Elf Coat Pattern

ElfCoatCover1

Hi there! I’m really happy I am bringing you the Elf Coat Tunisian crochet pattern today, as this piece has been my secret baby for over a year and a half now (twenty months or so if you count the first draft).

This design started as a variation on my Shaman Coat pattern, a Tunisian crochet pattern that uses Tunisian Simple Stitch to create a rectangular-based overcoat with a big magical hood.

I wanted to try a coat with a flouncier A-line shape. This is what I made the following summer – you can read more about that project on this blog post:

I got positive responses and requests for the pattern, but to be honest I personally was not satisfied on how it came out. So I sat and pondered and then tried again, using inspiration from a favorite sweater of mine and other projects I saw out there in the yarniverse including the coats of the inimitable Katwise.

TwentyMoons39

The new design I came up with was solid, but needed a lot of tweaking and figuring, plus many hours of stitching of course. All this was done gradually as my life changed very quickly around me. When I recently (finally) completed it, I felt triumphant… but this was just for one size. I still needed two more sizes to complete the pattern I had planned!

TwentyMoons13

Well, I got impatient. I have been working on this thing for a long time, and I wanted to hurry up and share it. So I decided to share the pattern for the first size here for FREE, along with basic schematic descriptions and tips for customizing. I plan on adding more pattern elements and the written pattern for larger sizes  in the future –  but for now, please enjoy the Small size and if you make something with it I would LOVE TO SEE IT! ❤ ❤ ❤

UPDATE: This pattern is now linked in the Ravelry Pattern database, so you can throw a gal a favorite and/or link up your projects to the Ravelry pattern page here.

TwentyMoons27

Elf Coat Tunisian Crochet Pattern

TwentyMoonsCollage1

This elegant fantasy-inspired sweater coat features an A-line silhouette with a curling, pointed geometric hem shape inspired by flower blossoms, delicate pointed bell sleeves, and of course a long and ample pointed elf hood. The variegated yarn creates dazzling prisms of color across the separately worked pieces of the coat.

TwentyMoons24

Tunisian crochet using the Tunisian Knit Stitch gives the fabric of this coat an imitation-knit texture that is sleek and beautiful as well as warm. The modular construction makes this pattern easy to customize and style, and includes tips for sizing and modification from the written pattern.

TwentyMoons7

My own vision for future versions of this pattern includes too many ideas to maybe ever actually do! I plan to add corset lacing on this for sure (this version doesn’t have it because it is already so fitted). Also faux fur hemming, like the first draft… a patchy version using yarn scraps… added pockets… an ultra-flared version using all pointed wedges, a short sleeve collared version… Just a cropped jacket version with no skirt… an ornate version with embroidery or freeform crochet… felted additions…

TwentyMoons21

You guys might have to help me out with those. 😀 Speaking of which, if you like and/or make this pattern and you have feedback for me, please leave it in the comments! Questions and suggestions are always welcome.

Elf Coat Instructions

TwentyMoonsCollage2

Materials

6.5 (K) Tunisian hook
3.50 mm regular hook
King Cole Riot DK (#3 weight, 100 g / 324 yds, 30% wool, 70% acrylic – color shown is Autumn) – 10 skeins
Gauge for Riot DK: 9 sts & 10 rows = 2” (top of ea block = 3.5”)
Red Heart Boutique Unforgettable (#4 weight, 100 g / 270 yds, 100% acrylic – color shown is Meadow) – 13 skeins
Gauge for Unforgettable: = 8 sts & 9 rows = 2”

Size:

Finished Measurements:
Waist: ~34″
Bust: ~34″
Hip: ~38″
Sleeve: 22″ (measured armpit to hem)
Length: ~35″

This pattern, based on a 9-wedge skirt, using 5 pointed wedges and 4 simple wedges , is equivalent to a Small size. Larger sizes can be based on an 11-wedge skirt (5 pointed wedges, 6 simple wedges) and a 13-wedge skirt (7 pointed, 6 simple). Further tips on custom sizing can be found in the pattern, but no written pattern is completed yet for larger sizes.

DSC_0352.JPG

DSC_0352.1.jpg

Notes on yarn, gauge, and sizing:

Yarn: I chose King Cole Riot DK yarn for this pattern because of it’s long color changes and pretty one-ply structure that makes the colors and the stitches well defined. The DK weight and 30% wool content creates a sleek and lightweight fabric that is also very warm. However, the big box hobby stores in the U.S do not carry this yarn – I get it from a UK website called LoveKnitting.com (which I highly recommend!).

So, I wanted to find a substitute yarn that is more commercially available and the closest I could find was Red Heart Unforgettable, which also looks gorgeous for this design. RH Unforgettable is 100% acrylic, which has the benefit of zero felting, and being allergy/vegan friendly. It is also a #4 weight yarn which means it will gauge differently.

DSC_0340.1

The two wedges worked in Red Heart Unforgettable

Gauge: Since the two yarns gauge differently, I have listed the gauges for each yarn individually under the materials section. These are using the 6.50 mm hook listed. If you use Unforgettable following it’s gauge, you can get a slightly bigger coat using the same stitch counts listed in the pattern. If you use Riot DK and follow that gauge, you will have the size coat pictured here and the measurements shown in the diagrams.

DSC_0435

9 stitches = 2″ in Riot DK

DSC_0436

10 rows = 2″ in Riot DK

DSC_0437

8 sts = 2″ in RH Unforgettable. It’s really more like 8.5 stitches, but we’re calling it 8 because of stretch!

DSC_0439

9 rows = 2″

 

It’s also an option to change the hook size for Unforgettable to obtain the gauge given for Riot DK, if you want to use the alternate yarn but still get the size pictured.

Techniques Used:

Chain (ch)
Tunisian Knit Stitch (TKS) – stitch used for each coat piece. Tutorial can be found on my blog here
TKS Increase (TKS inc): Increasing in Tunisian Knit Stitch – see TKS tutorial
TKS Decrease (TKS dec): Decreasing in Tunisian Knit stitch – see TKS tutorial
Linked Double Crochet (LDC): Creating a row of double crochet that are linked in the middle. Tutorial can be found on my blog here.
Slip Stitch (Sl st): Used selectively for seaming
Whip Stitch: Sewing stitch made with a tapestry needle with yarn as thread, used for seaming.

Technique Notes: Tunisian stitch is a wonderful crochet technique and I love it and highly recommend learning if you haven’t. But since this piece uses a simple stitch pattern (it’s just rows of regular stitches with some increases and decreases – that’s really it) a different technique can easily be substituted in. As long as your stitches match the gauge given, you could work this pattern in regular single crochet or regular knit stitch.

One Tunisian stitch = one regular single crochet or one regular knit/purl stitch.

I tested out some Riot DK in rows of single crochet, and obtained a closely matching gauge using a 4.0 mm hook.

Blocking: Not absolutely necessary but it does wonders for your finished piece, especially with Tunisian crochet which tends to curl. Blocking for this piece can be done simply by laying your piece out on a foam mat, using blocking pins to stretch it and make it lay flat and pretty and in the right shape. Using a spray bottle and plain water, wet the piece, then let dry. This works great with wool based yarns (King Cole Riot DK) and moderately well with acrylics (RH Unforgettable).

Okay, phew. That was a lot of info.

I tried to provide the answers to what I thought might be common questions for this pattern, based on what people have asked about similar patterns 🙂 If any of it seems confusing, please don’t hesitate to ask me here on the blog, or via my Facebook page

Now on to the pattern:

Simple Wedge (Make 4)

DSC_0360.2

 

Ch 15.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 13 sts. Return pass (RP). – 15 stitches
Row 2: TKS in ea ch st across the row. RP. – 15 sts
Rows 3-18: TKS across, RP. – 15 sts
Row 19: TKS in the next 6 sts, pick up a lp in the next space to increase. TKS in the next st, pick up a lp in the next sp to increase. TKS in the next 7 sts. RP. – 17 sts
Rows 20-35: TKS across, RP. – 17 sts
Row 36: TKS in the next 7 sts, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next st, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next 8 sts. RP. – 19 sts.
Rows 37-52: TKS across, RP. – 19 sts
Row 53: TKS in the next 8 sts, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next st, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next 9 sts. RP. – 21 sts.
Row 54-69: TKS across, RP. – 21 sts
Row 70: TKS in the next 9 sts, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next st, increase in the next sp. TKS in the next 10 sts. RP. – 23 sts.
Row 71-80: TKS across, RP. – 23 sts
Cut yarn and tie off.

Pointed Wedge (Make 5):

DSC_0360.3

Ch 15.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 13 sts. Return pass (RP). – 15 stitches
Row 2: In TKS, pick up a lp from ea st across the row. RP. – 15 sts
Rows 3-9: TKS across, RP. – 15 sts
Row 10: TKS in the next 6 sts, pick up a lp in the next space to increase. TKS in the next st, pick up a lp in the next sp to increase. TKS in the next 7 sts. RP. – 17 sts
Rows 11-18: TKS across, RP. – 17 sts
Row 19: TKS in the next 7 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 8 sts. RP. – 19 sts
Rows 20-27: TKS across, RP. – 19 sts
Row 28: TKS in the next 8 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 9 sts. RP. – 21 sts
Rows 29-32: TKS across, RP. – 21 sts
Row 33: TKS in the next 9 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 10 sts. RP. – 23 sts
Rows 34-37: TKS across, RP. – 23 sts
Row 38: TKS in the next 10 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 11 sts. RP. – 25 sts
Rows 39-42: TKS across, RP. – 25 sts
Row 43: TKS in the next 11 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 12 sts. RP. – 27 sts
Rows 44-47: TKS across, RP. – 27 sts
Row 48: TKS in the next 12 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 13 sts. RP. – 29 sts
Rows 49-50: TKS across, RP. – 29 sts
Row 51: TKS in the next 13 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 14 sts. RP. – 31 sts
Rows 52-53: TKS across, RP. – 31 sts
Row 54: TKS in the next 14 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 15 sts. RP. – 33 sts
Row 55: TKS across, RP. – 33 sts
Row 56: TKS in the next 15 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 16 sts. RP. – 35 sts
Row 57: TKS across, RP. – 35 sts
Row 58: TKS in the next 16 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 17 sts. RP. – 37 sts
Row 59: TKS across, RP. – 37 sts
Row 60: TKS in the next 17 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 18 sts. RP. – 39 sts
Row 61: TKS across, RP. – 39 sts
Row 62: TKS in the next 18 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 19 sts. RP. – 41 sts
Row 63: TKS across, RP. – 41 sts
Row 64: TKS in the next 19 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 20 sts. RP. – 43 sts
Row 65: TKS across, RP. – 43 sts
Row 66: TKS in the next 20 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 21 sts. RP. – 45 sts
Row 67: TKS in the next 21 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 22 sts. RP. – 47 sts
Row 68: TKS in the next 22 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 23 sts. RP. – 49 sts
Row 69: TKS in the next 23 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 24 sts. RP. – 51 sts
Row 70: TKS in the next 24 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 25 sts. RP. – 53 sts
Row 71: TKS in the next 25 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 26 sts. RP. – 55 sts
Row 72: TKS in the next 26 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 27 sts. RP. – 57 sts
Row 73: TKS in the next 27 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 28 sts. RP. – 59 sts
Row 74: TKS in the next 28 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 29 sts. RP. – 61 sts
Row 75: TKS in the next 29 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 30 sts. RP. – 63 sts
Row 76: TKS in the next 30 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 31 sts. RP. – 65 sts
Row 77: TKS in the next 31 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 32 sts. RP. – 67 sts
Row 78: TKS in the next 32 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 33 sts. RP. – 69 sts
Row 79: TKS in the next 33 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 34 sts. RP. – 71 sts
Row 80: TKS in the next 34 sts, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next st, inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 35 sts. RP. – 73 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

Skirt Construction

Alternating simple wedges with pointed wedges as shown, seam all blocks together with a whip stitch using a tapestry needle and a length of yarn.

DSC_0352.5

Since the rest of the pattern is based off of the measurements of the skirt waist, you could extend the skirt and figure the pattern out from there if you are adventurous. I have included notes in the rest of the pattern on modifying the pieces.

DSC_0352.3

Waist length for the size Small.

Skirt Border:

DSC_0363

The skirt border consists of 3 rows of Linked Double Crochet, worked back and forth, with increases at the point of each pointed wedge.

With 3.50 mm hook, attach yarn at one end of the skirt hem.
Row 1: Ch 3, LDC in each stitch across, inserting hook as if to TKS. 3 LDC at the point of each pointed wedge, mark the middle stitch of this increase.
Row 2: Ch 3, turn. LDC in ea st across working (2 LDC, ch 1, 2 LDC) at each point where the increase was marked.
Row 3: Ch 3, turn. LDC in ea st across working (2 LDC, ch 1, 2 LDC) in each ch-1 from the increase points of the previous row.

Once third row is completed, cut yarn and tie off. You can work extra border here if you want the skirt longer!

DSC_0364

Close-up of the increases at the point of each pointed wedge

 

WAIST:

The waist is worked directly onto the top of the wedges that make up the skirt. One stitch is skipped on every block, to create a slight decrease in width to accentuate the waist.

DSC_0362.JPG

DSC_0361.1

Row 1: RS facing, attach yarn at end of the tops of the seamed wedges by pulling up a loop using TKS. With 6.50 mm Tunisian hook, pick up a loop using TKS from ea of the next 13 sts. Sk next st and seam. (Pick up a loop from ea of the next 14 sts, sk next st and seam) 8 times – or however many you need to complete the row across every wedge block. RP. – 126 sts
Rows 2 – 17: TKS in ea st across. RP. To modify the size here, add or subtract any rows  after the first one to make it longer or shorter.

Back Panel:

The back panel is worked the length of stitches that equals half of the number of stitches in the waist. In this size, the waist is 126 stitches. Divided by two, that’s 63 stitches.

DSC_0371.1

With 6.50 mm Tunisian Hook, Ch 63.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 61 sts. Return pass (RP). – 63 stitches
Row 2: In TKS, pick up a lp from ea st across the row. RP. – 63 sts
Rows 3 – 26 : Rpt Row 2.
Row 27: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 55 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 61 sts
Row 28: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 53 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 59 sts
Row 29: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 51 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 57 sts
Row 30: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 49 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 55 sts
Row 31: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 47 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 53 sts
Row 32: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 45 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 51 sts
Row 33: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 43 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 49 sts
Row 34: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 41 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 47 sts
Row 35: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 39 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 45 sts
Row 36: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 37 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 43 sts
Row 37: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 35 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. Tks in the next 2 sts. RP. – 41 sts
Row 38: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 33 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP. – 39 sts
Row 39: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 31 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP. – 37 sts
Row 40: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 29 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP. – 35 sts
Row 41: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 27 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP – 33 sts
Row 42: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 25 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 2 sts. RP – 31 sts
Row 43: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 23 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. RP – 29 sts
Row 44: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 21 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. RP – 27 sts
Row 45: TKS in the next st, TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next 19 sts. TKS dec in the next 2 sts. RP – 25 sts

If working a different size, keep working in the pattern with decreases at both ends (or as necessary) until the remaining number of stitches is 25.

Cut yarn and tie off.
Front Panel – Right:

The front panels are worked with the length of stitches equaling the half of the waistband that the back panel won’t be taking up. There’s two, so each panel will be a quarter of the total waistband stitches. 126 / 4 = 31.5. Since that’s not a whole number, I will round down to 31 and fudge the seam a tiny fraction.

DSC_0352.2

With 6.50 mm Tunisian Hook, Ch 31.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 30 sts. Return pass (RP). – 31 stitches
Row 2: TKS in ea st across the row. RP. – 31 sts
Rows 3 – 26 : Rpt Row 2.
Row 27: TKS in ea of the next 28 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 30 sts.
Row 28: TKS in ea of the next 27 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 29 sts.
Row 29: TKS in ea of the next 26 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 28 sts.
Row 30: TKS in ea of the next 25 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 27 sts.
Row 31: TKS in ea of the next 24 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 26 sts.
Row 32: TKS in ea of the next 23 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 25 sts.
Row 33: TKS in ea of the next 22 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 24 sts.
Row 34: TKS in ea of the next 21 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 23 sts.
Row 35: TKS in ea of the next 20 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 22 sts.
Row 36: TKS in ea of the next 19 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 21 sts.
Row 37: TKS in ea of the next 18 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 20 sts.
Row 38: TKS in ea of the next 17 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP – 19 sts.
Row 39: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 13 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 17 sts
Row 40: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 11 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 15 sts
Row 41: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 9 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 13 sts
Row 42: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 7 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 11 sts
Row 43: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 5 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 9 sts
Row 44: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 7 sts
Row 45: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the next st. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 5 sts

If working a different size, keep working in the pattern with decreases at both ends (or as necessary) until the remaining number of stitches is 5.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Front Panel – Left:

With 6.50 mm Tunisian Hook, Ch 31.
Row 1: Pick up a st in the 2nd ch from the hook and in the next 30 sts. Return pass (RP). – 31 stitches
Row 2: TKS in ea st across the row. RP. – 31 sts
Rows 3 – 26 : Rpt Row 2.
Row 27: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 28 sts. RP – 30 sts.
Row 28: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 27 sts. RP – 29 sts.
Row 29: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 26 sts. RP – 28 sts.
Row 30: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 25 sts. RP – 27 sts.
Row 31: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 24 sts. RP – 26 sts.
Row 32: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 23 sts. RP – 25 sts.
Row 33: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 22 sts. RP – 24 sts.
Row 34: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 21 sts. RP – 23 sts.
Row 35: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 20 sts. RP – 22 sts.
Row 36: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 19 sts. RP – 21 sts.
Row 37: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 18 sts. RP – 20 sts.
Row 38: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 17 sts. RP – 19 sts.
Row 39: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 13 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 17 sts
Row 40: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in ea of the next 11 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 15 sts
Row 41: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 9 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 13 sts
Row 42: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 7 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 11 sts
Row 43: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 5 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 9 sts
Row 43: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 7 sts
Row 44: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next st. Dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 5 sts

If working a different size, keep working in the pattern with decreases at both ends (or as necessary) until the remaining number of stitches is 5.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Seam the Back & Front Panels

Using a tapestry needle and a length of yarn, whip stitch the sides of the panels together so that the long angles face each other. Stitch together the straight sides, not the angles. Once the bodice is sewn together, line the flat bottom up with the waist of the skirt and attach using a 3.50 mm crochet hook and a ball of yarn by working a slip stitch through both pieces.

DSC_0361

SLEEVE (Make 2):

If working a different size, the number of rows worked with increases in the start of the sleeve should equal the number of rows it will be seamed onto (across the angle created by the decreases in the front and back panels), plus 4 (sleeve is also seamed onto the top 4 stitches across the panels).

DSC_0385.JPG

DSC_0348.1

Ch 16.
Row 1: Pick up a lp in the 2nd ch from the hk and in ea of the next 14 ch sts. RP. – 16 sts
Row 2: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 12 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 18 sts
Row 3: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 14 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 20 sts
Row 4: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 16 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 22 sts
Row 5: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 18 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 24 sts
Row 6: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 20 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 26 sts
Row 7: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 22 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 28 sts
Row 8: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 24 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 30 sts
Row 9: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 26 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 32 sts
Row 10: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 28 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 34 sts
Row 11: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 30 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 36 sts
Row 12: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 32 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 38 sts
Row 13: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 34 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 40 sts
Row 14: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 36 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 42 sts
Row 15: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 38 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 44 sts
Row 16: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 40 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 46 sts
Row 17: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 42 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 48 sts
Row 18: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 44 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 50 sts
Row 19: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 46 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 52 sts
Row 20: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 48 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 54 sts
Row 21: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 50 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 56 sts
Row 22: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 52 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 58 sts
Row 23: TKS in the next st, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 54 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final 2 sts. RP. – 60 sts
Row 24: TKS in ea st across. Rp. – 60 sts
Row 25: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 60 sts
Row 26: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 54 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 58 sts
Row 27: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in ea of the next 52 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 56 sts.
Row 28: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 50 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 54 sts
Row 29: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in ea of the next 48 sts. TKs dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in the final st. RP. – 52 sts.
Row 30: TKs dec over the next 2 sts. TKs in ea of the next 46 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 50 sts.
Row 31: TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in ea of the next 44 sts. TKS dec over the next 2 sts. TKS in the final st. RP. – 48 sts.
Rows 32 – 72: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 48 sts
Row 73: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 42 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 50 sts
Row 74: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 50 sts
Row 75: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 44 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 52 sts
Row 76: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 52 sts
Row 77: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 46 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 54 sts
Row 78: Row 74: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 54 sts
Row 79: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 48 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 56 sts
Row 80: Row 74: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 56 sts
Row 81: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 50 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 58 sts
Row 82: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 58 sts
Row 83: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 52 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 60 sts
Row 84: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 60 sts
Row 85: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 54 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 62 sts
Row 86: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 62 sts
Row 87: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 56 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 64 sts
Row 88: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 64 sts
Row 89: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 58 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 66 sts
Row 90: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 66 sts
Row 91: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 60 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 68 sts
Row 92: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 68 sts
Row 93: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 62 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 70 sts
Row 94: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 70 sts
Row 95: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 64 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 72 sts
Row 96: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 72 sts
Row 97: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 66 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 74 sts
Row 98: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 74 sts
Row 99: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 68 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 76 sts
Row 100: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 76 sts
Row 101: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 70 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 78 sts
Row 102: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 78 sts
Row 103: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 72 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 80 sts
Row 104: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 80 sts
Row 105: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 74 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 82 sts
Row 106: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 82 sts
Row 107: TKS in the next 2 sts, TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 76 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. RP. – 84 sts
Row 108: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 84 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

Seaming the Sleeve:

Fold the sleeve in half down the length of the piece. Seam together using a whip stitch, starting at the flare of the sleeve and moving toward the shoulder. At the underarm of the sleeve, match the remaining opening to the front and back panel sides, using the top 4 rows to cap the tops of the panels, overlapping the top by 4 stitches.

DSC_0394.1

Seam the sleeve using a whip stitch around the front and back panels.

DSC_0398

Close-up of the sleeve fitting.

 

Sleeve Border

DSC_0401

With 3.50 mm hook, attach yarn at the seam where the sleeve is sewn together.
Row 1: Ch 3 (does not count as first st), LDC 3 times in the same stitch, inserting hook as if to TKS. LDC in ea stitch around the sleeve. Join with a slip stitch in the top of the first dc.
Row 2: Ch 3 (does not count) LDC in the first stitch and 3 times in the next st. LDC in ea stitch around. Join with a slip stitch.
Row 3: Ch 3 (does not count), LDC in ea of the next 2 stitches. LDC 3 times in the next st. LDC in ea stitch around. Join with a slip stitch.

Cut yarn and tie off. You can make the sleeves longer here by adding extra border rounds of LDC.

DSC_0402

Close-up of sleeve border. Beware my join is not in the same place pictured as is written in the pattern – whoops!

HOOD:

The hood is worked as a separate piece consisting of one large triangle, folded in half when complete. To lengthen or shorten the hood, add or subtract rows of TKS in between the rows that increase.

DSC_0405.1.jpg

Ch 3.
Row 1: Draw up a loop from the back of each of the next 2 chain stitches. RP. – 3 sts
Row 2: TKS inc in the first space. TKS in the next st. TKS inc in the next space. TKS in the final st. RP. – 5 sts
Rows 3-4: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 5 sts
Row 5: TKS inc in the first space. TKS in the next 3 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 7 sts
Rows 6-7: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 7 sts
Row 8: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 5 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 9 sts.
Rows 9-10: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 9 sts
Row 11: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 7 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 11 sts
Row 12-13: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 11 sts
Row 14: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 9 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 13 sts
Rows 15-16: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 13 sts
Row 17: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 11 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 15 sts
Rows 18-19: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 15 sts
Row 20: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 13 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 17 sts
Row 21-22: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 17 sts
Row 23: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 15 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 19 sts
Rows 24-25: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 19 sts
Row 26: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 17 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 21 sts
Rows 27-28: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 21 sts
Row 29: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 19 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 23 sts
Rows 30-31: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 23 sts
Row 32: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 21 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 25 sts
Rows 33-34: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 25 sts
Row 35: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 23 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 27 sts
Rows 36-37: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 27 sts
Row 38: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 25 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 29 sts
Rows 39-40: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 29 sts
Row 41: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 27 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 31 sts
Rows 42-43: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 31 sts
Row 44: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 29 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 33 sts
Row 45-46: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 33 sts
Row 47: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 31 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 35 sts.
Rows 48-49: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 35 sts
Row 50: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 33 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 37 sts.
Rows 51-52: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 37 sts
Row 53: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 35 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 39 sts
Rows 54-55: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 39 sts
Row 56: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 37 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 41 sts
Rows 57-58: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 41 sts
Row 59: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 39 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 43 sts
Rows 60-61: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 43 sts
Row 62: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 41 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 45 sts
Rows 63-64: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 45 sts
Row 65: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 43 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 47 sts
Rows 66-67: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 47 sts
Row 68: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 45 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 49 sts
Rows 69-70: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 49 sts
Row 71: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 47 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 51 sts
Rows 72-73: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 51 sts
Row 74: TKS inc in the first sp. TKS in the next 49 sts. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 53 sts
Rows 75-76: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 53 sts.
Row 77: TKS in in the first sp. TKS in ea of the next 12 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 13 sts) 3 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 58 sts
Rows 78-79: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 58 sts
Row 80: TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 14 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 14 sts) 3 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the final st. RP. – 63 sts.
Rows 81-82: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 63 sts
Row 83: TKS inc in the next sp. (TKS in ea of the next 15 sts. TKS inc in the next sp) 4 times. TKS in ea of the next 2 sts. RP. – 68 sts
Rows 84-85: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 68 sts
Row 86: TKS in the next st. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 16 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 2 sts. RP. – 73 sts
Rows 87-88: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 73 sts
Row 89: TKS in the next st. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 17 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 3 sts. RP. – 78 sts.
Rows 90-91: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 78 sts
Row 92: TKS in ea of the next 2 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 18 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in the next 3 sts. RP. – 83 sts
Rows 93-94: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 83 sts
Row 95: TKS in ea of the next 2 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 19 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 4 sts. RP. – 88 sts
Rows 96-97: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 88 sts
Row 98: TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 20 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 4 sts. RP. – 93 sts
Rows 99-100: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 93 sts
Row 101: TKS in ea of the next 3 sts. (TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 20 sts) 4 times. TKS inc in the next sp. TKS in ea of the next 5 sts. RP. – 98 sts
Rows 102-103: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 98 sts
Rows 104-121: TKS in ea st across. RP. – 98 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

Seaming the Hood

Fold the large triangle down the center length so that the right sides of the fabric are facing each other and the wrong sides are out. With a tapestry needle and a length of yarn, make a whip stitch seam starting at the point of the hood and seaming over the next 89 rows toward the opening of the hood.

Once this seam is complete, there should be 32 rows left un-seamed on either side.Turn your hood inside out so that the right sides are facing out again.

DSC_0406.1.jpg

How did I get the number of rows to leave unseamed? It’s (8+8) to account for the small angled part on each side of the front panel, plus (16+16) to cover the tops of the sleeves, then (25-8= 17) to cover the portion of the top of the back panel not already covered by the cap of the sleeves. This equals 65, but I rounded down to 64 to get an even number when I halved it – so 32 rows left unseamed on either side of the hood.

The hood then is seamed to the collar of the garment (once all sleeves and everything have been seamed) using a tapestry needle and a length of yarn. Whip stitch the hood, matching the points of the hood opening indicated by the red dots to the beginning of the collar on the front, also indicated by red dots.

DSC_0411.1.jpg

Seam the hood around the collar opening, matching stitch for stitch.

Front Border and Closures

We’re almost done! Next up is to use four rows of LDC to add a border across the entire front opening, beginning with the hem, working up the opening of the garment, going around the edge of the hood, and working back down the other side of the front opening. After the third row, we’ll stop and mark the placement of the buttons.

DSC_0416.1

Using a 3.50 mm hook, join yarn in the side of the skirt border rows.

Ch 3.
Row 1: 2 LDC in the side of each LDC from the border rows (6 LDC if you did 3 border rows.) 1 LDC in the side of each row across the next wedge, waist band, and front panel. 1 LDC in ea st across the brim of the hood. 1 LDC in the side of each row across the front panel, waist band, and the next wedge. 2 LDC in the side of each LDC of the skirt border.
Row 2: Ch 3, turn. 1 LDC in ea LDC of Row 1.
Row 3: Ch 3, turn. 1 LDC in ea LDC of Row 2.

DSC_0421.1.jpg

Close-up of LDC border

Now stop and mark where your buttons will be on one side, and mark an equidistant space on the other side of the border for where you will place your loops or buttonholes. I began with one button/closure on the top and bottom edge of the waist band, then used this measurement (17 sts between each placement) to space the other buttons. I made five button placements total.

DSC_0420.1

Once your button placements have been marked, begin the fourth row of LDC.

Row 4: Ch 3, turn. 1 LDC in ea st across until you reach a button/closure marker. If you are on the button side, keep working LDC’s. If you are on the closure side, there are two options: You can chain a couple stitches and skip over working a couple stitches, which creates a buttonhole within the band and a tighter closure. I opted to use a loop closure, which leaves the front a little more open when buttoned.

If using a loop closure, chain a loop just big enough to fit the button through, then slip stitch in the same stitch. Continue working LDC’s across the band, stopping to work a chain loop at any point where a closure is marked.

Cut yarn and tie off.

DSC_0424.1

DSC_0428.1

Stopping to chain a loop closure

DSC_0431.1

After finishing the final border row, use a tapestry needle and a length of yarn to attach each button at the marked location on the opposite side of the closures.

After you have completed this, you are finished with the Elf Coat! At least, until I add more bells and whistles (figuratively… I think). Weave in your ends and block your work (blocking is highly recommended for this garment).

As I mentioned, I’ll be adding more sizes and features to this pattern as I go. I hope you are inspired to create a work of wearable art all your own ❤ The best part of designing patterns and sharing them online is that I get to help create artwork with people all around the world. Thank you, thank you, thank you for visiting and creating art with me!

-MF

TwentyMoons37

TwentyMoons11

TwentyMoons23TwentyMoons14

TwentyMoons29TwentyMoons32TwentyMoons31TwentyMoons30

 

 

Tunisian Knit Stitch Tutorial

A few days ago I released the Tunisian Simple Stitch Tutorial, mostly from material I had already compiled for my Shaman Coat pattern, which utilizes that stitch. Well, that post was a pre-game for what I have to offer today, which is the Tunisian Knit Stitch Tutorial.

Tunisian (also called Afghan) crochet is a method that uses a long hook to keep multiple stitch loops on the hook before working them back off to complete them. There are many different Tunisian stitches – here is how to work the Tunisian Knit Stitch (TKS) which makes a fabric that looks very much like knitting. This tutorial covers the basics of working TKS, as well as working increases and decreases in this stitch.

The sudden outburst of Tunisian tutelage is inspired by an upcoming design of mine featuring Tunisian knit stitch, but also by the fact that I just really love Tunisian crochet, and I hope to encourage others to love it too. I promise it’s worth it!

Tunisian Knit Stitch Tutorial

The Hold:

tunisianhold

Working Tunisian crochet may require a different hold than regular crochet – here’s an example of how I hold mine. The hand holding my live yarn remains the same, while my Tunisian hook is grasped almost like a knife, with the index finger controlling the loops on the hook. This is just how I do it – do what is comfortable and works for you!

In addition, Tunisian crochet requires a Tunisian (also sometimes called Afghan) hook, which is an specialty hook that is extra long with a stopper on the end.

Starting, Forward Pass, and Return Pass (RP)

To begin a Tunisian piece, chain the number of sts the pattern requires. This is your foundation for the following rows.

dsc_0442

To begin the first row, insert your hook into the single loop on the underside of the 2nd ch from the hook. Yarn over (YO) and draw up a loop.  Notice that before you do this, you already have one loop on your hook. This first loop counts as the first stitch and so you do not work into the first chain from the hook, but the second.

dsc_0443

Continue to draw up a loop from the back of ea ch stitch until you reach the end of the row. The action of drawing up a loop from each stitch in a Tunisian row is referred to as the Forward Pass, and counts as half of a row. (A single Tunisian row is composed of a Forward Pass and a Return Pass).

dsc_0444

Now that you’ve got all your loops on the hook, it’s time to work them back off with the Return Pass.

YO and draw through ONE loop. Every Return Pass in TKS crochet begins this way. Don’t forget it! All the other loops are worked off in two’s.

dsc_0445

YO and draw through TWO loops. Repeat yarning over and drawing through TWO loops until you reach the end of the row.

dsc_0446

At the end of the Return Pass, you will have one loop left on your hook. This loop counts as the first loop on the hook for the Forward Pass of the NEXT row.

dsc_0447

The instructions for the first row in Tunisian knit stitch is the same for the first row in Tunisian simple stitch, because you need one row of TSS to set up for the following rounds of knit stitch.

To begin the row of TKS, insert the hk through the center of the next stitch – between the two sides of the loop from the row below, and under the chain made by the return pass. Emerge the hook on the back side of the work.

dsc_0448

dsc_0449.1

dsc_0451

Yarn over and draw up a loop. Repeat across the row.

dsc_0452

dsc_0454The stitches should look like knit stitches, hence the name.

The return pass is worked the same as with TSS. To begin the return pass, YO and draw through ONE loop.

dsc_0455

YO and draw through TWO loops. Repeat across the row.

dsc_0456

Increasing:

Increasing in TKS is done ONLY on the forward pass, with the return pass worked in the same manner as usual, but with one more stitch to work off the hook.

To increase, insert your hook in the space between two stitches (with the hook entering through the front and emerging at the back) and draw up a loop. This counts as one increase and the loop is kept on the hook the same as the rest of the stitches and worked back off in the same way.

dsc_0458 (2)

dsc_0458.1

 

 

dsc_0459 (2)

dsc_0460.1

Here’s the completed forward pass with the increase stitch highlighted.

Decreasing:

Like increases, decreases in TKS are worked in the forward pass only.

To decrease, insert your hook through the middle of two adjacent stitches, with the hook emerging at the back as normal. YO and draw up a single loop. This counts as a single decrease and the loop is kept on the hook the same as the other sts.

dsc_0461 (2)

The two stitches being worked through at once are highlighted here:

dsc_0461.1

Work the rest of the row onto the hook.

dsc_0462 (2)

Below is the completed forward pass, with the decrease stitch highlighted.

dsc_0462.1

Work the return pass as normal.

dsc_0463 (2)

You might notice that your little Tunisian swatch or piece wants to curl – this is normal for Tunisian and can be overcome with blocking.

I hope this tutorial has been helpful and that you are inspired to try Tunisian crochet! As I mentioned, it’s one of my favorite techniques. The fabric made by Tunisian crochet is warm, more tightly woven than regular crochet, and has a lovely texture. Also, TKS mimics knit stitches more convincingly than any other crochet stitch I know of.

I currently only have one pattern – the Tunisian ripple scarf – available in this stitch, but it’s a FREE one and there’s some video of me using TKS too. If you’d like more patterns, slam that follow button on my blog my friend! I have more coming.

tkscarf1

Thanks for visiting 🙂

-MF

 

 

Tunisian Simple Stitch Tutorial

Today I’m bringing to the blog a tutorial for the style of crochet known as Tunisian (also called Afghan) crochet, a method that uses a long hook to keep multiple stitch loops on the hook before working them back off to complete them. There are many different Tunisian stitches, but one of the most basic is the Tunisian Simple Stitch (TSS). The following is a guide to creating this stitch, as well as making increases and decreases in TSS.

TSS10.jpg

This tutorial is based on my Tunisian Primer, a guide included as part of my Shaman Coat crochet pattern which utilizes Tunisian Simple Stitch! Tunisian might seem kind of daunting if you’ve never tried it, but it is one of my all-time favorite crochet styles and I really encourage you to try it if you never have 🙂

Tunisian Simple Stitch Tutorial:

The hold:

TunisianHold.jpg

Working Tunisian crochet may require a different hold than regular crochet – here’s an example of how I hold mine. The hand holding my live yarn remains the same, while my Tunisian hook is grasped almost like a knife, with the index finger controlling the loops on the hook.

In addition, Tunisian crochet requires a Tunisian (also sometimes called Afghan) hook, which is an specialty hook that is extra long with a stopper on the end.

Starting, Forward Pass, and Return Pass (RP)

To begin a Tunisian piece, chain the number of sts the pattern requires. This is your foundation for the following rows.

TSS1.jpg

To begin the first row, insert your hook into the single loop on the underside of the 2nd ch from the hook. Yarn over (YO) and draw up a loop.  Notice that before you do this, you already have one loop on your hook. This first loop counts as the first stitch and so you do not work into the first chain from the hook, but the second.

TSS2.jpg

Continue to draw up a loop from the back of ea ch stitch until you reach the end of the row. The action of drawing up a loop from each stitch in a Tunisian row is referred to as the Forward Pass, and counts as half of a row. (A single Tunisian row is composed of a Forward Pass and a Return Pass).

TSS3.jpg

Now that you’ve got all your loops on the hook, it’s time to work them back off with the Return Pass.

YO and draw through ONE loop. Every Return Pass in TSS crochet begins this way. Don’t forget it!

TSS4.jpg

YO and draw through TWO loops. Repeat yarning over and drawing through TWO loops until you reach the end of the row.

TSS5.jpg

TSS6.jpg

At the end of the Return Pass, you will have one loop left on your hook. This loop counts as the first loop on the hook for the Forward Pass of the NEXT row.

To begin the next row, insert your hook under the second vertical bar on the previous row. You will NOT be inserting it into the very first vertical bar (the one on the edge) because you already have your first loop on the hook leftover from the last row, right? Right.

Your hook should enter under the stitch from the front and emerge from the front, as shown in the picture.

TSS7.jpg

YO and draw the loop through the bar. In the Shaman Coat pattern this is referred to as “picking up a lp” and a single vertical bar represents one Tunisian simple stitch.

TSS8.jpg

Repeat across the rest of the row, picking up one loop from each stitch.

TSS9.jpg

YO and draw through ONE loop. (YO and draw through TWO loops) rpt across the entire row. In the Shaman Coat pattern, the instructions for the entire return pass read “Work all sts off the hook” since the return pass is the worked the same way for every row.

Note: Tunisian crochet has a right side and a wrong side – the right side with the vertical bars will be facing you while you work TSS – tunisian pieces are not turned while working like regular crochet. 

TSS10.jpg

Two completed rows of TSS

Increasing:

Increasing in TSS is done ONLY on the forward pass, with the return pass worked in the same manner as usual, but with one more stitch to work off the hook.

To increase, insert your hook in the space between two vertical bars (with the hook entering through the front and emerging at the back) and draw up a loop. This counts as one increase and the loop is kept on the hook the same as the rest of the stitches and worked back off in the same manner.

TunInc1.jpg
The picture above shows the increase highlighted after the forward pass is completed.

Decreasing:

Like increases, decreases in TSS are worked on the forward pass only.

To decrease, insert your hook under TWO adjacent sts (the vertical bars) at once. YO and draw up a single loop. This counts as a single decrease and the loop is kept on the hook the same as the other sts and worked back off in the same manner on the return pass.

You might notice that your little Tunisian swatch or piece wants to curl – this is totally normal for this type of stitch and can be overcome with blocking.

TunDec1.jpg

The picture above shows the decreased sts highlighted after the forward pass is completed. You can decrease across more than two stitch at once – for instance, the Shaman Coat hood uses a double decrease that inserts the hook through three stitches at once and draws up one loop.

I hope this tutorial has been helpful and that you are inspired to try Tunisian crochet! As I mentioned, it’s one of my favorite techniques. The fabric made by Tunisian crochet is warm, more tightly woven than regular crochet, and has a lovely texture. TSS in particular creates a really pretty woven texture on the surface of the fabric. Here are some things I’ve created with Tunisian Simple Stitch:

 

The Shaman Coat

Crochet Washcloth 1

The Best Crochet Washcloth

Mabh7.jpg

The Trickster Hood

Interested in more Tunisian crochet? Check out the FREE scarf pattern I created using Tunisian Knit Stitch, another basic Tunisian style.

Thanks for visiting, more to come!

-MF

 

PBT: Wrap-Up

PBTCover

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Maybe it’s just because I worked on the tutorial for this so much, but this newest pixie pocket belt may be my favorite ever. To be fair though, I do say that almost every time I make a new one of these.

PBTCollage1

 

That’s because every one of them turns out to be totally unique – I start out with a pile of scrap materials, and then let it be what it becomes along the way. This one became “Maple” named of course after the tree. I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial series – I certainly did – and I’d love to see what is being made from this guide!

Maple10

 

This pattern tutorial series is now listed on Ravelry – hook up your projects so I can see what you made, or look through other projects for inspiration  😉

And now for more pictures and ramblings.

Maple3Maple5Maple6

I especially love these to dance in, since the fabric fringe catches movement so well!

Maple8

Fun side story – the flower headpiece I am wearing in this photo is one I made years ago, a long strand of curlicues (just like the ones talked about earlier in the tutorial series) with scrap yarn flowers that made as I was traveling across the U.S.

Maple9

Of course, the utility belt function of this project is super handy if you are the festival-going type, since these pixie belts are not only cute and go over anything, but also hold your necessaries!

Maple7

I’m pretty happy with how the faux-bustle back came out – its not something I’d ever really tried before. That’s another thing I love about these projects – pure experimentation is necessary, not just encouraged.

Maple15

I’m a little sad to be closing out the pixie belt tutorial actually, so I’ve had a thought – perhaps more pocket patterns in the future? What do you think?

As always, don’t hesitate to ask any questions or leave any comments! I love hearing from you ❤

Maple13

-MF

 

 

 

PBT: Fabric Fringe Skirt

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

DSC_1650

Okay, we’re all done with the crochet process now, so it’s time to move on to one of the most *satisfying* portions of the process: the ragtag fabric scrap fringe skirt! Why is it so satisfying? Well, because you get to rip stuff up. Rip rip rip.

DSC_1625

Here I have the fabrics I selected during the process of selecting my materials – a couple of thrift store silk shirts and some soft rayon jersey knit that formed the lining of one of the shirts. I use my scissors to separate large chunks of fabric away from the bulky seams, then once I have a piece isolated, I start ripping!

DSC_1626

Using my fabric scissors, I cut out small tabs on the edge of the piece of fabric. Then…

DSC_1627

….I grab a tab and rip straight across to get a strip of fabric. RIIIIIIP!

DSC_1628

That’s all there is to it, really. I keep ripping until I have a nice little pile of strips. Beware, there will be a lot of stray threads involved in the ripping process. This is normal.

DSC_1629

So here I have a nice pile from this silk piece. They are different sizes, because I’m using upcycled clothing, so the pieces I’m ripping from are not uniform in size or shape. I’ll sort it out later.

DSC_1630

I’ve also decided to use the jersey knit lining from the same upcycled shirt. Since you can’t rip knit, (or stretch velvet, another favorite fabric of mine to use in these projects) I just use a rotary blade to open up the shirt and cut long strips.

DSC_1631

Add ’em to the pile!

DSC_1632

I also discovered this gold colored silk button-down in my stash at some point and added it to my material pile – I thought it would be good to add depth to the color scheme. Rip rip rip!

DSC_1633

Okay, that’s a pretty good sized pile. It’s not all of my material, but I can always cut more if I need to. Time to apply them to the belt. First, though, one side of my belt doesn’t have a tie – so I am going to use the netted ribbon yarn for that. One good long length doubled over, then looped through the end of the belt, makes a nice tie. Additionally, the netted nature of the ribbon yarn can easily hook over any buttons placed on the belt, giving you more options for how to secure it around the waist.

DSC_1634

DSC_1635

Now, the fringe! I lay out all of my strips – since I am making a bustle-style back for this belt, I want to utilize my longest strips in the back middle, and put the shorter ones toward the front edges. So I organize my strips into piles according to size – long, medium, short. Then, take each strip and double it over.

DSC_1636

Using a large-ish hook, draw the loop at the end of the double strip through a chain-loop opening on the edge of the belt. You can also draw these directly through the stitches, or really wherever you want. FrEeForM!!

DSC_1638

DSC_1639

Draw the ends through the loop and tighten to create the fringe. Do this all across the belt, or anwhere you want your fabric fringe to be. I go through and add this layer of fabric on just the edge loops, going according to size as I mentioned earlier.

DSC_1641

DSC_1642

Once all of the loops on the very bottom have been fringed, I flip the belt over and work from the back side for a bit, hooking fringe into the middle layer of loops.

DSC_1645

DSC_1646

Again, there’s really not a wrong way to do this. You can fringe all from the front, or all from the back, or just do one layer, or do so many layers you can’t even see the mesh portion. That last one is what I’m aiming for.

DSC_1647

So I attach my strips just about anywhere they will fit.

DSC_1648

Then, flip it back over, and attach on the top portion of the mesh on the right side!

DSC_1649

Hm, needs just one final touch I think – so I attach just a few strands of a small ball of silky eyelash yarn I have in my materials pile.

DSC_1650

That’s the stuff. And now, I’m seriously done! I am so thrilled about the way this turned out, and also being able to share this creative process here on the blog 🙂 But I do have one more post in this series: the Wrap-Up! Check it out and don’t forget to show me what you’ve made!

Meanwhile, here’s more examples of fringe skirts from other belts I’ve done:

Mulberry5.jpg

“Mulberry” used strips of cut stretch velveteen. It also featured a mushroom pouch on it’s own loop, which can be worn around the neck as well. I didn’t include that type of pocket in this tutorial because I already have a mushroom pouch free pattern available!

ShepherdsPurse7.jpg

“Shepherd’s Purse” used only ripped cotton weave fabrics, like gauze and muslin.

Nightshade5.jpg

Instead of ripped fabric, the skirt for “Nightshade” is that netted ribbon yarn, all stretched out to make a frilly fringe.

-MF

 

PBT: Pointed Pouch

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Shaping Circular Crochet

The following is a basic overview of the geometry of shaping circular crochet, which I’ll use in the next section to create this fun pixie pouch!

DSC_1547

In circular crochet, your increases represent building “outward” to add to the circumference of the object, while your stitches represent building “upward” to add to the diameter/radius of the circle. If you don’t increase at the same rate as you add rows of stitches, your circle will start to tighten inward because you don’t have enough circumference to allow it to keep building outward. This is used to our advantage to make fun shapes – adding rows where you don’t increase periodically will change the way your piece is shaped, and you can make fun points and spheres and all sorts of things.

On the other hand, adding too many increases per round will make your circumference too full, and your piece will start to ruffle at the edges on the same principle as making we saw making ruffles and curlicues.

Additionally, the HEIGHT of your stitch will change the required rate of increase – so if you want to start a flat circle in double crochet instead of single crochet, you can’t start with the same number as you would with sc, because you are starting with a greater height so it requires a greater circumference – I generally use 12 dc to start a flat circle, and add 12 inc every round to keep it flat. On the same principle, if I want to start a pointed conical piece in dc, starting with 6 dc is ideal because it begins with a nice taper.

Manipulated circles is how I make many of my utility belt pockets, including the one here! So, let’s get started.

Pointed Pixie Pouch

Notes: I’m using a 3.5 mm hook and some handspun yarn I’ve had forever, and doing non-continuous circular crochet, which means I’m using a chain-3 length to begin (not counting as first dc) and using slip stitch in the first dc to end each round. I have left the beginning and end instructions off the shorthand pattern because they are the same for each round.

MR (Magic Ring – covered in PBT: Circle Pocket Part 1)

  1. 6 dc into the ring. Tighten ring. – 6 dc

DSC_1008

DSC_1010

I want this pouch to be pretty pointy at the bottom, so I’ll add another row of dc without increasing.
2. Dc even – 6 dc

DSC_1011.1

Next, I want to start increasing as I move upward to make the pouch big enough to put things into, but at this point I have a pretty tight round of dc. If I increase at the same rate that I started (adding 6 stitches for the next round, or increasing in ea stitch) I will end up with an abrupt change in circumference.

DSC_1012.1

If you like the bulbous look, no problem, but I want to make my change smoother and more gradual, so I will be increasing at half the rate here – or adding 3 stitches for every increase round.
3. Inc on 2 – 9 dc

DSC_1017.1

To continue the gradual lengthening, I add another non-increasing round.
4. Dc even – 9 dc

DSC_1019

Then another 3 stitch increase round.
5. Inc on 3 – 12 dc

DSC_1020

Then even again.
6. Dc even – 12 dc

DSC_1022

Now, I’m going to prepare to fatten this puppy up. That means I’m going to do two rounds in a row that each increase by three, creating  a less gradual change in circumference – that will bring me up to 18 dc..
7. Inc on 4 – 15 dc
8. Inc on 5 – 18 dc

DSC_1023

…18 dc is divisible by 6, so I can now start increasing by 6 on each increase round to make a bulbous shape and a bigger part of the pouch. Since 18 divided by 6 is three, I will go back to increasing every 3 stitches to make a total of 6 stitches added to this round.

9. Inc on 3 – 24 dc.
10. Inc on 4 – 30 dc.
11. Inc on 5 – 36 dc.
12. Inc on 6 – 42 dc.
13. Dc even – 42 dc.
14. Dc even – 42 dc.
15. Dec (decrease, or dc2tog) on 6 – 36 dc
16. Ch 3 (counts as first hdc + ch 1), sk next st, *hdc in the next st, ch 1, sk next st* around.
17. 2 sc in ea sp around

 

DSC_1485.1

Cut yarn and tie off. I left a row full of chain-1 spaces at the top of the pouch so that I’d have some place to string the little drawstring through. To make the drawstring, just chain a length and tie off, then weave it through the spaces. I like to finish mine with little simple tassels to hide the yarn tails.

DSC_1544

I also attached a bead by using a tapestry needle and a spare length of yarn and simply sewing it onto the pouch for a little extra decoration.

DSC_1545DSC_1547

There you have the third and final pocket I will be completing for this particular belt!  In the next post of this series, I’ll be demonstrating how to finally attach these pockets to the belt base.

The drawstring pouch style pockets are super useful and can also be a great place to feature a special yarn or texture. Here are some other examples of pouches I’ve made in this style:

Mulberry4.jpg

“Mulberry” features a few little bells sewn on to the point and the drawstring ties

Titania4.jpg

A simple rounded pouch starts out with a flat circle for the bottom 

ShepherdsCollage.jpg

The drawstring pouch for this belt uses yarn scraps and a leather cord for the tie

Kelp4.jpg

Extra-fancy pouches went into making “Kelp” – A conical pouch forms the base onto which I added surface textures to create a shell shape. The rounded pouch features a common freeform technique called bullion stitch!

 

PBT: Circle Pocket Part 2

Circle Pockets: Non-Continuous Circles, Color Changes, and Overlay

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Most of the crochet utility belts I make have circle pockets – I love their potential as a canvas for other shapes like mandalas, simple embroidery, or shell flower petals. Plus, I’m just really into circles.

The continuous orange circle I made in the previous post to demonstrate my shorthand and the principle of increases and whatnot was fun and all, but now it’s really time to use a little more color! The plajn orange circle will end up being the back of a circular pouch on this belt, so we need a matching size circle to make up the front. For this, I’ll start a new piece, worked non-continuously. Since continuous rounds don’t start and end in the same place, I don’t use them for multi-colored circles (because the stripes wouldn’t match up). I mean, you totally can if you want to though! FrEeForM baby!

DSC_0890

Non Continuous Circles & Color Changes

Non-continuous circles are worked with the exact same increase strategy, except you join with a slip stitch at the end of every round and start the next, new round by chaining (to count as the first stitch or not – your choice). I use the same shorthand as in the previous post for this, and just leave off the info on beginning and ending the round, which is the same every time: Ch to start (counts or doesn’t count as first st, up to you) blah blah blah, join with a slip stitch in the first st of the round.

DSC_0832

The front circle of the pocket is where I really like to use up the small scraps of color. Looking at my scrap options, I want to tend toward the smallest balls first because they may not be big enough to make it around the entire circle once it gets larger.

MR (Magic Ring)
1. 6 sc into ring
2. Inc every st. Color Change (CC)

DSC_0833

Rnd 1

DSC_0835

Rnd 2.

That’s as much as I can do with the first ball. To add the new yarn for Rnd 3, I start in a different st than the ending of my previous rnd, so that all of my joins are not in the same place and my seam ends up being less obvious.

DSC_0837

This also means my increases will be offset, so less of that hexagonal shaping to make a more even-looking circle.  I like to use a standing sc to join my new yarn, a technique explained in this great tutorial from Look At What I Made.

  1. Inc on 2. CC
  2. 4. Inc on 3. CC
  3. 5. Inc on 4, BLO. CC
DSC_0838

After Rnd 5

Overlay Double Crochet

Rnd 5 is worked in the Back Loop Only so that I can do some fancy stuff with it on the next round. I’ll be using those empty front loops to work an some overlay stitches, or stitches that go over the previous round to form layers.

Rnd 6 starts normally, with the new yarn joined wherever. I will be increasing at the normal rate, but the extra stitch of every inc will be a double crochet, worked into the FLO of Rnd 4 instead of the same Rnd 5 loop as the previous stitch.

6. Dc Overlay Inc on 5.
7. Inc on 6. CC

DSC_0841

Rnd 6

DSC_0844

To make an overlay dc, Yo and insert hook into the front loop of the stitch below, from bottom to top as shown

DSC_0847

Then work dc as normal

DSC_0852

End of Rnd 7

Spike Stitch

On the next round I’ll do another type of overlay called a spike stitch. I count it as an overlay because it layers over the previous round, but it doesn’t require free loops. Basically, you just insert the hook in the same space as one of the stitches of the previous round, and draw up a loop over an entire round (or two!) of crochet, then finish it like a normal sc. You can do this at any time, so it makes a great freeform stitch. I like to do mine at the increase, and as you can see here I placed them between each two overlay sts from Rnd 6.

  1. Spike st inc on 7. CC
  2.  Inc on 8. CC

 

DSC_0854

Draw up a loop

DSC_0855

Complete single crochet (or whatever stitch) as normal

DSC_0857

Rnd 8 completed

 

DSC_0858

Rnd 9 completed

10. Inc on 9.
11. Sc even, skipping a few stitches at the end and chaining a few instead. Sl st to join, then sl st a few more to secure. Cut yarn and tie off.

DSC_0860

End of Rnd 10

DSC_0862

Stop a few stitches before the end and chain a few stitches instead

Skipping the last few stitches and chaining makes a buttonhole for the button fastening for your circle pouch. I forgot to choose buttons when I was looking for materials, so I poke around in my collection and grab this wooden one. It just feels like the right one, even though the pale orange one matches better. I guess I just like the cut of its jib.

DSC_0863

Check to make sure the button just fits through your opening, making smaller or bigger if necessary.

DSC_0864

Assembling & Finishing

Now that you have two flat circles, weave in all of the ends of the front circle (the multi-color or what-have-you) and the central end of the back circle (the plain one).

Leave the outer yarn-end of the back circle unwoven so that you can attach your button to the inside face of that circle using the yarn end and a tapestry needle.

DSC_0866

Line your pockets up, then match the buttonhole on the front circle to the button on the back. Grab two locking stitch markers and pin those puppies together, leaving an opening about a quarter of the circumference at the top for the pocket opening.

DSC_0869

DSC_0870

I use locking stitch markers to mark where I want to seam to begin and end

Next we’ll be crocheting around the bottom part of both circles at once to attach them – so grab a matching or coordinating yarn (or a mismatching one – this is freeform after all) to do the seam. If you’re feeling sassy, string a few of those beads on there using the tapestry needle – I’ll show you what to do with them later.

DSC_0871

Join your yarn at the point where you put your stitch marker so that you’ll be working around the bottom ¾ or so of the pocket. Insert your hook through the top of the sc of both layers and work a sc. Continue to sc through both layers at once around the circumference – slip stitch works fine here too or hdc or even dc works fine here too, if you like – fReEfOrM ba- ok, you get the idea.

DSC_0874

DSC_0876

Crochet through both layers at once to seam

Once I reach near the bottom, it’s time to work the beads in. I like dangly things. Here’s two ways to do it:

For prestrung beads, chain a length and chain in the bead at the end. Slip stitch back down the chain and continue working the hem through both layers until you want to add another bead, then repeat.

DSC_0877

DSC_0883

DSC_0884

DSC_0885

For beads with larger holes that are not prestrung, chain a longer length, then slip stitch back down. Once the chain is finished, string the cord through the bead and then tie a small knot at the end. Continue to work the hem through both layers until you want to add another bead, then repeat.

DSC_0878

DSC_0879

DSC_0881

Once you’ve beaded to your heart’s content, keep single crocheting around the last portion of the pocket circles until you reach the other stitch marker. Cut yarn and tie off, then weave in your ends.

DSC_0886

DSC_0890

Ta-Da! You have your very own circle pocket for attaching to your pixie pocket belt! For how to attach, keep reading through this tutorial series 🙂

To wrap up, how about some more ideas for circle pockets? Here are some ways I’ve done them in past projects:

Hickory7.png

This circle pocket features a crochet overlay motif of the tree of life, from this awesome free pattern!

ShepherdsPurse3.jpg

Another overlay motif crocheted then sewn on appears on this plain circle pocket – a great chance to practice designing your own doily/mandala patterns.

Nightshade2.jpg

The circle pocket in “Nightshade” features beaded single crochet, working prestrung seed beads into the back side of each stitch.