Winter Poncho Pattern

True to form, I’ve circled back around to reworking an older design at almost the exact anniversary of it’s original release. Five years ago in January I released the Boho Fringe Poncho as my tenth paid pattern. Today, I’d like to introduce this same design as it’s been reformatted, tweaked for improvements, and released FOR FREE here on the blog!

You can still get the updated crochet pattern as a PDF in my Ravelry and Etsy stores, or keep scrolling for the free pattern (which includes everything in the PDF)

I really enjoy revisiting my patterns to make sure that they are the best that they can be, and this is kind of a constant task as I’m always trying to grow and improve my skills as a pattern designer. Sometimes I just have more to offer in terms of technical assistance – additional tutorial photos were a MUST with this piece – and sometimes I believe that the form & content of the design makes it a good candidate to be re-released for free (the Rhiannon Cowl is another great little project of mine that started as a paid PDF and then debuted on the blog as a free version!)

In this case, I considered just about every aspect of the pattern needed attention πŸ˜‰ Including the name! While I liked “Boho Fringe” it just didn’t really fit the nature of the poncho. This piece is a Big Booty Judy, made with thick warm woolen yarns, post stitches, and a cozy fit that hugs your shoulders for extra warmth. Realizing that its thicc qualities made it a perfect item to have in the coldest months I decided to rename it – the Winter Poncho!

This is a wonderful project for using up bulky or super bulky scraps (see the notes for more about yarn substitution), it uses large hook sizes so that the project works up quickly, and it’s waaaaaaarm πŸ™‚

Winter Poncho Crochet Pattern

Materials

7 skeins Bernat Roving (#5 weight, 100 g / 120 yds, 80% Acrylic, 20% Wool) – all solid-colored examples are made with this recommended yarn, the multi-colored examples are made with a mix of bulky and super bulky weight scrap yarns!
9.00 mm hook, 11.5 mm hook
Tapestry Needle
Scissors

Techniques Used

Chain (ch), Double Chain (dch), Double Crochet (dc), Slip Stitch (sl st), Front Post Double Crochet (fpdc), Back Post Double Crochet (bpdc) (click the links for tutorials!)

Measurements (approximate): 40” circumference at the top, 54” circumference at the bottom, 18”long (not including fringe)

Gauge:

4 sts & 3 rows = 2” in alternating fpdc/bpdc for 9.00 mm hook, 3 sts & 3 rows = 2” in alternating fpdc/bpdc for 11.5 mm hook.

Notes:

The chain-2 at the beginning of every round does not count as the first stitch of the round. When joining rounds with the slip stitch, skip the ch-2 entirely and join into the first fpdc of the round.

I have recommended Bernat Roving for this project, which is a #5 weight yarn but it gauges somewhere between a bulky yarn and a super bulky yarn. Some of my Winter Ponchos have mixed #5 & #6 weight yarns, which works pretty well –  but be sure to follow gauge if you substitute yarns!

The Winter Poncho is closed at the top with a drawstring, but the rest of the shape is dictated by hook size and follows the same number of stitches through every round. If you need a wider poncho, evenly place an even number of increases at Round 10 in order to size up.

Two types of fringing is offered in this pattern, the Double Chain Fringe of the original design, and the regular fringe which I have been favoring lately – both types are included in the instructions.

Poncho (Main Body)

Starting with the 9 mm hook, dch 80. Join with a slip stitch to form a ring, making sure not to twist.

Rnd 1: Ch 2, dc in the same stitch as join. (1 dc in the next st) 79 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc of the round. – 80 sts

Rnd 2: Ch 2, fpdc in the first dc of the last round, bpdc in the next dc. (1 fpdc in the next st, 1 bpdc in the next st) 39 times. Join with a sl st in the first fpdc of the round – 80 sts

Rnds 3: Ch 2, fpdc in the first fpdc of the last round, bpdc in the next bpdc. (1 fpdc in the next st, 1 bpdc in the next st) 39 times. Join with a sl st in the first fpdc of the round.

Rnds 4 – 10: Rpt Rnd 3.

Switch to the 11.5 mm hook, then continue in pattern for rounds 11-27.

Rnds 11 – 27: Rpt Rnd 3.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Double Chain Drawstring

Double chain a length of 60” (about 120 DCh stitches) with your main yarn. Cut yarn and tie off. Weave this cord through the first row of post stitches at the top of the poncho, going underneath each FPDC and over each BPDC. Finish the ends with either a stranded fringe, tassel, pompom, or whatever you like!

To work the double chain, see my tutorial post here.

Double Chain Fringe

The double chain fringe offers a bolder fringed look than the regular stranded yarn fringe, and copies the original inspiration piece for this design. For a humbler decoration, see the instructions for traditional fringe.

Using the 9.00 mm hook, dch 25- 45 sts or about  10 – 20” of unstretched double chain cord, depending on how long you want your chain fringe. Cut yarn and tie off. Make 19 more double chain cords of about the same length.

When you have twenty cords total, weave in all the yarn ends if you want a very neat fringe. Leave the yarn tails hanging down a bit for a more organic fringe.

If you survived the tedium of end-weaving, the next step is to double up the cords so that ends are together and a loop forms in the middle. Push that loop through the top of a fpdc stitch (NOT through the post) on Rnd 27 (the larger end of the piece).

Insert the ends of the double chain cord through the loop and draw them to tighten.

Repeat with the 19 other fringe cords, placing them every 2nd fpdc stitch so that there is 1 non-fringed fpdc between every fringed one. 

Weave in all ends.

Stranded Fringe

For a traditional fringe, get a book or length of cardboard 6” wide. Using your yarn of choice, wrap your yarn around the width 80 times, then cut one side to leave a bundle of 12” strands.

Double your strand over and use the loop at the end to thread the two loose ends through each crochet stitch around the border of the poncho.

Once you’ve put the finishing touches on your Winter Poncho, make sure all your ends are woven in before scurrying out into the cold!

I think the saying goes “Make new patterns but keep the old; one is silver, the other is gold!” Or something like that anyway πŸ˜‰

-MF

Pattern Gallery: The Scrappy Collection

I’d gotten out of the habit of doing pattern collection posts until last December when I couldn’t resist a Krampus-themed one. Now I’ve been thinking about all the scrappy projects I’ve done, and decided I’d do one focused just on my pattern offerings because hey, what am I here for anyway πŸ˜‰

Scrappy projects are those that utilize scrap lengths of yarn, leftovers that aren’t big enough for full projects. Technically any project can use scrap yarn if you want it to, but these are projects I designed to feature the nature of scraps in some way, or create an easy way to use them – i.e – strategize a way to feature unwoven in ends & short stripes, or create a pattern flattering to frequent color changes.

So here you go! I hope you enjoy and come share your projects on our Facebook Group, the Magic Fantastic Crochet Atelier!

Scrappy Patterns

1. Scrappy Granny Shawl – FREE. Super easy to customize and looks great in virtually any yarn. The Granny block stitches are a familiar and easy semi-open pattern that breaks up the color changes creating neat colored patches to the eye. Plus you just gotta feel like a boho damsel in this one!

2. Wayfarer Ruana – This giant ruana is a FREE pattern that combines both knit and crochet. The knit body of the ruana utilizes some very small scraps and is a serious scrapbuster! I also designed the garment with a fringe that incorporates the loose ends of all those scraps, so you don’t have to weave in. The edge of the piece is a sewn-on strip of granny squares, because why not? Hidden within this blog post pattern is a detailed, free, and easy tutorial for crochet granny squares designed for beginners, because I wanted to πŸ˜‰

3. Pixie Belt Tutorial – Inspired by less traditional styles (or perhaps FAR more traditional styles depending on your views of the little folk) comes the supremely fun to create Pixie Belt. This project is great for mixing and matching yarns, using up small scraps, and even busting some of your fabric stash. I make them and sell them as costume pieces to friends and festival-goers, or perhaps you know a little folk yourself who needs a mini-version πŸ™‚ The free tutorial for customizing your own comes as a series on my blog but is also purchasable as a single collection in one PDF.

4. Scrappy Knit Duster – The free knit tutorial for this western duster coat follows in the heritage of the Wayfarer Ruana, using small bits to knit long panels of color, leaving the unwoven ends as part of the fringe which is incorporated into the design. This garment provides a more snug fit than the ruana – and sleeves of course – because I wanted something that I could use for more everyday wear.

5. Rhiannon Hooded Cowl – I originally made these using scraps, then decided to write a pattern for the design to sell and used preplanned commercial yarns. Eventually, I decided it needed an aesthetic renewal and returned it to it’s scrappy state where I think it truly functions best, offering it both for free on my blog (via the link at the beginning of the paragraph) or in purchasable PDF format via my shops (linked at the top of the blog). I love that this design lives a double life ❀ appropriate.

6. Sun Dogs Throw – This free throw blanket crochet pattern was a result of my desire to destash a lot of colorful worsted weight acrylics – though I chose a rainbow so I could have a bright, fun camping blanket this season, this throw works great in any color combination and the 8-point expansive design makes it extra cozy and wrappable. The center uses up small scraps neatly and the outer edges eat up whole spare skeins πŸ˜‰

7. The Flower Child Pullover – One of the few exclusively paid patterns on the list, you can find it in my pattern shops linked above or through the blog post linked just here πŸ™‚ Though technically I could list the cousin pattern the Mandala Top in this collection as well, I won’t because the Flower Child pattern has a feature that makes it specific to scrap busting – a list of the approximated yardage requirements for each round, for #4 worsted weight yarns. Hopefully that chart makes it easier to use up scraps by taking away some guesswork!

8. Daydreamer Poncho – Another pattern originally sprung from scraps, written for preplanned commercial yarn, and then remade in the image of Scrap πŸ™‚ I guess I do that a lot. Anyway, I also revamped this design to include a skirt look, making it convertible too. The Daydreamer Poncho is a paid crochet pattern available in my pattern stores (linked above) or linked on the page given here with more info ❀

That’s it for my scrappy offerings today, though I’m sure more will occur in future. Looking back at all these patterns, I’m entertained at how they are pretty evenly split between faerie and rustic, fantasy and romantic western. Am I, at heart, a fairy cow girl? The historical evidence is fairly damning. Lol!

-MF

Sundogs Throw

Recently as I was attempting to cram coax yarn into my shelves while my friend Arika looked on and giggled, I got inspired to do a little stash-busting. Instead of continuing to struggle, I threw out some spare skeins out on the floor and together we crafted an eye-pleasing sequence of colors just for the fun of it, and as I looked on my mental list nudged me. I’ve been meaning to do something like this for a while!

Based on an old motif I made years ago, this circular blanket pattern is worked in #4 weight acrylic yarns changing color every (or nearly every) row. It’s rainbow inspiration is perfect for using up the bright, cheap acrylics that are ubiquitous in my stash thanks to my (welcome) reputation among my friends as a walking Yarn Orphanage πŸ˜‰

Named the Sun Dogs Throw after the optical effects that occur when ice crystals refract light into rainbows around the sun – I imagined this retro, prismatic piece as a tribute to funky love blankies everywhere, the kind that travel with you but always remind you of home. And what better way to show it off than with an impromptu Rainbow Sprite photoshoot with your friends?

(Models clockwise from bottom left – Debbra Lee, Daisey Denson, Kate May, and Arika Harris!)

And so I created a summertime throw for laying under the rays of the sun, or draping across the chair for morning coffee by the fire. It makes a pretty good wearable shawl too πŸ˜‰ I hope you love it! I’ll be taking mine camping as soon as possible ❀

Update!: The Ravelry Page is up for this design so give it a fave if you want to save it for later ❀

Materials

Hook: 6.00 mm

Yarn: Lots of colors in worsted weight acrylics. My estimate ~ 1000 – 1200 yards

Gauge = 6 sts & 3 rows = 2”

Finished measurements: 85” across from crest to crest, 55” across from trough to trough

Notes: Change color after every round or so. Join new color to the first stitch of the round.

Instructions

To begin, make Magic Ring

Rnd 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc). 11 dc into the ring, join with a sl st into the 1st dc – 12 dc.

Rnd 2: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc). 1 dc in the same st. 2 dc in each of the next 11 sts. Join with a sl st in 1st dc. – 24 dc

Rnd 3: Sc in the same st as join, ch 4, skip 2 sts (sc in the next st, ch 3, skip 2 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in 1st sc – 8 ch-3 spaces made.

Rnd 4: Sl st into the next ch-3 space. Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc 4 more times into the same space, ch 1. (5 dc into the next ch-3 space, ch 1) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in 1st dc. – 8 blocks of 5-dc, 8 ch-1 spaces made.

Rnd 5: Ch 2 (counts as 1st hdc), 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, hdc in the next st, 2 sc in the next ch-1 space. (Hdc in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, hdc in the next st, 2 sc in the next ch-1 space) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st hdc.

Rnd 6: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc in the next st. 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts. Sc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, sc2tog over the next 2 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 7: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, skip next sc. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, sk next st) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 8: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st into the 1st dc.

Rnd 9: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 5 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr)  in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 10: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 7 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 11: Ch 3 (counts as 1 st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 9 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 12: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 11 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 13: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 13 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 14: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 15 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 15: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 17 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 16: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 17: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

 Rnd 18: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.  

Rnd 19: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts. Sk next st. Sl st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 20: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 21: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. Sk next st. Sl st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 22: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 23: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 24: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 25: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 26: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 27: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 28: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 29: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join

Rnd 30: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 31:  Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 34 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 32: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 36 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 33: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 38 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 34: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 40 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 35: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 42 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 36: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 44 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Cut yarn and tie off, weave in all ends.

(they’re about to drop a sick album)

Is it just me or is there something really, really comforting about a handmade, bright, crocheted blanket? I slept under them as a kid all the time – my grandma Metzger’s work – and we used them as blankets to lay on the grass in the summer, and they always smelled like the same closet, the closet upstairs next to my parent’s room, where I was born.

I hope this blanket design becomes like those, when it goes out in the world. The kind you can feel the love in. ❀

-MF

P.S- We all dug in my crochet bin and decorated with other goodies for this photoshoot, so here’s what else we’re wearing!

Me: (Pictured just above) The Valkyrie Top

Daisey Denson: Mehndi Halter Top, Lotus Hooded Duster

Debbra Lee: Embla Vest (sleeved) , Patchwork skirt sewn by me from Wendy Kay’s No Gathers Skirt pattern on Etsy.

Arika Harris: Embla Vest (linked above), and the Sundogs Throw of course πŸ˜‰

Kate May: Embla Vest (linked above) and Basic Bralette

Thanks again to my amazing models for always being willing to dress up crazy, hike out into the mud and rocks, alternately freeze / sweat / get blinded by the sun, and generally have a blast with me πŸ™‚

Scrappy Knit Duster

A few years ago I espied some beautiful images of knit ruana-style shawls and ponchos that used striking color striping in a simple stitch pattern. The knit stitches were loosely made, giving the garment a pretty drape, and the simple tie-offs from color changing formed a natural fringe with a western look. The artist using this beautiful style, I found out later, was the Kristen Hoke of Posh By Gosh on Etsy.

I was enamored, for many reasons: its beauty came from its simplicity and versatility. It featured only knit stitches, so I could easily wrap my head around it. Plus, ample opportunity to play with color and use up spare bits of yarn! I rushed to gather all of my spare skeins and yarn bits, and started a massive upcycling project inspired by her knits – that was my first try, which became a blanket because as it turns out I was not very good at estimating knit sizes at the time.

No worries, though – I tried again, this time turning my inspiration into a project with a crochet twist! The knit ruana, featuring crocheted granny square edges, became the Wayfarer Ruana tutorial, available for free here on my blog!

By then, I was pretty satisfied but I also found myself addicted. These projects were so easy to pick up and put down (because of the endless mindless knitting, it was definitely stitch therapy) and they were so perfect for using up very small bits of yarn. I wanted to design another garment in this style! This time, with even less weaving in of ends. And how about wearable anywhere?

And more SASSY FRINGE?

So I got to work knitting up this Scrap Knit Duster, and put together a little tutorial for it along the way. The two front panels are great for using up very small balls of leftover yarn, especially singe there isn’t any weaving in ends (or at least, very little)!

And that’s not even a fraction of the yarn gumballs I have stowed away.

Since the garment is just made of rectangles folded and seamed, adventurous souls could easily translate this into a crochet piece (just keep your gauge loose so that the fabric drapes well).

Hope you love making it as much as I do ❀ If you do, why not give this project a fave on Ravelry?

Materials:

US Size 11 (8.00 mm) Knitting Needles, 1 set 24” circular (long straight needles are fine in substitute for this), 1 set 40” circular (necessary)

A lot of random scrap yarn ❀ I chose one neutral toned yarn to kind of become the β€œbackground” for the colored yarns, as well as a trim color.

Tape Measure

Scissors

Tapestry Needle

6” book, cardboard, or fringe making tool

Gauge: About 6 sts & 8 rows = 2” in garter stitch
Stitches Required: Cast On, Knit, Purl, Bind Off

Finished measurements: 38” long, bust and waist measurements variable

Instructions:

Begin by taking your measurements. You want the total circumference of the garment to be about as wide as the widest part of your frame (whether that’s your bust, your hips, or your belly) so that it will just be able to wrap you up. I used 34” as my circumference. It’s a little under my actual measurements, but I wanted my duster to be fitted to me, and I know this knit fabric stretches accommodatingly.

The main part of the duster is made with three panels. The two front panels, which are made to equal almost 1/4th  the circumference each, so half my measurement when added together. The one back panel is made to equal the other half, and is added after the first two panels are finished (this part is the same basic process as the Wayfarer Ruana, just not as wide).

However, I know I’m going to be adding a trim to the front, so my two front panels will be made a little shorter. 1/4th of 34” is 8.5”, but I’ll plan on adding almost 2” in border, so 6.5” or so. I decide that my front panels are going to be 20 stitches long each, which when plugged into my gauge, will land me at about 6.5” for each front panel width.

If you want a less fitted piece, just stick with the simple math – Each Front Panel is ΒΌ your circumference, and don’t worry about the trim length for now.

  1. Cast On 20 (or whatever number you land on)
  2. Rows 1-150: Knit each stitch. Change color at the end of the row when necessary or desired….

BUT….

ONLY change colors on one side of the piece. Either side is fine, but stick with one side. This is the side that will face β€œout” later, and form the fringe hem at the sides, saving you from having to weave in a bunch of ends.

Make 150 rows of garter stitch for the first front panel, DO NOT BIND OFF.

  • Stick your first panel on a holding needle and repeat this process for the second panel.
  • Once both of your panels are complete,  arrange your panels so that the tie-off fringe sides are facing away from each other. Using yarn and your long needles (circular or otherwise), begin to knit across the top of the first panel, starting on the fringe side. Once you knit across the first panel, CO 10 stitches for the collar of the garment. Then, continue knitting across the second panel, ending on the second fringed side.

These 50 stitches (20 for the first panel + 10 for the collar + 20 for the second panel) come out to about 16.5”. 16.5 + (6.5 + 6.5) = 29.5”. Add the (2” + 2”) on either side for the front color trim, and I will have my 34” circumference achieved.

But first…

  • Knit 150 rows for the back panel. Change colors at the end of the row whenever necessary or desired. Colors can be tied off on either side of the back panel.

Once you’ve finished the front and back panels, Cast off your piece. I like to use Jenny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind-Off (JSSBO), a video tutorial for which can be found here.

Sleeves

Fold your piece in half. Using your tape measure, measure from the top of your shoulder to the lowest part of your armpit. Double this number is how wide you need your sleeve to be – I got about 9”.

We will form the sleeve by picking up one flat row, centered on the same row as the collar is made. Picking up knit stitches from the side of garter stitch is tricky because we are only picking up ONE stitch per each TWO rows. So to get a 9” measurement, I need 28 stitches. (28 sts / 6 stitches per 2 inches = 4.6, or  9.3” inches.)

So beginning from the bottom of each panel, I count up from the hem 122 rows and place a stitch marker. This leaves 28 rows left on the front panel. Repeat count up 122 rows on the back panel (same side) and place a stitch marker.  Pick up 28 knit stitches in the side of these 56 rows that land in between your marked stitches, using your needles.

  • Knit 70 rows, changing color at the end of the row when necessary or desired.
  • Using your preferred border color, switch to working a 4 x 4 rib. Knit 4, Purl 4 and in in subsequent round, knit the knits and purl the purls. Work 5 rounds.

You can change your rib width based on what number your sleeve stitch count is divisible by – for instance, 28 is divisible by 4 so my ribs will be even. If you have 35, you can work a 5 x 5 rib instead, etc.

  • BO, preferably with a stretchy bind-off method as mentioned above.
  • Repeat same sleeve process on the opposite side.

Fold the entire garment along the middle line that runs through the center of the sleeves and the collar. It helps to lay it flat on the floor, so you can brush the fringe out flat. In this next part, we will use a tapestry needle and a length of yarn to seam the duster.

  1. Grab a long-ish length of yarn and thread through the tapestry needle. A simple whip stitch through both layers of edges is all that is needed to seam the garment up the side. Keep seaming from the bottom all the way to the sleeve end, starting a new seam if you run out of yarn.  Repeat for the opposite side.

To keep your tension even, pull the seam thread tight by stretching the garment out as you sew. Be careful to keep the tie-off fringe out of your seam.

Front Border

Once you have seamed up the side of the duster and through to the end of the sleeves on both sides, clip your thread and tie the ends off to blend them into the fringe (some you may want to weave in, such as the ends at the hem of the sleeves). Now it’s time to create the ribbed border around the front opening and collar.

  1. Using your 40” circular needles and your border colored yarn, Pick up 1 knit stitch from every 2 garter stitch rows along the inside border of the garment. If your panels are 150 rows long, you’ll work 75 stitches up one side, 10 into the collar, and 75 down the other side. 
  2. K 4, P 4 to create a 4×4 rib. Work 9 rows of rib by knitting the knits and purling the purls. BO using the JSSBO.

Almost there! Are you excited yet?

Extra Fringe

Now we’ve got a really rockin’ fringey thing going on, but the tie-offs look a little scraggly in my opinion, so I use my 6” book to create some fringe lengths by wrapping the yarn around then cutting through the bundle. You’ll have to lay out your piece flat again, and comb all the tie-off fringe out flat to prepare for the next step.

  1. Using a crochet hook, loop one strand of fringe in the side of every fringe-less row up the side of the body and sleeves. Repeat for the other side.
  2. Finally, weave in any stray ends that aren’t part of the fringe. Odds are you will have a few across the shoulders where the sleeve attaches – I wove those down into the seam for the most part.

Once you have all the extra fringe attached, arrange your duster so that the sleeve and the side of the body are laying long the same line, parallel. Comb all the fringe, including the tie off, so that it is laying mostly flat. Using a sharp scissors, give your baby a haircut – I went down to about 4″ for the fringe.

If you have any stray yarn ends that need woven in (such as scraps that ran out in the middle of a row, or border yarns from adding the trim), take care of those. Once you have, you are done!

Voila! Now you have a scrappy bohemian rock’n’roll knit duster that is warm and wearable, looks great with anything, and that you MADE YOURSELF πŸ˜€ !!!

Thanks for visiting my blog and making art with me – I think this may be one of my favorite things I’ve ever made! I say that a lot though πŸ˜›

It was certainly fun to photograph. I hiked up a VERY steep hill, camera gear in tow, in order to prance around in heels on the edge of a cliff. Who says knitting isn’t extreme??

-MF

Skinny Scrappy Scarf!

My lovely friends have often shown up at gatherings exclaiming “I have yarn for you!” – and this is a situation to be thoroughly enjoyed. However, I can’t always find a use for every single one of theseΒ yarns, among them long-forgotten cheap acrylics from granny’s attics, abandoned yarn sale yarn, and other orphaned skeins.

Some of these yarns have a lot more merit than others – and I try to use everything I can possibly use, because it is a rare occasion that I can bring myself to evict the yarn from the Sad Yarn Orphanarium.

However, I finally said goodbye to a huge bag full of old yarn that I just knew I wasn’t ever going to use (and actually most of it was stuff that I had bought :P) It’s slated to go to Goodwill, where it might be just the thing some other stitchmaster needs.

As a result, my yarn wall looks a lot less scary. This has virtually nothing to do with the following project. I’m just proud of myself.

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I cheated. I still have a lot of yarn that isn’t on that wall. BUT, at least I no longer fear an avalanche.

Okay, it’s notΒ totally unrelated, because while I was cleaning I rediscovered some old handspun and some other bits and pieces that would look nice together and got inspired to create a scrap-buster project!

This little skinny scarf combines beading, crocheting, and knitting to create a unique artsy accessory that’s great for using up small lengths of yarn.

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Skinny Scrappy Scarf

Materials Needed:
20 g packet of 6/0 seed beads
1 beading needle
#10 cotton crochet thread
2.10 mm steel crochet hook
12.5 mm knitting needles
An assortment of yarn scraps, preferably 15-20+ yards each

  1. First, grab your beading needle, crochet thread, and half of your packet of beads (set the other half aside). Your amount doesn’t have to be exact. String the beads on your crochet thread.
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  2. With your 2.10 hook, start chaining the crochet thread. Every 15-20 chains (again, we’re not worried about exact numbers here) grab a bead and include it in your stitch.

    Continue beading & chaining until you run out of your first half of beads and you have a nice little beaded strand ball. Cut the thread and tie it off. You can go ahead and make a second ball from the other half of your beads now, or (if you are sick of chaining like I was) you can wait until you’re ready for it later.
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  3. Using your beaded strand and two other yarns, CO 6 sts to your 12.5 mm knitting needles using three strands.
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  4. Using all three strands, knit the next row. Purl the next row. Repeat, alternating knitting and purling and tying in new yarn strands whenever you run out of one.
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  5. Once you have your scarf almost the length you’d like (for me this was about 60″), replace one of your strands with the second beaded yarn ball and continue knitting until you run out of beaded cord. Bind off and weave in all of your ends.

I like the beaded cord because it gives the ends a nice swing-y weight! These also make pretty good handmade gifts, since they don’t take a ton of time to make.

Here in the midwest it’s getting pretty nippy outside… maybe a nice free cowl pattern is more weather appropriate for you?

-MF