Scrappy Granny Shawl Pattern

Maybe it’s the changing of the leaves, or maybe it was the improvisational painting exercises I did in Fundamental 2-D class, but Tuesday I came home with the irresistible urge to take a bunch of colors of yarn and smoosh them all together.

As luck would have it, I started this granny square blanket  that uses a similarly chaotic approach to color around this same time last year and I had a few good sized remnants left over from it. Mixed and matched with some random solid yarns bits, I was all set to smoosh up this quick granny shawl!

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The pattern uses a simple granny blocks spaced out by lengths of chain 3’s to make it nice and drapey. The triangular pattern is easy to memorize and adjust depending on your size requirements – also it’s a superb scrap buster! And it’s free so what in tarnation are you EVEN waiting for?

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I added some slip stitch crochet cord to the ends of this beaut so you can tie it in place around your waist or neck so it doesn’t fall off your shoulders – but you can skip those if you want of course. This pattern is also available as a PDF through my Ravelry store!

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Scrappy Granny Shawl

Materials:
6.00 mm hook
Around 660 yards various #4 weight yarn (scraps are great!)
Scissors
Tapestry Needle
Cardboard or book 6″ wide – for creating tassels

MAIN BODY

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Guys, I’m really sorry about this clunky chart. I’m still in search of good chart-making software 😛

Ch. 4. Join with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Row 1: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc into the ring. Ch 1, dc into the ring.

Row 2: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 space – increase made. 3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc in the next space created by the beginning ch-4.

Row 3: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 4: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 5: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 3 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 3 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 6: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 4 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 4 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 7: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 5 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 5 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 7: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 6 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 6 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 8: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 7 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 7 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 9: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 8 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 8 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 10: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 9 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 9 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Work in pattern, always increasing at the point of the triangle, until you have worked 29 total rows – or until you run out of scraps!

BORDER ROUND

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Step 1: Attach your yarn to the corner in position to work across the flat top of the shawl. Ch 3, 2 dc in the same space. (3 dc) into the side of each double crochet or turning chain space across the top of the shawl.

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Step 2: When you reach the corner, 3 dc into the final space. Ch 2, then chain 50 (or however long you want your ties to be). Work a slip stitch into each chain stitch back down the length of the tie, leaving your original 2 chain stitches unworked. Ch another 2, then 3 dc in the same space as your last 3 dc block. Finish by working a sc in the middle dc stitch of the first 3 dc block on the next side of the shawl.

grannyborder3

Step 3: In the next ch-3 space, work (1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, ch-4 picot, 1 dc, 1 hdc, sc in the middle dc of the next 3 dc block). Repeat the pattern in the parentheses down the side of the shawl until you have worked the last space before the point of the triangle.

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Step 4: In the ch-3 space at the point of the triangle, work (2 hdc, 2 dc, 1 tr, ch-4 picot, 2 dc, 2 hdc, sc in the middle dc of the next 3 dc block).

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Step 5: Rpt the shell border of step 3 along the next side of the triangle until you have worked the shell repeat in the last space before your first 3 dc block of the border round. Work 3 dc in the same space as your first 3 dc block, ch 2. Ch 50 (or however much you chained for the first tie) and then slip stitch back down the tie, leaving the first 2 chain stitches unworked. Ch 2, join with a slip stitch in the first dc of step 1.

I like to add an extra row of slip stitching along the flat top of the shawl to reduce stretching!

Cut yarn and tie off – weave in all ends.

FRINGE:

Cut 4-5 strands about 12” in length. Double them over and loop through a ch-4 picot on the shell border. Repeat for each shell on the side borders of the shawl.

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I’ve been lucky enough to be personally acquainted with a number of scrappy, spunky, creative, inspiring grannies – here’s to you ladies! You rock!

-MF

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24 thoughts on “Scrappy Granny Shawl Pattern

  1. Thanks for sharing your pattern. Lots of “scraps” left from various projects that I need to use. Think I will call mine a “memory shawl” to remind me of family and friends for whom I have made things. Laying out the colors will not be easy as I know I am not gifted in that area. I especially like the addition if the small loops to attach the fringe.

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    • Thank you for enjoying lol 🙂 My favorite part of using scraps is remembering what else I have made with them too! I mean goodness knows I can’t remember what I did with my phone but I CAN remember what I did with yarn five years ago, haha.

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  3. Hi

    Thank you for sharing this beautiful shawl. It’s a great idea to use those leftover few grams of yarn from other projects. I might well start one and have it “on the go” and add stitches from different yarns as it becomes spare. Your chart is really good btw, that and the great instructions make it really easy to understand.

    Best wishes x

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  4. Oh! This is PERFECT! I have been on the lookout for a simple, warm but not too heavy, nice and deep length, worsted-weight shawl pattern for a while now. Why did I not think of the obvious, granny squares?!

    There are so many shawls out there that I want to make *eventually*, but this? If I wanted to start this today and be finished quickly, and work out of leftovers rather than spend a dime on new yarn, and love the results–well, all I can say is, thank you so much for sharing this pattern! (And your fun, happy, colorful photos totally sell it, by the way.) I now have a new distraction competing for my time. 🙂

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  5. I am almost done with this shawl and it was easy enough for a beginning intermediate crocheter to make (I had to goof with the picots for a bit and still unsure if I’m exactly right, but it seems to work).
    I absolutely love it and can’t wait until I am done. I’ll probably gift this away and start another one immediately after I’m done to gift away…

    I am so eager to see this with the fringes, tho I’ll have to slow down a bit for the holidays. Maybe it’ll be done next week, though.

    Thanks so much for sharing this and expecting for the chart–I followed your written directions and that helped me learn how to read the chart which was easier to follow.

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  6. Pattern challenged crocheted here and
    Stuck on row 1.

    Does the following instruction mean:
    “Chain 4 plus chain 1”?

    Row 1: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc into the ring. Ch 1, dc into the ring.

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    • Hi Dinny!

      So the first part of Row 1 just means that your beginning Ch 4 stands in for a double crochet (which is equal to 3 chains) plus an additional chain stitch. So “counts as dc + ch 1” just describes the purpose of the Ch 4 and how it fits into the overall pattern. Its a bit of a quirky way to write it, but I find that it helps me visualize the overall scheme of the work better when I include it, so hopefully it is more helpful than confusing, lol!
      Short answer to your question is that you only Ch 4 in the beginning 🙂

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      • Thank you so much. Now I’m stuck on row 4! Ugh. Not gettin’ it. I can usually figure out a pattern via you tube but not this time. Do you have a drawing for this row? Sorry for the hassle. Thx Dinny.

        Ps. I’m making this for my hippie daughter for xmas- and I need to get cracking 😳

        Dinny. 512.368.1266 dinnypeterson.arbonne.com

        >

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      • I looked over row 4 and it did have a few bumps in the writing, so I fixed those:
        “Row 4: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.”

        Every row except for the border follows essentially the same pattern: Ch 4 to start, 3 dc in the same space, then work 3 dc in ea of the spaces up the side with 3 chain sts in between. When you reach the point (or peak, or increase, or whichever) you work (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the central space. Then work 3 dc, ch 3 in every space down the other side, then 3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc in the last space of the row, which will be the space created by the ch-4 of the beginning of the last round.

        If you’re still lost let me know exactly which part is giving you trouble and we’ll figure out a way to get you going again!

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