Daydreamer Poncho Pattern

Merry Day of the Dead! Today’s offering is a brand new PDF crochet pattern that I had (ahem) originally scheduled to release in August. Ha ha! Life.

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No worries here though because the Daydreamer Poncho is SUPER versatile as a layering piece and looks just as stunning worn over long sleeves and outerwear as it does over tank tops and dresses!  You can get this fresh design in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Pattern Store for 5.95 USD 🙂

More details on the pattern below!

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Daydreamer Poncho

Embrace your inner hippie with this dreamy lace poncho; easy and quick to work up using worsted weight yarn and a 5.50 mm hook. The mesh construction makes this a perfect lightweight layering piece that flatters the wearer with a fitted shoulder, A-line shape, and a fluttery fringe at the hem.

Featuring textural stitches in alternating colors and gradually widening chain loop pattern inspired by crocheted dreamcatchers, you can proudly wear this handmade piece in any season. The ribbed post stitch collar is finished with a drawstring cord topped by yarn-fringe “feathers”. The instructions for the Daydreamer Poncho come complete with detailed written pattern including tons of quality color tutorial photos, numbered and referenced in the text so that all the techniques are illustrated and easy to follow!

Materials

5.50 mm (I) hook

Yarn: Lion Brand Jeans (#4 weight, 3.5 oz / 100g, 246 yd, 100% acrylic)
Color A: Vintage – 1 skein
Color B: Jumpsuit – 1 skein
Color C: Top Stitch – 1 skein
Color D:  Khaki – 1 skein
Color E: Stonewash- 1 skein
Color F: Stovepipe – 1 skein

Scissors
Tapestry Needle
6” length of cardboard, book, or tassel maker for fringe

Final Dimensions:
Collar: 18” without drawstring
Length: 22” unstretched, not including fringe

All instructions written in US terms

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You will love love love this pattern as much as I do, it’s so fun to make and has a ton of potential for scrapbusting if you don’t feel like splurging on new yarn – made with worsted weight and designed for color changes, there is endless possibilities! Of course, I’d love to try it in monochrome too…

As usual, too much inspiration, not enough time 😛  Enjoy the rest of the silly photoshoot I did for this pattern, and I hope it inspires you too!

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I just couldn’t be more grateful for all the wonderful comments and support you guys leave me here and on social media – you’re the reason I get to keep doing this! So much love ❤

If you’d like to see more Morale Fiber, check out my social media channels:

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Thank you!!
-MF

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PBT: Wrap-Up

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This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Maybe it’s just because I worked on the tutorial for this so much, but this newest pixie pocket belt may be my favorite ever. To be fair though, I do say that almost every time I make a new one of these.

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That’s because every one of them turns out to be totally unique – I start out with a pile of scrap materials, and then let it be what it becomes along the way. This one became “Maple” named of course after the tree. I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial series – I certainly did – and I’d love to see what is being made from this guide!

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This pattern tutorial series is now listed on Ravelry – hook up your projects so I can see what you made, or look through other projects for inspiration  😉

And now for more pictures and ramblings.

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I especially love these to dance in, since the fabric fringe catches movement so well!

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Fun side story – the flower headpiece I am wearing in this photo is one I made years ago, a long strand of curlicues (just like the ones talked about earlier in the tutorial series) with scrap yarn flowers that made as I was traveling across the U.S.

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Of course, the utility belt function of this project is super handy if you are the festival-going type, since these pixie belts are not only cute and go over anything, but also hold your necessaries!

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I’m pretty happy with how the faux-bustle back came out – its not something I’d ever really tried before. That’s another thing I love about these projects – pure experimentation is necessary, not just encouraged.

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I’m a little sad to be closing out the pixie belt tutorial actually, so I’ve had a thought – perhaps more pocket patterns in the future? What do you think?

As always, don’t hesitate to ask any questions or leave any comments! I love hearing from you ❤

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-MF

 

 

 

PBT: Attaching the Pockets

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

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So far we’ve covered basic shapes in the form of pockets such as circles, squares & rectangles, triangles, and cones – now it’s time to take all the pockets and attach them to the belt base using slip stitch crochet. Like the rest of this project, there is no strictly “right” way to do this, but I’ve included lots of process photos to show how I manage this part.

I prefer the look of pockets mounted directly onto the belt, with the backs up against the belt itself. I also always double-mount my pockets, using two lines of slip stitching, one at the top and one in the middle, to attach the pockets to the belt base. This is not absolutely necessary if you want to skip the second mount (the middle mount is the trickiest part of this) but it does make them really sturdy.  I have seen my festival friends put these things through the wringer with use – and they hold up!

If you need more inspiration on the ways you can assemble the belt, remember to check out my Pinterest board featuring crochet utility belts!

Attaching the Pockets to the Belt

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To begin the final stage of crochet for the pocket belt, lay out your belt base and grab all of your completed pockets. Decide how to place the pockets, arranging them along the belt base in whatever manner strikes your fancy – I like the pockets to sit near the ends, but sometimes they are all over the place. Here, because I’m featuring a bustle back, I keep them corralled near the ends so as not to cover the back of the skirt.

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The first step is to get a yarn and start slip stitching across the top of the belt base. I am using a really textured yarn for this part, just to add a little extra crazy.

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Here, I’m just slip stitching across the top of the belt until I get to a place where I’d like to put a pocket. Keep slip stitching, but now work through two layers – the top edge of the pocket (the back part only, since you don’t want to stitch the pocket closed) and the top edge of the belt base.

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This is the first attachment. Keep slip stitching until you want to place another pocket.

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Then, slip stitch across the pocket and belt simultaneously again.

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For drawstring pockets like this one, make sure you leave enough pocket unattached for it to be able to close nicely.

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Keep slip stitching and attaching pockets until you reach the opposite end of the belt.

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For the envelope-style pocket, I decide to make the slip stitch attaching underneath the top flap – so I open it up and stitch through the pocket layer and the belt layer underneath.

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At the end, I rotate and work one row of the side of the belt base, then rotate again and start to slip stitch across the middle of the belt, placing my stitches in between the double crochets that make up the middle row.

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Attaching in the middle can require some really creative maneuvering on the part of the hook-wielder. In fact, this part is more like guerilla fiber-punk yarn wrestling. So be prepared for that! 😀

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To work the second row of attaching, slip stitch until you reach a pocket. With the back of the pocket facing you, insert your hook into the stitching and back out on the other side of a single stitch, catching the post of the stitch with your hook.

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Then, insert the hook through the middle of the belt. Yarn over and draw this loop through the belt, the post of the pocket stitching, and the loop on your hook, making one slip stitch through two layers.

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Continue this process for at least part of the back of the pocket. When you’ve attached enough of the back of the pocket, keep slip stitching through just the belt layer as normal until you reach the next pocket, then work through both layers in the same manner again.

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Here you can see the back of the slip stitching of the second row on the inside of a pocket – just enough to hold them down and make sure they are extra secure.

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The pockets are now attached!

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After working the second round of attaching, I like to do one more row of slip stitching into the same stitches across the top of the belt, just for extra firmness (to reduce yarn stretching on the belt base) and to add more color and depth. Here I’ll change colors, then just work a simple line of slip stitching all the way across, right next to the first line of slip stitches (or wherever… FREEFORM!!)

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After this last finishing touch, I’m DONE with the crochet portion of the belt! Time to weave in my ends, then tackle the final step: the fabric fringe skirt. After that post, I’ll do a final reveal and wrap-up – I can’t wait to show the final product 🙂

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-MF

PBT: Pointed Pouch

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Shaping Circular Crochet

The following is a basic overview of the geometry of shaping circular crochet, which I’ll use in the next section to create this fun pixie pouch!

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In circular crochet, your increases represent building “outward” to add to the circumference of the object, while your stitches represent building “upward” to add to the diameter/radius of the circle. If you don’t increase at the same rate as you add rows of stitches, your circle will start to tighten inward because you don’t have enough circumference to allow it to keep building outward. This is used to our advantage to make fun shapes – adding rows where you don’t increase periodically will change the way your piece is shaped, and you can make fun points and spheres and all sorts of things.

On the other hand, adding too many increases per round will make your circumference too full, and your piece will start to ruffle at the edges on the same principle as making we saw making ruffles and curlicues.

Additionally, the HEIGHT of your stitch will change the required rate of increase – so if you want to start a flat circle in double crochet instead of single crochet, you can’t start with the same number as you would with sc, because you are starting with a greater height so it requires a greater circumference – I generally use 12 dc to start a flat circle, and add 12 inc every round to keep it flat. On the same principle, if I want to start a pointed conical piece in dc, starting with 6 dc is ideal because it begins with a nice taper.

Manipulated circles is how I make many of my utility belt pockets, including the one here! So, let’s get started.

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Notes: I’m using a 3.5 mm hook and some handspun yarn I’ve had forever, and doing non-continuous circular crochet, which means I’m using a chain-3 length to begin (not counting as first dc) and using slip stitch in the first dc to end each round. I have left the beginning and end instructions off the shorthand pattern because they are the same for each round.

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  1. 6 dc into the ring. Tighten ring. – 6 dc

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I want this pouch to be pretty pointy at the bottom, so I’ll add another row of dc without increasing.
2. Dc even – 6 dc

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Next, I want to start increasing as I move upward to make the pouch big enough to put things into, but at this point I have a pretty tight round of dc. If I increase at the same rate that I started (adding 6 stitches for the next round, or increasing in ea stitch) I will end up with an abrupt change in circumference.

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If you like the bulbous look, no problem, but I want to make my change smoother and more gradual, so I will be increasing at half the rate here – or adding 3 stitches for every increase round.
3. Inc on 2 – 9 dc

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To continue the gradual lengthening, I add another non-increasing round.
4. Dc even – 9 dc

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Then another 3 stitch increase round.
5. Inc on 3 – 12 dc

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Then even again.
6. Dc even – 12 dc

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Now, I’m going to prepare to fatten this puppy up. That means I’m going to do two rounds in a row that each increase by three, creating  a less gradual change in circumference – that will bring me up to 18 dc..
7. Inc on 4 – 15 dc
8. Inc on 5 – 18 dc

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…18 dc is divisible by 6, so I can now start increasing by 6 on each increase round to make a bulbous shape and a bigger part of the pouch. Since 18 divided by 6 is three, I will go back to increasing every 3 stitches to make a total of 6 stitches added to this round.

9. Inc on 3 – 24 dc.
10. Inc on 4 – 30 dc.
11. Inc on 5 – 36 dc.
12. Inc on 6 – 42 dc.
13. Dc even – 42 dc.
14. Dc even – 42 dc.
15. Dec (decrease, or dc2tog) on 6 – 36 dc
16. Ch 3 (counts as first hdc + ch 1), sk next st, *hdc in the next st, ch 1, sk next st* around.
17. 2 sc in ea sp around

 

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Cut yarn and tie off. I left a row full of chain-1 spaces at the top of the pouch so that I’d have some place to string the little drawstring through. To make the drawstring, just chain a length and tie off, then weave it through the spaces. I like to finish mine with little simple tassels to hide the yarn tails.

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I also attached a bead by using a tapestry needle and a spare length of yarn and simply sewing it onto the pouch for a little extra decoration.

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There you have the third and final pocket I will be completing for this particular belt!  In the next post of this series, I’ll be demonstrating how to finally attach these pockets to the belt base.

The drawstring pouch style pockets are super useful and can also be a great place to feature a special yarn or texture. Here are some other examples of pouches I’ve made in this style:

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“Mulberry” features a few little bells sewn on to the point and the drawstring ties

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A simple rounded pouch starts out with a flat circle for the bottom 

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The drawstring pouch for this belt uses yarn scraps and a leather cord for the tie

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Extra-fancy pouches went into making “Kelp” – A conical pouch forms the base onto which I added surface textures to create a shell shape. The rounded pouch features a common freeform technique called bullion stitch!

 

PBT: Triangles

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Today’s task is: Triangles! I don’t personally use this shape much in my belts, but I have seen others do beautiful pixie belts with triangles featured. Speaking of inspiration, have I mentioned I’ve been creating a special Pinterest subsection on my crochet board just for pixie pocket belts? I have, and you should follow me. Anyway, here’s triangles!

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Triangle shapes can be worked either in-the-round, where you crochet your rows in a circular direction and join them before starting a new row (using increases to create points), or in regular rows, where you chain and turn to work the opposite direction after every row (this method uses decreases to shape the piece if working from the base of the shape).

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The square pocket on “Hickory” uses back-and-forth rows with decreases placed at each end of every row to shape the triangle portion.

I personally prefer the in-the-round triangle for decorative applications, because it keeps the right side facing the entire time, which to me looks prettier. I have an in-depth photo-tutorial on in-the-round triangles in my Basic Bralette free crochet pattern, so I’ll not go over the entire thing here – please refer to that tutorial for more info! And of course, I’m using bits and scraps, so I’ll change colors every row or so.

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Pattern for in-the-round Triangle:

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Rnd 1: Ch 2 (does not count as first st), (3 dc into the ring, ch 2) 3 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 9 dc

Rnd 2: Ch 2, 1 dc into the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) repeat within parentheses twice. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 21 dc

Rnd 3: Ch 2, 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 7 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) rpt within parentheses twice. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 33 dc

(shorthand version from here on – just continue the established pattern until your triangle is the desired size!)

Rnd 4: 11 dc, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] in next space – rpt around

Rnd 5: 15 dc, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] in next space – rpt around

Etc.

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I want to make my triangle just big enough for one side to match the top of my rectangle pocket – see where I’m going with this?

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So, after I’m done, I’ll  slip stitch through the top row of the triangle and the top row of the rectangle simultaneously to join them – doesn’t matter if you don’t have exactly the matching amount of stitches, ‘cause its fReEfOrM baby! So fudging it is okay. Encouraged even.

Once that’s complete, I weave in all the ends. Now I have a rectangle pocket with a cute pointed flap to cover the top. Let’s get even fancier – or as the kids these days say, extra – by using that ruffle technology I talked about earlier in the series.

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With some handspun orange wool, I attach with a sl st a few stitches down the side of the pocket. Using a gradation of stitch heights and working about 2-3 stitches per every stitch worked into, I make a funky ruffle down the side of the pocket, ending in a couple chain stitches before fastening off. Let’s go nuts and slip a bead on there, too. And some extra yarn bits for tassel.

Then, begin on the other side (working in the opposite direction if you want the right side to be facing) and do the other side to match. Now we’re talking.

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Another word on inspiration here : this is why it’s fun for me to choose a theme for these pieces, which are always nature-based for me.  What made me decide to add that crazy ruffle? Well, for one thing, I had just a bit of that thick wool orange yarn, and bulky handspun makes great funky accent choice. But more than that, I was thinking about the Maple tree, and the way the brightly colored leaves curl as they slowly dry. The pockets so far had bright fall-like colors, but the lines were so straightforward – circle, square, rectangle – that I needed a bit of crazy curl in the pockets to kind of represent that thought of the curly maple leaf. I wasn’t going for an exact replica of the curly leaf, just a touch of the spirit of the leaf. Does that sound crazy? Good. Because this is some artistic pixie magic we’re doing. Save the logic for the office.

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In the next few posts we’ll be tackling circular pockets – stay tuned!

-MF

Feather & Scale Halter Top

I could not be more thrilled to be rolling out my newest design today, brought to you in part by the willingness of my lovely friends to dress up in crazy costumes in the middle of the Indiana summer heat for me 😉

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May I present, for your edification and delight,the Feather & Scale Halter Top pattern? I dreamed up this design back in January, inspired by scale mail festival and costume clothing pieces, and have been diligently plugging away on the details all summer!

The crochet pattern PDF is available for purchase in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Pattern Store for 5.95 USD (but there’s a big sale still going on right now, so you can get it for cheaper than that if you hurry before August 1st). Read more about this one-of-a-kind pattern below!

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The Feather & Scale Halter Top uses fine variegated cotton blend yarn to create an eye-catching gradient of crocodile stitch scales on the outer top, with a built-in inner cup lining for coverage and support. The cross-back ties keep the weight off of the neck so you can comfortably dance & groove that feathery fringe into motion!

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Size pictured: X-Small in Schachenmayr Tahiti

With the dramatic triangle shaping to accent the body’s curves, this halter is both figure flattering and fun to wear – and the pattern is written for FIVE sizes, X-Small – X-Large (corresponding to AA/A – DD cup sizes ).

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Size Pictured: Medium in Schachenmayr Tahiti

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Size pictured: X-Large in Red Heart It’s a Wrap Rainbow

The pattern is well stocked with all of the details on the techniques needed to create this unique piece, including extensive instructions on creating the crocodile stitch used for the main part of the halter – as well as precise step-by-step written instructions that correspond with nearly 100 tutorial photos! Additionally, I’ve begun to dig into developing some tutorial video skills with this one – be gentle, I’m still very much learning!

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Materials:
3.75 mm hk
Schachenmayr Tahiti, 2 (2, 2, 3, 3) skeins – (#1 weight, 1.75 oz / 50 g per 306 yds, 99% cotton / 1% polyester)
OR
Red Heart It’s a Wrap Rainbow, 1 (1, 1, 2, 2) skeins – (#1 weight, 5.29 oz /150 g per 623 yds, 55% acrylic 45% cotton)
Scissors
Tapestry needle
6” Length of cardboard, book, or fringe maker

Sizes & Finished Measurements:
X-Small (XS): Underbust length – 15”, Cup height – 6”, Cup Size – AA/A
Small (SM): Underbust length – 17”, Cup height – 7”, Cup Size – A/B
Medium (MD): Underbust length – 19”, Cup height – 8”, Cup Size – C
Large (LG): Underbust length – 21”, Cup height – 9”, Cup Size – D
X-Large (XL): Underbust length – 23”, Cup height – 11”, Cup Size – DD

Extra Credits!: The horns worn by my green dragon top model are from Dark Pony Art, the wire wrap necklace worn by my Rainbow XL top model is from Twisted Forrest Jewelry – please check them out and support small business art!

Models: Daisey Denson, Arika Harris, Katy Sanders ❤

You have reached the portion of the pattern post where there’s just a buttload of photos! Enjoy 🙂

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I think this one is my favorite, but it’s actually impossible to choose.

I hope you like this new design! I have done some fantasy-inspired pieces in the past, but I really cranked the staging up to 11 with this one – expect more of that in the future ❤

-MF

Plus Size Mehndi Halter Top

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Though it’s been two years since I first published the Mehndi Halter Top design, I’ve never stopped wanting to create the plus size version – like I did with the Sol Halter and the Plus Size Sol – but for some reason it just took me a while 🙂 Everything in its own time, amiright? At any rate, the pattern is finally ready and available in my Ravelry Pattern Store and my Etsy Shop for 5.50 USD!

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The Mehndi Halter Top pattern draws inspiration from the thick lotus petal motifs, linework, and dot borders in traditional henna design. Made in bright #4 weight cotton yarn, this pom-pom fringed top makes a unique addition to dance costumes, festival wear, or your next beach adventure!

The Plus Size version is designed for bigger busts, utilizing a cross-back tie for adjustability and comfort. The band size is 26” at the bottom of the halter with a height of 10″ from top of cups to bottom of the halter (not including the trim). The cross-back ties are 55″ and thread through loops at the side, taking the weight off of the back of the neck as with traditional halter tops.

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As usual, detailed instructions and stitch counts are included in the written pattern, as well was lots of detailed step-by-step photos!

Materials needed:

Hobby Lobby I Love This Cotton (#4, 3.5 oz/180 yds) – 2 skeins Color A, plus 1 coordinating color
3.50 mm hook
Stitch Marker
Scissors
Tapestry Needle

All instructions written in English and in US terminology.

I really hope you love making & wearing this one! My goal was to put it out by the end of May, and I’m squeaking it in right under the line 😉 Because I love you! 🙂

-MF