Scrappy Granny Shawl Pattern

Maybe it’s the changing of the leaves, or maybe it was the improvisational painting exercises I did in Fundamental 2-D class, but Tuesday I came home with the irresistible urge to take a bunch of colors of yarn and smoosh them all together.

As luck would have it, I started this granny square blanketย ย that uses a similarly chaotic approach to color around this same time last year and I had a few good sized remnants left over from it. Mixed and matched with some random solid yarns bits, I was all set to smoosh up this quick granny shawl!

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The pattern uses a simple granny blocks spaced out by lengths of chain 3’s to make it nice and drapey. The triangular pattern is easy to memorize and adjust depending on your size requirements – also it’s a superb scrap buster! And it’s free so what in tarnation are you EVEN waiting for?

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I added some slip stitch crochet cord to the ends of this beaut so you can tie it in place around your waist or neck so it doesn’t fall off your shoulders – but you can skip those if you want of course. This pattern is also available as a PDF through my Ravelry store!

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Scrappy Granny Shawl

Materials:
6.00 mm hook
Around 660 yards various #4 weight yarn (scraps are great!)
Scissors
Tapestry Needle
Cardboard or book 6″ wide – for creating tassels

MAIN BODY

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Guys, I’m really sorry about this clunky chart. I’m still in search of good chart-making software ๐Ÿ˜›

Ch. 4. Join with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Row 1: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc into the ring. Ch 1, dc into the ring.

Row 2: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 space โ€“ increase made. 3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc in the next space created by the beginning ch-4.

Row 3: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 4: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 5: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 3 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 3 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 6: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 4 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 4 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 7: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 5 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 5 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 8: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 6 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 6 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 9: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 7 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 7 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 10: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 8 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 8 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 11: Ch 4 โ€“ counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 9 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 9 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Work in pattern, always increasing at the point of the triangle, until you have worked 29 total rows โ€“ or until you run out of scraps!

BORDER ROUND

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Step 1: Attach your yarn to the corner in position to work across the flat top of the shawl. Ch 3, 2 dc in the same space. (3 dc) into the side of each double crochet or turning chain space across the top of the shawl.

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Step 2:ย When you reach the corner, 3 dc into the final space. Ch 2, then chain 50 (or however long you want your ties to be). Work a slip stitch into each chain stitch back down the length of the tie, leaving your original 2 chain stitches unworked. Ch another 2, then 3 dc in the same space as your last 3 dc block. Finish by working a sc in the middle dc stitch of the first 3 dc block on the next side of the shawl.

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Step 3: In the next ch-3 space, work (1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, ch-4 picot, 1 dc, 1 hdc, sc in the middle dc of the next 3 dc block). Repeat the pattern in the parentheses down the side of the shawl until you have worked the last space before the point of the triangle.

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Step 4: In the ch-3 space at the point of the triangle, work (2 hdc, 2 dc, 1 tr, ch-4 picot, 2 dc, 2 hdc, sc in the middle dc of the next 3 dc block).

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Step 5:ย Rpt the shell border of step 3 along the next side of the triangle until you have worked the shell repeat in the last space before your first 3 dc block of the border round. Work 3 dc in the same space as your first 3 dc block, ch 2. Ch 50 (or however much you chained for the first tie) and then slip stitch back down the tie, leaving the first 2 chain stitches unworked. Ch 2, join with a slip stitch in the first dc of step 1.

I like to add an extra row of slip stitching along the flat top of the shawl to reduce stretching!

Cut yarn and tie off โ€“ weave in all ends.

FRINGE:

Cut 4-5 strands about 12โ€ in length. Double them over and loop through a ch-4 picot on the shell border. Repeat for each shell on the side borders of the shawl.

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I’ve been lucky enough to be personally acquainted with a number of scrappy, spunky, creative, inspiring grannies – here’s to you ladies! You rock!

-MF

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Skinny Scrappy Scarf!

My lovely friends have often shown up at gatherings exclaiming “I have yarn for you!” – and this is a situation to be thoroughly enjoyed. However, I can’t always find a use for every single one of theseย yarns, among them long-forgotten cheap acrylics from granny’s attics, abandoned yarn sale yarn, and other orphaned skeins.

Some of these yarns have a lot more merit than others – and I try to use everything I can possibly use, because it is a rare occasion that I can bring myself to evict the yarn from the Sad Yarn Orphanarium.

However, I finally said goodbye to a huge bag full of old yarn that I just knew I wasn’t ever going to use (and actually most of it was stuff that I had bought :P) It’s slated to go to Goodwill, where it might be just the thing some other stitchmaster needs.

As a result, my yarn wall looks a lot less scary. This has virtually nothing to do with the following project. I’m just proud of myself.

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I cheated. I still have a lot of yarn that isn’t on that wall. BUT, at least I no longer fear an avalanche.

Okay, it’s notย totally unrelated, because while I was cleaning I rediscovered some old handspun and some other bits and pieces that would look nice together and got inspired to create a scrap-buster project!

This little skinny scarf combines beading, crocheting, and knitting to create a unique artsy accessory that’s great for using up small lengths of yarn.

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Skinny Scrappy Scarf

Materials Needed:
20 g packet of 6/0 seed beads
1 beading needle
#10 cotton crochet thread
2.10 mm steel crochet hook
12.5 mm knitting needles
An assortment of yarn scraps, preferably 15-20+ yards each

  1. First, grab your beading needle, crochet thread, and half of your packet of beads (set the other half aside). Your amount doesn’t have to be exact. String the beads on your crochet thread.
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  2. With your 2.10 hook, start chaining the crochet thread. Every 15-20 chains (again, we’re not worried about exact numbers here) grab a bead and include it in your stitch.

    Continue beading & chaining until you run out of your first half of beads and you have a nice little beaded strand ball. Cut the thread and tie it off. You can go ahead and make a second ball from the other half of your beads now, or (if you are sick of chaining like I was) you can wait until you’re ready for it later.
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  3. Using your beaded strand and two other yarns, CO 6 sts to your 12.5 mm knitting needles using three strands.
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  4. Using all three strands, knit the next row. Purl the next row. Repeat, alternating knitting and purling and tying in new yarn strands whenever you run out of one.
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  5. Once you have your scarf almost the length you’d like (for me this was about 60″), replace one of your strands with the second beaded yarn ball and continue knitting until you run out of beaded cord. Bind off and weave in all of your ends.

I like the beaded cord because it gives the ends a nice swing-y weight! These also make pretty good handmade gifts, since they don’t take a ton of time to make.

Here in the midwest it’s getting pretty nippy outside… maybe a nice free cowl pattern is more weather appropriate for you?

-MF

 

Shaman Coat Pattern

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It was a pretty long haul – and many many hours worth of stitching – to get from conception of this pattern to the premier of the pattern itself.ย Thankfully my new fall design, the Shaman Coat Tunisian crochet pattern, combines some of my favorite attributes:

a.) fairly long stretches of simple stitching so I can zone out to a Netflix binge,

b.) magical design tweaks that look fancy but are simply executed, and

c.) yarn that keeps things interesting and surprising even when you’re doing the same thing over and over again.

You can get the pattern for the Shaman Coat here in my Etsy Shop or through my Ravelry Pattern Store for 5.50 USD!

UPDATE 10/18: Thank you so much everyone for the clicks on Moogly’s HOHD Link Party!

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A warm, practical outerwear garment with a touch of magic! The Shaman Coat uses the unique structure of Tunisian crochet to create a gorgeous woven look that is eye-catching with any variegated yarn. Featuring a deep, draping hood and cropped kimono-style sleeves, the Shaman Coat includes the pattern for sizes Small, Medium, and Large.

The entire main body of the garment is worked flat and completed with only two easy seams while the hood is picked up and worked flat with decrease shaping and then closed with a partial seam at the top.

Never worked Tunisian crochet before? The Shaman Coat pattern includes a Tunisian Primer, with photo and written tutorials for every single Tunisian technique needed to complete the pattern – including basic Tunisian crocheting itself. Learn something new AND look amazing!

Recommended yarn: 11-15 skeins of Lion Brand Amazing (#4, 147 yd/50 g, 53% wool, 47% acrylic)

Finished Measurements: Small (19″ w. 33″ h.) Medium (21″ w. 33″ h.) Large (25″ w. 33″ h.)

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Size shown in photos is medium. Model – Regina Weiss (me) Photographer – Chaston Starling

Another big bonus for this pattern is the super-luscious array of colorways the pattern yarn comes in – I recommend checking out the Lion Brand webpage to see the full range. I kinda want to make one in every single color. They’re not even paying me to say that.

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Yarn colorways from left to right – Constellation (small), Arcadia (medium), Vineyard (large)

This one is dedicated to the motley group of trashpandas that I call my circle of best friends. You know who you are. โค

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-MF