Leafy Tam Free Crochet Pattern

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Since going back to school, tams have pretty much been my best friend. They are nice and practical, keeping my hair out of my face and away from getting caught in my bag straps; I like to wad up my hair, cram one of those babies on top and leave it there for the rest of the day. I usually make a Mini Mandala Slouchy Tam, but this time I wanted to do something new – and I liked the results so much I made another and wrote this pattern to share!

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Leafy Tam

Materials:
5.50 mm hook
Accent Color  – 20 yds any #4 weight yarn
Main color – Red Heart Boutique Treasure in “Tapestry”  (#4, 3.5 oz / 150 yds) – 1 skein
Gauge: 6 sts & 3 rows = 2″ in dc

For a detailed photo-tutorial on how to work the crochet leaf motif used in this pattern, see my blog post here.

Rnd 1: * Ch 5 – last 2 ch counts as the beg ch-2 in the leaf motif. In the 3rd ch from the hook, work 4 dc, ch-2 length picot in the last dc made, 3 hdc in the same stitch. Rotate, working in the same st on the other side of the beg chain, 2 hdc. Join motif in the round with a sl st in the 2nd ch of beg ch-2. Sl st in the 2nd ch st from the motif.* Rpt * to * 4 times total. Sl st in the bottom of the first motif to join the 4 leaves in a circle. Cut yarn and tie off  –  4 leaves

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Rnd 2: With main color, join yarn with a single crochet to the picot of one of the leaves. (Ch 4, sc in the 3rd hdc. Ch 4, sc in the 2nd dc of the next leaf. Ch 4,* sc in the picot) 3 times, ending last rpt at *. Join with a sl st to the first sc of the round. – 12 ch-4 spaces

Rnd 3: Sl st in the next ch-4 space. Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 3 dc in the same ch-4 space. (4 dc in the next ch-4 space) 11 times. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 48 dc

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Rnd 4: Ch 3 – counts as first dc. Dc in ea of the next 47 dc. Sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 48 dc.

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Rnd 5: Ch 3 – counts as first dc. Dc in the next 2 sts, 2 dc in the next st. (1 Dc in ea of the next 3 sts, 2 dc in the next st) 11 times. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 60 dc.

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Rnd 6: Ch 3 – counts as first dc. Dc in the next 4 sts, 2 dc in the next st. (1 Dc in ea of the next 5 sts, 2 dc in the next st) 9 times. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 70 dc.

Rnds 7 – 10: Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 1 Dc in ea of the next 69 sts. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 70 dc.

Rnd 11: Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. Dc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 5 sts, dc2tog over the next 2 sts) 9 times. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 60 dc.

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Rnd 12: Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts. Dc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts, dc2tog over the next 2 sts) 9 times. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 50 dc.

Rnd 13: Ch 3 – counts as first dc. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. Dc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, dc2tog over the next 2 sts) 9 times. Join with a sl st to the 3rd ch of beg ch-3. – 40 dc.

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Rnds 14-16: Ch 2 – does not count as first st. Fpdc in the same st as join. Bpdc in the next st. (Fpdc in the next st, bpdc in the next st) 19 times. Join with a sl st to the first fpdc of the round.

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Remember when working the fpdc/bpdc that the dc2tog counts as ONE stitch to be worked into (as shown above)

Cut yarn and tie off. Weave in ends.

With accent color, Ch 5, make leaf motif. Ch 5 again, make 2nd leaf motif. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing. With a tapestry needle, sew these twin leaves to the brim of your new hat!

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Hope you like!

-MF

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Tribal T-shirt Fringe Choker

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Sometimes I have to burn off my excess creative energy by doing something I can finish quickly! These wild textile jewelry pieces fit the bill, especially since I’ve been trying to clean my shamefully stuffed craft storage and shredding stockpiled t-shirts is a pretty effective method for me to do that.

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This tutorial is a guide for the refashion-centric among us, and you don’t even really need to be able to crochet to make it! Only the simplest crochet stitch, the chain stitch, is necessary. It’s explained here for those who don’t know how.

There are lots of different methods for cutting t-shirt yarn, and you don’t have to cut yours the same way as shown here, but this method is featured because you can use t-shirts with lots of seams (ex: Women’s fitted t-shirts). Of course, if you want to save yourself the trouble, you could just buy some commercially produced t-shirt yarn instead!

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Materials:
1 Jersey knit cotton t-shirt, plain
9.00 mm crochet hook
Scissors

Step 1: Lay out your T-shirt and cut up the side seams  on both sides of the front and across the top. It’s okay to cut a little wonky to get extra material from the bust area below the collar, but I’ve found it’s best to keep in GENERALLY rectangle shaped.

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Step 2: Beginning with your wonky – cut side (or any side if you don’t have one) start cutting a strip about an inch in width. The goal is a thin-ish strand once you stretch the material. It can be a little more or a little less than an inch depending on the material, but be careful because if it’s too thin, it’ll break when stretched. Leave your strip attached by about an inch of uncut material.

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Step 3: Flip your t-shirt piece around and cut  about an inch to the opposite side of the uncut end. Do this 3 or 4 more times to get  a long uncut strand (for a small size) or 2-3 more times for larger t-shirts. It’s better to have more than you need than not enough, and in fact you could cut the entire piece of t-shirt material this way, but I don’t like to because cutting this way leaves tabs. Speaking of which….

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Step 4: Once you’ve got your long piece, start gently stretching your strip to curl the material to make it round and yarn-like. Use a light touch at first! Now, to deal with those tabs created by zigzagging the material. Take your scissors and round those babies off, then stretch them a little more (be careful here – rounding the corners makes the fabric thin and therefore weak to stretching). Still a little messy, but stitching will mask that.

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Step 5: Set your long strip aside – I had almost 3 yards. Now lay out your remaining rectangle of t-shirt fabric and get one inch strips straight across, shearing them completely from the main fabric so that they are individual strips. Stretch each of these strips. For a standard amount of fringe, you’ll want to have 23-26 strips, so use cut out the back piece of the t-shirt and use it for more short strips if you have to.

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If you are using commercial yarn or a continuous strip in this step, cut your strands to DOUBLE the length you want your fringe to be.

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Step 6: Grab your hook and your long strand. Leaving a tail of yarn about 10″ long, create a slipknot loop. With your hook in the loop, grab the long end of your yarn with the hook and pull it through the loop, leaving your hook in the middle of the new loop. One chain stitch made.

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Repeat until you have 25-ish chain stitches, or however long you need your chain to be to fit your neck. If you’re feeling adventurous, try using the Double Chain technique instead of the regular chain. I like to use this on the fringe chokers because it helps them lie flatter around the collarbone.

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Once you’ve completed your stitches, tie off (i.e – pull the rest of your strip out through the last loop), and leave a 10″ tail when cutting off excess yarn. If you complete your required stitches but don’t have a 10 inch tail left over, just tie it off for now. We can use a short strip to attach an adequate length of tie later.

Step 7: Finally! Fringing time! Lay out your chain. Grab some of your short t-shirt strands and double them over. You might have some that are shorter than others – aesthetically I like those to be on the outside toward the shoulders but you might not care. Anyway, double those puppies over.

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Insert your hook into the loop on the bottom of your chain or double chain, from back to front, and catch the doubled side of your strand with the hook. Pull it through so you’ve got a loop.

Now catch the loose ends of your short strand with the hook. Pull those through your loop completely. Tighten.

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Ta-Da! Now do that until you have fringed the entire choker, or at least the majority of it.

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Step 8: Attach extra ties at the end of your chain if you need to, for fastening around the neck. You could be done at this point, but I like to add a little knotwork around the top.
To add knotwork, take two adjacent pairs of fringe and separate one strand from each pair (make sure the strands are also right next to each other). Pick up both strands and tie in a simple knot. Repeat across.

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These can be used as a base for adding even wilder decorations like beads, feathers, leather strips, chains, etc… But since I’m short on time, I’ll leave those for another day!

That stylish bikini underneath the necklaces is also made from recycled materials. Check out my post, the Bindu Recycled Sweater Bikini, for more on that.

-MF

Scrappy Granny Shawl Pattern

Maybe it’s the changing of the leaves, or maybe it was the improvisational painting exercises I did in Fundamental 2-D class, but Tuesday I came home with the irresistible urge to take a bunch of colors of yarn and smoosh them all together.

As luck would have it, I started this granny square blanket  that uses a similarly chaotic approach to color around this same time last year and I had a few good sized remnants left over from it. Mixed and matched with some random solid yarns bits, I was all set to smoosh up this quick granny shawl!

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The pattern uses a simple granny blocks spaced out by lengths of chain 3’s to make it nice and drapey. The triangular pattern is easy to memorize and adjust depending on your size requirements – also it’s a superb scrap buster! And it’s free so what in tarnation are you EVEN waiting for?

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I added some slip stitch crochet cord to the ends of this beaut so you can tie it in place around your waist or neck so it doesn’t fall off your shoulders – but you can skip those if you want of course. This pattern is also available as a PDF through my Ravelry store!

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Scrappy Granny Shawl

Materials:
6.00 mm hook
Around 660 yards various #4 weight yarn (scraps are great!)
Scissors
Tapestry Needle
Cardboard or book 6″ wide – for creating tassels

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Guys, I’m really sorry about this clunky chart. I’m still in search of good chart-making software 😛

Ch. 4. Join with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Row 1: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc into the ring. Ch 1, dc into the ring.

Row 2: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 space – increase made. 3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc in the next space created by the beginning ch-4.

Row 3: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 4: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 2 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 5: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 3 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 3 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 6: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 4 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 4 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 7: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 5 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 5 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 7: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 6 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 6 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 8: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 7 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 7 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 9: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 8 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 8 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Row 10: Ch 4 – counts as first dc + ch 1. 3 dc in the first ch-1 space, ch 3. (3 dc, ch 3) in the next 9 ch-3 spaces. (3 dc, ch 3) twice in the next ch-3 sp. (3 dc, ch 3) in ea of the next 9 ch-3 sps. (3 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in the next space created by the beg ch-4.

Work in pattern, always increasing at the point of the triangle, until you have worked 29 total rows – or until you run out of scraps!

BORDER ROUND

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Step 1: Attach your yarn to the corner in position to work across the flat top of the shawl. Ch 3, 2 dc in the same space. (3 dc) into the side of each double crochet or turning chain space across the top of the shawl.

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Step 2: When you reach the corner, 3 dc into the final space. Ch 2, then chain 50 (or however long you want your ties to be). Work a slip stitch into each chain stitch back down the length of the tie, leaving your original 2 chain stitches unworked. Ch another 2, then 3 dc in the same space as your last 3 dc block. Finish by working a sc in the middle dc stitch of the first 3 dc block on the next side of the shawl.

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Step 3: In the next ch-3 space, work (1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tr, ch-4 picot, 1 dc, 1 hdc, sc in the middle dc of the next 3 dc block). Repeat the pattern in the parentheses down the side of the shawl until you have worked the last space before the point of the triangle.

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Step 4: In the ch-3 space at the point of the triangle, work (2 hdc, 2 dc, 1 tr, ch-4 picot, 2 dc, 2 hdc, sc in the middle dc of the next 3 dc block).

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Step 5: Rpt the shell border of step 3 along the next side of the triangle until you have worked the shell repeat in the last space before your first 3 dc block of the border round. Work 3 dc in the same space as your first 3 dc block, ch 2. Ch 50 (or however much you chained for the first tie) and then slip stitch back down the tie, leaving the first 2 chain stitches unworked. Ch 2, join with a slip stitch in the first dc of step 1.

I like to add an extra row of slip stitching along the flat top of the shawl to reduce stretching!

Cut yarn and tie off – weave in all ends.

FRINGE:

Cut 4-5 strands about 12” in length. Double them over and loop through a ch-4 picot on the shell border. Repeat for each shell on the side borders of the shawl.

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I’ve been lucky enough to be personally acquainted with a number of scrappy, spunky, creative, inspiring grannies – here’s to you ladies! You rock!

-MF

MF’s Costume Pattern Collection

I’m busily working away today on the upcoming new design, but I thought I’d take a break from that to do a little shameless self-promotion 😉  Halloween is only a month away, and as a fan of the fantastical I happen to have written a number of costume patterns!

Some are fancy creatures, some are fantastic characters, all of them can be completed before the ‘Eve. Here’s a list!

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  1. Sylphie Crocodile Stitch Hat: This PAID pattern includes Adult, Child, and Baby sizes for this sweet croc stitch accessory, as well as an intro to croc stitch for those who have never worked it before. Follow the optional horn instructions for a dragon hat!
  2. Tunisian Fantasy Hood: I wrote this FREE pattern for my blog, and it seems to be a continued favorite – worked in Tunisian simple stitch, it uses bulky weight roving yarn for a thick barrier against the cold, but it looks great in worsted as well!
  3. Deer Hat: This PAID pattern has a special place in my heart because it is the first pattern I ever designed & sold. Thankfully I learned a lot since then and it has gotten a makeover or two! Worked using simple single crochet and amigurumi shaping techniques for the antlers and ears. Perfect for a cute and warm creature costume!
  4. Mermaid Mitts and Sandals: This PAID pattern includes directions for both the scaly fingerless gloves and the barefoot sandal equivalent. Appropriate for naiads, dryads, and a number of other wee folk costumes.
  5. Steampunk Ruffled Wristers: FREE pattern for a ruffled pair of buttoned wrist cuffs that look awesome with a top hat and goggle combo. Uses DK weight cotton blend yarn and satiny ribbon yarn.
  6. Candy Corn Baby Hat: FREE pattern for an easy candy corn hat for infants! Keep a li’l guy warm AND comfy with the post stitch brim that adds a little elasticity to the design.

Merry Costume Making to all! I personally do not know what I will be for Halloween yet, but something always comes to me in time.

-MF

Gnome Toboggan Crochet Pattern

Historically, January has not been my favorite month – which is why I am happy to debut a new design to brighten up your midwinter blues! Because as you know by now, the crocheting will continue until morale improves.

The Gnome Toboggan is available in my Etsy Shop as well as my Ravelry Pattern Store. Don’t forget that I have a special deal going on until January 13th, just follow the link for details.

This hat is ultra squishy and stretchy, and works up quick enough to finish in one afternoon of binge-watching Xena: Warrior Princess. Not that I know anyone who has done that.

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A “knit-look” ribbed crochet beanie worked in bulky weight yarn with a soft stretchy fit and subtle gnomish point.

This ultra squishy cozy toboggan is topped with a faux fur pompom and can be made with only 1 skein of Lion Brand Scarfie yarn!

Alternate instructions for a more traditional rounded beanie top are also included, as well as a photo tutorial on how to work the front and back post double crochet.

Sizes included:
Adult Medium – 23″

Adult Large – 25″

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Above: Adult Medium, Below: Adult Large

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Trust me, you’ll never want to take this hat off!

~*Mf*~

Sweetheart Classic Beret Pattern

I have no idea what prompted me to want to make myself a beret, but I did know exactly how I wanted it to look. After casting around for a pattern and finding nothing close enough, I of course just endeavored to create the proper pattern myself. And here it is, gratis, via Ravelry!

Sweetheart Classic Beret

 

You can find this FREE pattern in PDF format here.

The Sweetheart Classic Beret is a cute, crocheted wardrobe staple – worked in any worsted weight yarn, the timeless silhouette of this accessory looks chic and fun with any outfit. The main body and brim of the hat uses only half double and single crochet stitches and is suitable for beginners. The tab at the top of the beret can be worked with the crochet I-cord technique.

Don’t know how to crochet an I-cord? Here’s a tutorial from the amazing June Gilbank! I knit mine, but crochet will work just as well.

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I love seeing what people make from my patterns, so if you get a hankering for a beret like I did, be sure to show off your project on Ravelry so I can see!

 

Yes, I know it’s raspberry. No, I didn’t do it on purpose 😉

-MF

 

Candy Corn Hat Free Crochet Pattern

October has, as per usual, incited a flurry of frantic crochet activity on my part as I try to outfit myself and my loved ones in cute and warm Halloween accessories. Actually that’s not terribly different than usual, but add in pattern development and schoolwork and you’ve got a busy month on your hands.

I’ve been working this great Knight’s Helmet pattern for Chaston – it’s free and so far the pattern has been great, I recommend it! Make sure you measure as you go, though, since she doesn’t give a gauge. Seems like that helmet would look really good with a nice medieval style hood, no?

Also, what’s cuter than dressing a baby up as candy?

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I got a request for a candy corn hat for a 6-month old, and wanted to share the pattern in case anyone else has similar ideas! This little hat is adorable and easy, 8″ long from point to brim, with a 17″ brim when fully stretched. The fpdc (front post double crochet) and bpdc (back post double crochet) give the brim some elasticity so it will not fall off of baby’s head.

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Candy Corn Baby Hat

Hook: 4.5 mm

Yarn: #4 Worsted Weight yarn in white, yellow, and orange.

Gauge: 4 sts = 1″ in double crochet

Notes: The Ch 3 and the beginning of ea round DOES NOT count as the first dc of the round. Each round is ended with a slip stitch join to the first dc of the round.

Make Magic  Ring  in WHITE

1: Ch 3 (does not count as first dc) 12 Dc into the ring, sl stitch in the first dc to join.

2: Ch 3, dc in the same stitch. 1 dc in ea dc around. Sl st in the first dc to join.

3: Ch 3, dc in the same stitch. 2 dc in the next stitch. (1 dc in next  stitch, 2 dc in next stitch) around.

4: Ch 3, dc in the same stitch and in the next st. 2 dc in the next st. (1 dc in next 2 sts, 2 dc in the next stitch) around.

5: Ch 3, dc in the same st and in ea of the next 2 sts. 2 dc in the next st. (1 dc in the next 3 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around.

Cut yarn and tie off. Switch to YELLOW

6: Ch 3, dc in the same stitch and in ea of the next 3 sts. 2 dc in the next st.(1 dc in the next 4 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around.

7: Ch 3, dc in the same st and in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 dc in the next st. (1 dc in the next 5 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around.

8: Ch 3, dc in the same st and in ea of the next 5 sts. 2 dc in the next st.  (1 dc in the next 6 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around

9: Ch 3, dc in the same st and in ea of the next 6 sts, 2 dc in the next st. (1 dc in the next 7 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around.

10: Ch 3, dc in the same st and in ea of the next 7 sts, 2 dc in the next st. ( 1 dc in the next 8 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around.

11: Ch 3, dc in the same st and in ea of the next 8 sts, 2 dc in the next st.  (1 dc in the next 9 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around.

Cut Yarn and tie off. Switch to ORANGE

12: Ch 3, dc in the same st and in ea of the next 9 sts, 2 dc in the next st.(1 dc in the next 10 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around.

13: Ch 3, dc in the same st and in ea of the next 10 sts, 2 dc in the next st. (1 dc in the next 11 sts, 2 dc in the next st) around.

14 -16: Ch 3, dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea stitch around.

17, 18 : Ch 3, 1 fpdc into the same stitch, 1 fpdc into the next st. 1 bpdc into ea of the next 2 sts. (2 fpdc, 2 bpdc) around.

Sl st around the entire brim of the hat. Weave in all ends.

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Sweet stitching!

-MF