skirt is from Magical Fashions.

Photography by Abel Benge ❤

I hope that I’ve done justice to Cobweb’s persona (faeriesona?), as well as adding my own interpretation and that Laurie, though I didn’t know her, would approve!

-MF

Going the Distance

Happy Monday! I hope everyone out there is feeling well and healthy – I am, if just a touch stir crazy. But the weather is beautiful and I’ve been blessed with a lot of opportunities to hike out in the isolated woods recently 🙂

It’s been a few weeks since my last blog post, so I thought I’d write up a little summary of what’s on my schedule right now – a couple new projects and previews, plus giveaways! I’m lucky to have already been working from home when the stay-at-home order was put in my place to mitigate the spread of Covid-19 in my state, so I have plenty in the works and more on the horizon for as long as my yarn stash holds out (even then, the emergency reserves are flush...)

So, cheers! Be sure to subscribe to my blog, and like & follow my Facebook Page for more fun crochet stuff!

Star & Moon Twirling Gown:

Another project made from the very well-appreciated Wendy Kay’s No-Sew Gypsy Skirt pattern, which I purchased from Etsy years ago and have used a LOT. I think this is my eighth skirt from that pattern.

Modeled by the lovely Sarina Newbold, this celestial piece is 100% cotton fabric donated by a friend, and I used the long-wedge version of the pattern to create a gown-length mega-skirt that adjusts from XS up to XXL at the waistband.

As you can see, it is just KILLER for twirling in. I am patiently building my sewing skills, because I have some really neat ideas for more crochet/fabric fusion clothing ❤ in the future!

Hedge Witch Hat PDF:

Sarina also modeled her new custom hat made from the free Hedge Witch Hat pattern on my blog:

Too. CUTE.

I plan to go over the pattern once more, then turn this popular design into a downloadable, ad-free PDF! I’m looking to expand my PDF offerings to include more available free patterns, for those that like to the portability and convenience – if there’s one you’d like to see, let me know 🙂

Fundraisers & Giveaways

I’ve recently began offering some of my premium, normally paid-only crochet patterns for FREE as special deals to help people stay safe & sane during this period of self-isolation (which I have begun to call Free Range Captivity). In return, I ask those who can do so to consider making a small donation to a worthy cause.

The first Free Pattern Fundraiser offered the Valkyrie Top gratis in support of The Trevor Project. The offer is ended now, thank you to everyone who supported this important service! Keep reading for the current free offering 🙂

The Valkyrie Top was also part of a recent Instagram Giveaway I participated in, hosted by the incredible Starlily Creations featuring some of my personal favorite crochet artists and heroes. Congratulations to Viv, winner of the deluxe halter top pattern pack!

My next Free Pattern Fundraiser is supporting the National Network to End Domestic Violence – use the code “ENDVIOLENCE” now through Wednesday, April 22 on the Ravelry checkout for the Mermaid Mitts and Sandals pattern and get it for FREE! And if you can, consider donating a small amount (they’ll take any amount, and you can use Paypal) to the worthy cause.

Mermaid Mitts & Sandals

Upcoming Designs

As I sometimes like to do in these rambling wrap-up posts, I have a couple sneak peeks on something that’s coming up soon! This design has been on my mind for years, though I lacked the persistence to do it until recently.

Mysterious, eh? Well, not really. It’s just crochet pineapples, that ubiquitous motif. Or is it?

I may have some tricks up my sleeve!

-MF