Vintage Derby Pattern

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I’ve always loved the bowler, a.k.a derby hat, and I think this cute but classy style looks great with anything! So I was inspired to create a crochet version, with a vintage-y feel and body stiff enough to maintain the classic bowler shape. The Vintage Derby pattern is the result, a pretty simple crochet pattern suitable for beginners but with some textural tweaks – this pattern uses waistcoat stitch crochet, a.k.a knit stitch, and yarn held double.

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I chose the waistcoat/knit stitch because I wanted the surface of the hat smoother than regular single crochet could do, and because I thought it added to that vintage look I was going for. It’s really a simple stitch to learn and I recommend this tutorial for learning waistcoat stitch from Crafternoon Treats.

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For the yarn held double, simply crochet as you would, but with two strands of yarn instead of one – this makes the body nice and thick, which helps hold the shape of the hat.

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If you like this cute springtime accessory as much as I did, consider giving the project page a like on Ravelry!

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Vintage Derby

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Materials:
Yarn: Deborah Norville Everyday (#4 weight, 113g / 203 yds 100% Anti-Pill Acrylic), 2 skeins in “Chinchilla”
50 yds contrasting yarn for the band
5.00 mm hook
Scissors and Tapestry needle

Gauge: 3 sts and 4 rows = 1″ in waistcoat stitch (ws)

Finished measurements: 24″ around (inner brim), 6.5″ height, 1.5″ wide brim

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Notes: Working the waistcoat stitch with double worsted yarn and a 5 hook was not easy at first! I had to consciously adjust my tension so that I was not single crocheting as tight as I normally would. If you are having trouble drawing up loops from the stitch below (through the post area) you will want to adjust your tension to be more loose.

Instructions:

With yarn held double, make a magic ring.

Rnd 1: 5 sc into the ring. Do not join – begin to work in the round, placing marker in the first stitch of every rnd. – 5 sts

Rnd 2: 2 ws in ea of the next 5 sc sts. – 10 sts

Rnd 3: *1 ws in the next st, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 15 sts

Rnd 4: *1 ws in the next 2 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 20 sts

Rnd 5: *1 ws in the next 3 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 25 sts

Rnd 6: *1 ws in the next 4 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 30 sts

Rnd 7: *1 ws in the next 5 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 35 sts

Rnd 8: *1 ws in the next 6 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 40 sts

Rnd 9: *1 ws in the next 7 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 45 sts

Rnd 10: *1 ws in the next 8 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 50 sts

Rnd 11: *1 ws in the next 9 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 55 sts

Rnd 12: *1 ws in the next 10 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 60 sts

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Rnd 13: *1 ws in the next 11 sts,  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 65 sts

Rnd 14: 1 ws in each st around. – 65 sts

Rnd 15: *1 ws in the next 12 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 70 sts

Rnd 16: Rpt Rnd 14

Rnd 17: *1 ws in the next 13 sts. 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 75 sts

Rnds 18 – 30: 1 ws in each st around – 75 sts

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Rnd 31: *1 ws in the next 14 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 80 sts

Rnd 32: *1 ws in the next 15 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 85 sts

Rnd 33: *1 ws in the next 16 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 90 sts

Rnd 34: *1 ws in the next 17 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 95 sts

Rnd 35: *1 ws in the next 18 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 100 sts

Rnd 36: *1 ws in the next 19 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 105 sts

Rnds 37 – 42: 1 ws in ea st around. – 105 sts

Slip stitch a few extra stitches at the end of the last round. Cut yarn and tie off.

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Reverse the hat and reattach the yarn, held double, on the last row  on the opposite side. Slip stitch in each stitch around on the inside of the brim – this helps neaten the brim and keep it sturdy. Cut yarn and tie off again when finished.

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Weave in all ends using the tapestry needle.

Hat Band:

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Using the 5.00 mm hook and the contrasting yarn held double, ch 75.

Rnd 1: Join chain in a ring, being careful not to twist the chain. Sc in each ch stitch around. Join with a slip stitch to the first st of the round.- 75 sts

Rnd 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first st). Ws in the first st. 1 ws in each st around. Join with a sl st. – 75 sts

Rnd 3: Repeat Rnd 2. Cut yarn, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Weave in the spare end, then thread the tapestry needle with the long end and use it to sew the band onto the hat. If you would rather not attach the band, it should stay pretty secure anyway – your call!

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It was fun dreaming up a vintagey look to match the hat – but next time I will do the photoshoot BEFORE I dig out a bunch of plants from a garden bed in the hot sun, lol!

 

This little pattern was so much fun, I was reminded of how much I love making hats! I do have a DOOZY cooked up as an idea for the future, but I haven’t put hook to yarn on that yet – stick around and see more by following my blog or following my Facebook page!

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If you like funky hats, you should check out my FREE horned monstrosity, the Krampus Hat Pattern.

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If vintage and steampunk-y is your style, maybe you’d like some Ruffled Wrister gloves to match your hat? That one’s also free!

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❤ – MF

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11 thoughts on “Vintage Derby Pattern

  1. Pingback: Vintage Derby PDF & Hat Sale! | Morale Fiber

  2. I may be 73 and much too old to wear most of your fabulous designs but I love your style and imagination when creating your projects.
    You’re such a lovely lady with a fresh look on so many different styles. I always look forward to your next creation!!

    Like

  3. Hi, i have a question. My hat doesent seem to be high enough after row 30. How high should it be after this row? Mine is 8.5cm. This is without the rows after that. I took those out because it looked weird 😅.
    Thank you

    Like

    • Hi Stephanie, unfortunately I don’t have an example hat on hand to answer this question, but Row 30 is the last row of the main body of the hat before the brim, so at that point your hat should be almost as tall as the total height of the hat, which is around 6.5-7 inches 🙂

      Like

  4. hi Regina, love your patterns. still busy with the elfcoat, large. but in the meantime I like to crochet something different.
    Ik like the Derby a lot. I have a question.. Is it possible that you’ll give the measurements after a couple of rows, since I have another wool. Its not exactly the same. so maybe I had to adjust more or less rows to come to the same size as your had.
    Is that possible???
    or do you have another suggestion?
    would like to hear from you.
    thx so much
    José

    Like

    • Hi Jose! So glad you like my designs, thanks for visiting 🙂 To figure out if your wool will work or not, you’ll need to work a swatch for the gauge given at the top of the pattern.
      “Gauge: 3 sts and 4 rows = 1″ in waistcoat stitch (ws)”

      This means you’ll need the recommended hook and the yarn you are wanting to use. Make a sampler of stitches about 20 stitches long by 20 rows wide, then measure the center of your stitching. If you have 3 stitches = 1″ in length al together and 4 rows measuring 1″ high altogether then you can make this project with the wool you have.

      If your measurement doesn’t match, you will need to use a different size hook and try again until you can get the right measurements. That way your project will come out the correct size 🙂

      Like

      • Hi Regina, thx so much for your quick reply, and I already did that, but the height is more or less the same but the width is a bit larger. its about 0,4 inches wider so I thought maybe with some rows or stitches extra / or less i will get the same at the end.
        I don’t know how I’ll get extra rows without the hat become too large. may I’ll try it out. But I thought with your experience in crocheting you’ll probably can help.

        But thank you so much for sharing all your beautiful creations. I love them so much.
        José

        Like

      • I see! 🙂 It may be possible to modify the pattern to correct for your difference in gauge, but in my experience those changes can be a little difficult to predict – I’d say just keep trying it on as you go and correcting for how big you think it needs to be! 🙂

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