Snapdragon Pixie Belt

Spring and summer always makes me eager to craft up cute festival items, despite the fact that I haven’t gone to any events for over a year now. In the course of cleaning out my room while moving last month I happened upon a stash of teal upcycled sari ribbon and had to bust out one of my favorite projects with it: the Pixie Pocket skirt belt.

I make these useful crocheted belts out of scrap yarn, ripped scrap fabric, beads, bells, lace – you name it, I’ll cram it on a pixie belt. They are one of my top selling items (my friends tend to grab them up before they can even get to the a festival vending booth) and just supremely fun to make & wear.

You can get the absolutely FREE pattern tutorial series for this project on my blog, or help support me more directly by buying the PDF version (includes everything found in all of the tutorial posts) in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store!

Here are just a few others I’ve made πŸ˜‰

Each of these 100% unique creations gets its own personality, and I name them after plants every time, to embody the nature spirit pixies I imagine wearing them! This one is called “Snapdragon” after the flowers that I remember obsessing over in my childhood – I would run over to the flower gardens that lined the church grotto, eager to pinch the blossoms to make them “snap” like my mom showed me.

Snapdragon features a circular pocket made with a bright applique, the center formed by the “bullion eye” motif I use in my free Forest Guide Hat pattern, with a cute eyeball charm I imagined to look like a dragon’s eye.

The rectangular pouch is made from super bulky yarn that I hand spun on my wheel, hand dyed by me and spun onto a mohair core. A super ruffle-y drawstring pouch imitates the expansion of flower petals, and a little extra sassinesss is added by the crochet net that swings on the hip over the fringe skirt.

All this is mounted on a teal belt with subtly variegated dragon scales (of course!) from crocodile stitch, a favorite textural technique of mine. The belt itself is a bit oversized on me so I wrapped it around, using the ties on the end to weave it in and out of the belt itself to secure it.

I had to pair it with that lush velvet bralette that I made recently, as it happened to match! The bralette is Bernat Baby Velvet made from my (also FREE) Basic Bralette design, with the Curvy Bralette modifications added in. I made this super soft top while drafting up some modifications to the design – those updates are now reflected in the original pattern and in the PDF version that I sell as well πŸ™‚

Thanks for visiting to check out my latest work and be sure to subscribe and follow me on my social media channels so you don’t miss anything! I’ve got some great designs in the works and I try to always be updating and improving things too πŸ™‚

For the love of fiber<3 ❀

-MF

The Only Constant

One of my favorite sayings goes “The only constant is change.”

It reminds me that the live happily in life, you always need to acknowledge the shifting nature of it. If you go along expecting everything to be the same, always resisting when forced to take paths that you didn’t intend, life and it’s transformative progress will seem to be a battle.

One of my other favorite sayings goes “Man plans, god laughs” πŸ˜‰

I’ll be reflecting in this post about what I’ve been doing with Morale Fiber over the past year – it’s more of a diary entry really, collecting my thoughts and tipping you off for what’s on the horizon for my designs!

2020 – Plague Year

It’s obviously been a weird one. In addition to switching my business from part-time to full-time in 2020, just a few months into the year Corona Virus struck and my proximity to at-risk loved ones made self-employment more imperative than usual. Still luckily things are going well, and I created & maintained my schedule for the year which included 6 written patterns, 4 tutorials, 2 brand new free hat patterns, 3 remodeled patterns, and lots more crochet morale boosting!

I’ve got a couple projects/designs in the works to finish off the year’s production list, and I’m now into my normal “holidays” phase of the year, despite the lack of holiday events upcoming (stupid plague).

YouTube Channel (& SALE!!)

One of the biggest efforts I made this year was reaching my goal of monetizing my YouTube Channel, which I’ve been developing as quickly as my creaky, video-hating old bones can manage. But I did make that goal also, thanks to all the watchers & subscribers, so I’m holding a special pattern sale as a thank-you!

All PDF versions of the full-length patterns available on my YouTube Channel (and a few that are all written PDF but have video component tutorials) are ON SALE for 50% off now through November 15 on Ravelry ❀ ❀ Here’s a list of the patterns on sale, linked to Ravelry – use the code “YOUTUBE” at checkout to get the discount!

Patterns on Sale:
Lotus Duster
Gnome Toboggan
Kismet Poncho
Tree of Life
Forest Guide Hat
Feather & Scale Halter
Cobweb Wrap
Elf Coat

Monetizing my YouTube channel will help me continue to bring out free content available to everyone while also giving me the financial support to keep publishing great quality, full-scale written PDF crochet patterns. Another great way to support my art: The Tip Jar!

20th Pixie Belt: Lotus

I realized at some point that the next Pixie Pocket Belt I made would be my 20th, and so I determined to make a really special one. I have been making these unique crocheted utility belts freehand, doing them completely different each time, for a few years now.

I used hand-dyed yarn to create a partial, semi-circular Lotus Mandala – don’t ask me how I did that specifically because I won’t be posting a pattern, sorry! These guys are FrEeFoRm, but I did create a series of tutorial guides for helping people get started making Pixie Pocket Belts of their own, check it out if you like πŸ™‚

After that, I got out my special hand-dyed upcycled fabric given to me by my friend Kate, who had it left over from a studio art project – and it happened to match so well! What I ended up with is a watery, soft, draping train of prismatic lace and tatters, topped with a shimmery white lotus flower circular pocket and soft drawstring bag and toadstool pouch accents.

I put it over another hand-dyed upcycled project of mine, an in-progress rag gown, fit for a water sprite dredged from the bottom of a flowery pond. No mud, no lotus ❀

Elf Coat Expansion

Pretty much as soon as I put down the last touches on the Elf Coat design, I knew I was going to have to pick it up again eventually! One part of the sleeve design always nagged at me, and I did intend to give it pockets eventually – and lo, the flood of requests for Plus Sizes ❀ ❀

As much as I wanted to fulfill these fixes, I needed a break from the Elf Coat, so I took a couple years off to think about things πŸ˜‰ And now I’m back, tackling the first part of the Elf Coat redesign and expansion! The first task is to fix the sleeve bit and to get a pocket option figured out, then update those changes to the already-existing sizes (S-M-L).

Afterward, I design & test the plus sizes! This is exciting and if you’d like to be a part of any of the testing for the new updates, join the Morale Fiber Facebook Group – The MFCA – and keep an eye out for the testing call!

Other Projects & Updates

I’ve got a number of bigger new designs on the horizon, which I’m also going to need help testing πŸ˜‰ None are solid enough yet to list here, but I’ve got a hoard of updatable old patterns and things to occupy myself until things coalesce, of course.

I’m also thinking that this website, moralefiber.blog, really needs a few changes – it’s remained virtually the exact same since I opened it five years ago. Which makes sense, because I’m much more concerned with producing crochet content than updating the way the site looks – but eventually one must try to stay efficient. Hopefully I don’t wreck the way it works in the process!

Meanwhile…

Until Morale Improves, the Crocheting Will Continue ❀

-MF

Freeform #1

For years now I’ve had my eye on creating a piece in the classic Freeform style, a method of crochet that rejects the use of pattern or pre-planned formations and uses highly textural and varied crochet stitches to create odd, asymmetric pieces called “scrumbles.”

Though any crocheting without a pattern could technically be called freeform or freestyle, I differentiate the classic Freeform technique as having a few key characteristics: lack of pattern or overall plan, emphasis on chaotic form and texture over cohesive visual harmony, and reliance on several iconic motifs common in modern freeform (such as spirals, bullions, puffs, and other textural stitches).

Freeform scrumbles are finished bits of crochet that are then arranged and connected to form the final piece – anything from a freestanding “painting” of forms to a highly ornate coat to furniture covers (I dream of freeforming over an entire couch one day…).

Sometimes sewn together, sometimes connected via an openwork web of chains as in traditional Irish lace – the scumbles are like a puzzle you get to create AND solve!

After looking to such Freeform crochet geniuses as Prudence Mapstone and Hannah Martin of Of Mars, perusing some playlists for Freeform shapes on Youtube, and endlessly scrolling the Freeform Crochet World Group on Facebook, I finally collected a bunch of yarn and started scumbling.

And scrumbling.

And scrumbling.

After 8 months of slow progress, and lots of learning curves, I finally put the finishing touches on Freeform #1!

I knew it would be a shawl from the start, but the rest of the journey of this project was a complete and utter mystery until it was finally finished.

I must have arranged and rearranged the pieces so many times, in so many combinations! There are even a few eyeballs stuck in there, left over from practicing bullion eyes for the Forest Guide Hat.

The colors were chosen to be an earthy rainbow, with lots of gem tones (my favorite). Plenty of odd bits of hand-dyed and hand-spun yarn were included that I also created – which adds to the unique and personal “process” art touch.

At some point along the way, I started becoming (more) obsessed with moths, and I couldn’t stop picturing this piece as moth wings, or at least some winged bug-eyed thing – so the prism goggles came out to play πŸ˜‰

I’m overall thrilled with how this piece turned out – better than my expectations, to be sure! My first full-size freeform will be staying in my closet as I don’t think I could bear to part with it.

It’s great to create something that is impossible to write a pattern from! These days it’s hard to crochet anything that I don’t start to consider writing a pattern for (cue the incessant note-taking), but with freeform, that’s obviously not an option…

Although I may do some tutorial videos for the techniques I used at some point!

If you want to try out freeform but don’t want to commit to a huge project, my Pixie Pocket Belt Tutorial series uses freeform techniques to create cute, quick costume projects.

This shawl really pushed my boundaries and challenged me, and I value it all the more because of that.

-MF

Sunflower Lotus Vest

It’s been a while since I made the Lotus Vest, the Free-Size circular shawl version of my Lotus Mandala design, seen also in the Lotus Duster (all free patterns available on my blog – just follow the links!)

So there I was, trying to use up some of my Quarantine stash while on Staycation, and I plumbed the depths of the cotton bin to find a lot of the Lion Brand 24/7 cotton yarn – the same kind I used to make the original piece.

Stashbusting achieved! I moved the armholes a little closer together, and skipped a few of the chain mesh rows – but here’s my latest version of the Lotus Circular Vest, crocheted with sunflowers in mind πŸ™‚

If you don’t prefer written patterns, I do have a video tutorial for the Lotus Duster, a similar pattern, which can be make sleeveless as well. Get that by going to the my YouTube Channel Playlist here.

There’s also a great Dutch version of this pattern, translated by Iris of Een Mooi Gebaar – you can get that for FREE on her website, or get the downloadable, portable, printable Dutch translation PDF pattern file in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry store!

Stay cool out there! ❀

-MF

P.S – the crocheted top I’m wearing in these pictures is the Valkyrie Top!


Going the Distance

Happy Monday! I hope everyone out there is feeling well and healthy – I am, if just a touch stir crazy. But the weather is beautiful and I’ve been blessed with a lot of opportunities to hike out in the isolated woods recently πŸ™‚

It’s been a few weeks since my last blog post, so I thought I’d write up a little summary of what’s on my schedule right now – a couple new projects and previews, plus giveaways! I’m lucky to have already been working from home when the stay-at-home order was put in my place to mitigate the spread of Covid-19 in my state, so I have plenty in the works and more on the horizon for as long as my yarn stash holds out (even then, the emergency reserves are flush...)

So, cheers! Be sure to subscribe to my blog, and like & follow my Facebook Page for more fun crochet stuff!

Star & Moon Twirling Gown:

Another project made from the very well-appreciated Wendy Kay’s No-Sew Gypsy Skirt pattern, which I purchased from Etsy years ago and have used a LOT. I think this is my eighth skirt from that pattern.

Modeled by the lovely Sarina Newbold, this celestial piece is 100% cotton fabric donated by a friend, and I used the long-wedge version of the pattern to create a gown-length mega-skirt that adjusts from XS up to XXL at the waistband.

As you can see, it is just KILLER for twirling in. I am patiently building my sewing skills, because I have some really neat ideas for more crochet/fabric fusion clothing ❀ in the future!

Hedge Witch Hat PDF:

Sarina also modeled her new custom hat made from the free Hedge Witch Hat pattern on my blog:

Too. CUTE.

I plan to go over the pattern once more, then turn this popular design into a downloadable, ad-free PDF! I’m looking to expand my PDF offerings to include more available free patterns, for those that like to the portability and convenience – if there’s one you’d like to see, let me know πŸ™‚

Fundraisers & Giveaways

I’ve recently began offering some of my premium, normally paid-only crochet patterns for FREE as special deals to help people stay safe & sane during this period of self-isolation (which I have begun to call Free Range Captivity). In return, I ask those who can do so to consider making a small donation to a worthy cause.

The first Free Pattern Fundraiser offered the Valkyrie Top gratis in support of The Trevor Project. The offer is ended now, thank you to everyone who supported this important service! Keep reading for the current free offering πŸ™‚

The Valkyrie Top was also part of a recent Instagram Giveaway I participated in, hosted by the incredible Starlily Creations featuring some of my personal favorite crochet artists and heroes. Congratulations to Viv, winner of the deluxe halter top pattern pack!

My next Free Pattern Fundraiser is supporting the National Network to End Domestic Violence – use the code “ENDVIOLENCE” now through Wednesday, April 22 on the Ravelry checkout for the Mermaid Mitts and Sandals pattern and get it for FREE! And if you can, consider donating a small amount (they’ll take any amount, and you can use Paypal) to the worthy cause.

Mermaid Mitts & Sandals

Upcoming Designs

As I sometimes like to do in these rambling wrap-up posts, I have a couple sneak peeks on something that’s coming up soon! This design has been on my mind for years, though I lacked the persistence to do it until recently.

Mysterious, eh? Well, not really. It’s just crochet pineapples, that ubiquitous motif. Or is it?

I may have some tricks up my sleeve!

-MF

Elderberry Pixie Belt & Sale

Hi friends! In addition to working diligently on the Elf Coat patterns, I’ve been having fun doing some experimentation in one of my favorite project categories, the upcycled crochet pixie belt.

If you don’t already know, you can get a ton of info on how to create original, freeform pixie pocket belts from my blog series, the Pixie Belt Tutorial. The full tutorial is also available in downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF format through my Ravelry store – and I’m using this post as a springboard for a pattern sale too!

Now through Aug. 12, through Ravelry only, you can get the Pixie Belt Tutorial pattern FREE with the purchase of any other pattern! πŸ™‚ Just put both patterns in your cart and the discount is taken at checkout.

I had fun adding new hardware elements to this latest pixie belt piece – a metal mandala centerpiece I’ve had for years that came off of an old thrifted dress forms a focal point on the back, plus two D-rings on either side of the belt which hold a draped scarf really nicely for extra oomph around the hips. The best part is that the silver scarf is totally removable, so you can change out scarves!

There are also two pixie pockets: one circular pouch and one drawstring, as well as a detachable mushroom pouch ❀ The skirting I’m especially proud of – one whole thrifted shirt made from dusky rose gauzy material, artfully ripped of course.

I’m very happy with how this belt came out, especially since I got pretty experimental with it! This encourages me in my other ideas – I’d love to bring in more diverse fiber elements like fabric and leather πŸ™‚

Also it was fun to dress up this one – what do you think of my new background? I dig it!

If you’d like the see more unique, one of a kind pixie belt projects, be sure to check out the Pixie Belt Tutorial blog series!

-MF ❀

Vintage Derby Pattern

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I’ve always loved the bowler, a.k.a derby hat, and I think this cute but classy style looks great with anything! So I was inspired to create a crochet version, with a vintage-y feel and body stiff enough to maintain the classic bowler shape. The Vintage Derby pattern is the result, a pretty simple crochet pattern suitable for beginners but with some textural tweaks – this pattern uses waistcoat stitch crochet, a.k.a knit stitch, and yarn held double.

UPDATE!! This pattern is now also available for purchase as a portable, printable, ad-free PDF through my Etsy and Ravelry stores! Buying my paid patterns is a great way to directly support my art and ensure more content from me in the future – thank you! πŸ™‚

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I chose the waistcoat/knit stitch because I wanted the surface of the hat smoother than regular single crochet could do, and because I thought it added to that vintage look I was going for. It’s really more simple than it looks, and I’ve created my own Waistcoat Stitch tutorial including written instructions and video to go along with this pattern!

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For the yarn held double, simply crochet as you would, but with two strands of yarn instead of one – this makes the body nice and thick, which helps hold the shape of the hat.

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If you like this cute springtime accessory as much as I did, consider giving the project page a like on Ravelry!

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Vintage Derby

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Materials:
Yarn: Deborah Norville Everyday (#4 weight, 113g / 203 yds 100% Anti-Pill Acrylic), 2 skeins in “Chinchilla”
50 yds contrasting yarn for the band
5.00 mm hook
Scissors and Tapestry needle

Gauge: 3 sts and 4 rows = 1″ in waistcoat stitch (ws)
Special Stitch: The Waistcoat Stitch (ws) – find the tutorial for this stitch here

Finished measurements: 24″ around (inner brim), 6.5″ height, 1.5″ wide brim

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Notes: Working the waistcoat stitch with double worsted yarn and a 5 hook was not easy at first! I had to consciously adjust my tension so that I was not single crocheting as tight as I normally would. If you are having trouble drawing up loops from the stitch below (through the post area) you will want to adjust your tension to be more loose.

Instructions:

With yarn held double, make a magic ring.

Rnd 1: 5 sc into the ring. Do not join – begin to work in the round, placing marker in the first stitch of every rnd. – 5 sts

Rnd 2: 2 ws in ea of the next 5 sc sts. – 10 sts

Rnd 3: *1 ws in the next st, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 15 sts

Rnd 4: *1 ws in the next 2 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 20 sts

Rnd 5: *1 ws in the next 3 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 25 sts

Rnd 6: *1 ws in the next 4 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 30 sts

Rnd 7: *1 ws in the next 5 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 35 sts

Rnd 8: *1 ws in the next 6 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 40 sts

Rnd 9: *1 ws in the next 7 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 45 sts

Rnd 10: *1 ws in the next 8 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 50 sts

Rnd 11: *1 ws in the next 9 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 55 sts

Rnd 12: *1 ws in the next 10 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 60 sts

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Rnd 13:Β *1 ws in the next 11 sts,Β  2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 65 sts

Rnd 14: 1 ws in each st around. – 65 sts

Rnd 15: *1 ws in the next 12 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 70 sts

Rnd 16: Rpt Rnd 14

Rnd 17: *1 ws in the next 13 sts. 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 75 sts

Rnds 18 – 30: 1 ws in each st around – 75 sts

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Rnd 31: *1 ws in the next 14 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 80 sts

Rnd 32: *1 ws in the next 15 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 85 sts

Rnd 33: *1 ws in the next 16 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 90 sts

Rnd 34: *1 ws in the next 17 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 95 sts

Rnd 35: *1 ws in the next 18 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 100 sts

Rnd 36: *1 ws in the next 19 sts, 2 ws in the next st. Repeat from * 5 times total. – 105 sts

Rnds 37 – 42: 1 ws in ea st around. – 105 sts

Slip stitch a few extra stitches at the end of the last round. Cut yarn and tie off.

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Reverse the hat and reattach the yarn, held double, on the last rowΒ  on the opposite side. Slip stitch in each stitch around on the inside of the brim – this helps neaten the brim and keep it sturdy. Cut yarn and tie off again when finished.

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Weave in all ends using the tapestry needle.

Hat Band:

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Using the 5.00 mm hook and the contrasting yarn held double, ch 75.

Rnd 1: Join chain in a ring, being careful not to twist the chain. Sc in each ch stitch around. Join with a slip stitch to the first st of the round.- 75 sts

Rnd 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first st). Ws in the first st. 1 ws in each st around. Join with a sl st. – 75 sts

Rnd 3: Repeat Rnd 2. Cut yarn, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Weave in the spare end, then thread the tapestry needle with the long end and use it to sew the band onto the hat. If you would rather not attach the band, it should stay pretty secure anyway – your call!

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It was fun dreaming up a vintagey look to match the hat – but next time I will do the photoshoot BEFORE I dig out a bunch of plants from a garden bed in the hot sun, lol!

This little pattern was so much fun, I was reminded of how much I love making hats! I do have a DOOZY cooked up as an idea for the future, but I haven’t put hook to yarn on that yet – stick around and see more by following my blog or following my Facebook page!

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If you like funky hats, you should check out my FREE horned monstrosity, the Krampus Hat Pattern.

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If vintage and steampunk-y is your style, maybe you’d like some Ruffled Wrister gloves to match your hat? That one’s also free!

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❀ – MF

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Pixie Belt PDF

Just popping in for a quick reminder that my Pixie Pocket Belt tutorial is now available in downloadable, portable, printable, ad-free form! Head over to my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Pattern Store to get it ❀ ❀ ❀ Thanks for visiting and supporting – the free version is still available on my blog in this series of posts, but PDF’s are more convenient and accessible – plus I get yarn money which allows me to make more patterns and tutorials!

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I also have the most recently finished pixie belt, “Dogwood” to share. I made this one for me, since I didn’t have my own yet. My favorite colors, plus some extra slip stitch fanciness, resin cabochon details, and even a leather and crochet pocket.

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I loved crocheting on the leather and plan to do more – and maybe even make some tutorials for it! πŸ˜‰

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I especially enjoy the deer antler button fastenings and the adjustable ribbon tie combo – so there are multiple ways to wear this. I’d have to say these are in the running for my #1 favorite crochet project to make, I hope you love them as much as I do!

-MF

PBT: Cell Phone Pocket

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit theΒ Intro page.

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I often like to leave my technology behind when I go wandering in the forest, but hey, sometime’s a pixie’s gotta stay connected. That’s why I named this special pocket style the Cell Phone pocket, because it’s the perfect addition to a crochet utility belt that needs room for a phone!

Of course, this in-the-round style rectangular pouch is just really fun and simple to make on its own, so no tech required if you prefer to stow other treasures inside πŸ™‚

Cell Phone Pocket

3.75 mm Hook
Ch 12 (or the length you think will fit your phone, plus a little extra – you don’t want it too tight)
1. Hdc in 3rd ch from the hook and in ea st down the chain. 3 hdc in the final ch st. Rotate the piece, then hdc in each ch stitch (inserting hk into bottom loop). Work 2 hdc in the final ch st. Join with a slip stitch

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2. Ch 2 (does not count as first hdc) hdc in ea hdc, across, working 3 hdc in the central hdc of the 3-hdc turn at the end. Hdc across again, work 3 hdc in the central stitch of the previous 3-hdc turn at the end. Join with a sl st

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Check to see if this will comfortably fit your phone. If not, add another round with increases at both ends. If it’s lookin’ good, just work rounds evenly without increases.

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Don’t look at how dirty my phone is.

3. Hdc even for as many rounds as necessary.

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I did about 13, then added a roomy loop so that it can secure my phone by catching on a button which I planned to add to the front. Pretty sweet right? Weave in all your ends, then stash this baby with the rest of your pockets until you’re ready to add them on!

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I hope you enjoyed this little bonus round of the Pixie Belt Tutorial! I loved making this belt especially because THIS one’s for me πŸ˜‰ I’ve never made myself one before so I thought it was high time ❀

-MF

 

PBT: One Piece Circular Pocket

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit theΒ Intro page.

One Piece Circular Pocket

Most of the crochet utility belts I make have circle pockets – I love their potential as a canvas for other shapes like mandalas, simple embroidery, or shell flower petals. Plus, I’m just really into circles.

While I’ve created a tutorial for circle pockets that utilize two flat circle shapes sewn together, I often prefer to create them in a single piece – this tutorial shows how!

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Begin by working a colorful, non-continuous circle as shown in this section of the tutorial series.Β Shown here is my version for the belt I’ve been working on, “Dogwood”.

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As you can see, I’ve got some crazy stuff going on in there, including some overlay stitches and textural bobbles, plus a resin cabochon that I appliqued on with a crochet cover. But the basic structure is the same, using regular increases to make a flat circle and going up to 60 or so stitches, which means following in pattern until you Inc on 10 (see Circle Pockets Part 1 for more on creating flat circles).

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Once I reach my desired size, I prepare to shape the circle. To do this, I’m going to add a few rows of sc even in the round, meaning I’ll just crochet around the circle without adding any increases or working any joins. This will add depth to your circle so that the pocket is rounded and not flat. BUT, you have to keep in mind you’ll need an opening in your pocket, so at some point you’ll chain a number (I think I did around 13-15) and skip the same number of stitches before continuing to crochet.

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On the next round, single crochet right over the chain as normal. Now you have the opening worked out, so you will work a few more rounds of sc even, then begin to decrease at the same rate that you increased in the front.

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If you plan on adding a button fastening, don’t forget to crochet either a loop or a buttonhole into one of the rounds behind the opening on the back of your pocket! I almost forgot, which is why my loop is larger and set further back πŸ˜‰

Since my pocket went up to “Inc on 10” I’ll start shaping the back of my pocket by decreasing on 10, using the same counting strategy as the increases:

Dec on 10 (or count out 9 stitches, then use the 10th and 11th sts to work a sc decrease)
Dec on 9 (count out 8 sts, use the 9th and 10th sts to dec)
Dec on 8 (etc…)

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The back of the circle pocket will start to close up. When you can’t decrease anymore, you’ll need to cut a long yarn tail and tie off your stitches. Thread the yarn tail on a tapestry needle and secure the closing circle by stitching through it back and forth a few times.

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Weave in all your ends, and sew on a button or fastening, beads, or anything you like!

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Hope you enjoyed this little bonus edition of the Pixie Belt Tutorial – keep sending me pictures because I love seeing what you make! Hit me up on my Facebook page:
Morale Fiber on Facebook

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-MF