Pixie Belt PDF

Just popping in for a quick reminder that my Pixie Pocket Belt tutorial is now available in downloadable, portable, printable, ad-free form! Head over to my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Pattern Store to get it ❤ ❤ ❤ Thanks for visiting and supporting – the free version is still available on my blog in this series of posts, but PDF’s are more convenient and accessible – plus I get yarn money which allows me to make more patterns and tutorials!

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I also have the most recently finished pixie belt, “Dogwood” to share. I made this one for me, since I didn’t have my own yet. My favorite colors, plus some extra slip stitch fanciness, resin cabochon details, and even a leather and crochet pocket.

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I loved crocheting on the leather and plan to do more – and maybe even make some tutorials for it! 😉

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I especially enjoy the deer antler button fastenings and the adjustable ribbon tie combo – so there are multiple ways to wear this. I’d have to say these are in the running for my #1 favorite crochet project to make, I hope you love them as much as I do!

-MF

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PBT: Triangles

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

Today’s task is: Triangles! I don’t personally use this shape much in my belts, but I have seen others do beautiful pixie belts with triangles featured. Speaking of inspiration, have I mentioned I’ve been creating a special Pinterest subsection on my crochet board just for pixie pocket belts? I have, and you should follow me. Anyway, here’s triangles!

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Triangle shapes can be worked either in-the-round, where you crochet your rows in a circular direction and join them before starting a new row (using increases to create points), or in regular rows, where you chain and turn to work the opposite direction after every row (this method uses decreases to shape the piece if working from the base of the shape).

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The square pocket on “Hickory” uses back-and-forth rows with decreases placed at each end of every row to shape the triangle portion.

I personally prefer the in-the-round triangle for decorative applications, because it keeps the right side facing the entire time, which to me looks prettier. I have an in-depth photo-tutorial on in-the-round triangles in my Basic Bralette free crochet pattern, so I’ll not go over the entire thing here – please refer to that tutorial for more info! And of course, I’m using bits and scraps, so I’ll change colors every row or so.

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Pattern for in-the-round Triangle:

MR (Make Ring)

Rnd 1: Ch 2 (does not count as first st), (3 dc into the ring, ch 2) 3 times. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 9 dc

Rnd 2: Ch 2, 1 dc into the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) repeat within parentheses twice. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 21 dc

Rnd 3: Ch 2, 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 dc. In the next space, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. (1 dc in ea of the next 7 dc. In the next sp work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) rpt within parentheses twice. 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc. Join with a sl st to the first dc. – 33 dc

(shorthand version from here on – just continue the established pattern until your triangle is the desired size!)

Rnd 4: 11 dc, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] in next space – rpt around

Rnd 5: 15 dc, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] in next space – rpt around

Etc.

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I want to make my triangle just big enough for one side to match the top of my rectangle pocket – see where I’m going with this?

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So, after I’m done, I’ll  slip stitch through the top row of the triangle and the top row of the rectangle simultaneously to join them – doesn’t matter if you don’t have exactly the matching amount of stitches, ‘cause its fReEfOrM baby! So fudging it is okay. Encouraged even.

Once that’s complete, I weave in all the ends. Now I have a rectangle pocket with a cute pointed flap to cover the top. Let’s get even fancier – or as the kids these days say, extra – by using that ruffle technology I talked about earlier in the series.

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With some handspun orange wool, I attach with a sl st a few stitches down the side of the pocket. Using a gradation of stitch heights and working about 2-3 stitches per every stitch worked into, I make a funky ruffle down the side of the pocket, ending in a couple chain stitches before fastening off. Let’s go nuts and slip a bead on there, too. And some extra yarn bits for tassel.

Then, begin on the other side (working in the opposite direction if you want the right side to be facing) and do the other side to match. Now we’re talking.

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Another word on inspiration here : this is why it’s fun for me to choose a theme for these pieces, which are always nature-based for me.  What made me decide to add that crazy ruffle? Well, for one thing, I had just a bit of that thick wool orange yarn, and bulky handspun makes great funky accent choice. But more than that, I was thinking about the Maple tree, and the way the brightly colored leaves curl as they slowly dry. The pockets so far had bright fall-like colors, but the lines were so straightforward – circle, square, rectangle – that I needed a bit of crazy curl in the pockets to kind of represent that thought of the curly maple leaf. I wasn’t going for an exact replica of the curly leaf, just a touch of the spirit of the leaf. Does that sound crazy? Good. Because this is some artistic pixie magic we’re doing. Save the logic for the office.

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In the next few posts we’ll be tackling circular pockets – stay tuned!

-MF

PBT: Square Pockets

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This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt – to read more about this series visit the Intro page.

When it comes to pouches, a square or rectangle pocket is about as easy as you can get. Squares and rectangles are just rows, back and forth, and if you can crochet you’re probably already familiar with them. Then of course there’s granny squares, which are a whole other business, but they can also be really fun in these belts. If you want a tutorial on making granny squares, check the “Part 2 Instructions” crochet portion of this free pattern on my blog.

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Here I’m just going to crochet a rectangle, then fold it in half and seam it up the sides to make a square envelope pouch. I might add fancier stuff later, but for now concentrate on the rectangle.

To start a row for a rectangle or square, chain the length you want, then chain a few extra depending on what size stitch you are making – chain 0 extra for sc (the last ch counts as your first st), chain 1 extra for hdc (the last 2 ch count as your first st), chain 2 extra for dc (the last 3 ch count as your first st) etc.

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Then, work your rows back and forth, chaining as many as necessary for the turns (1 for sc, 2 for hdc, 3 for dc, etc) – until you have a square or rectangle. Easy! I made mine a little more textured and interesting by using rows of linked half-double crochet instead of regular hdc. You can find more info on linked stitches on my free Linked Double Crochet tutorial.

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Linking stitches creates a subtle & pretty texture as well as a sturdier fabric than regular crochet.

Fold over the piece, then use crochet stitching to work through both layers at once to seam them together. Alternatively, you could thread a yarn needle with some yarn and whip stitch them together sewing-style, but I prefer the stitch method. Here I’m going to use single crochet to seam the pieces together, because I’ve decided I’m going to come back and add a funky edging later, and I’ll need something to work into easily.

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The general rule for crocheting into the edges of rows is that you’ll want as many stitches per row edge as there are chains in the turning chain for your stitch height – so for single crochet, the turning chain is 1, and you’d make 1 stitch per row edge. For hdc, the turning chain is 2, so you’d want two stitches per row edge. Keep in mind this is a GENERAL rule and it’s going to depend on your gauge and other factors – for instance, I sometimes only make 2 stitches per row side on double crochet rows, if it works better for the specific situation.

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Anyway, seam that puppy up whatever way you feel like. Weave in your ends, and you’re done! Easy pouch. Now to make it more interesting, see the next post.

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-MF

 

Tunisian Crochet Fantasy Hood

Crochet Pixie Hat / Hood

Folk tales and children’s stories seem to have stayed with us, at least here in the USA, long past our breaking into adulthood. Fantasy and Sci-Fi especially draw from narratives we learned when we were still in short pants, even shows that blur the line between speculative fiction and realistic fiction, like the popular Once Upon A Time, or the many many YA / adult books and shows featuring vampires or werewolves. It seems contradictory, our obsession with stories meant for children, and yet these stories were probably originally told for the adults the children were going to grow up to be. And with their themes of threatening darkness and treacherous paths into the woods, maybe we need them more now than ever… if only to help us realize that the scariest thing in the woods is probably us.

One of my favorites themes from folk tales is Little Red Riding Hood, particularly more modern versions where Miss Hood is less innocent than originally portrayed. There’s tons of awesome art to be found in this vein, like on this page and this one.

I promise there’s a yarn-related payoff to punctuate my mytho-philosophical rambling.

Elf and Pixie hats from 2012 -

Elf and Pixie hats from 2012 – “Snowy Owl,” “Skittle Puke,” and “Hunter.”

I became slightly obsessed with “elf hats,” as I called them (usually called a stocking cap, I think), back in 2011 and 2012, those long pointy caps capturing my imagination and bringing to mind all those faerie stories I love so much. I crocheted at least ten of them, selling most of them and gifting a few (and making one for myself) before moving on to the next obsession. Now I’ve come back around to them again with the “pixie hood” style that can be seen all over the crochet and knit world at the moment – though I favor the longer, more dramatic point that’s akin to the elf hats of yore.

So with my new refiguring of the elfy, pixie, faerie-y hat I bring you the Tunisian Crochet Fantasy Hood, Little Red style.

Update: There is now a newer, longer, more deluxe version of this pattern for available for purchase. It uses a 6.5 tunisian hook and worsted weight yarn (with art yarn or faux fur yarn trim) and includes detailed phototutorials and written instructions – see my post on the Trickster Hood for more details!

Pixie Hood - Tunisian Crochet Fantasy Hood

Tunisian Fantasy Hood

Size “H” Tunisian Hook

3 skeins Patons Classic Wool Roving (120 yds, 100g/3.5 oz, #5 Bulky weight, color shown is Cherry)

1 1” button

Tapestry or Yarn Needle

Stitch Markers

Gauge: Make gauge swatch 10 sts and 10 rows in Tunisian simple stitch. 1” = 4 sts

For help with increasing in Tunisian Simple Stitch, please refer to my tutorial post on increasing and decreasing in this stitch pattern.

To start, Ch 3, leaving a long tail for stitching later.

Increase Rows:

Row 1: Insert hk in the 2nd ch from the hk, draw up a loop. Insert hk in the next ch, draw up a lp.
Row 2: Yo, draw through 1 lp. *yo, draw through 2 lps* rpt to end.
Row 3: Ch 1, insert hk in between first two vertical loops/bars, draw up a loop (1 inc made). *insert hk under next vertical lp, draw up a lp* rpt until 1 stitch remains. Insert hk between last vertical bar worked and last remaining vertical bar, draw up a lp (1 inc made). Insert hk into last remaining vertical bar, draw up a lp.
Row 4: Rpt Row 2.

Repeat rows three and four 45 more times, or until the working row (the top) of your triangle measures about 28 inches in width.
Place a marker on either end of the working row.

Straight Rows:
Row 1: Ch 1, *insert hk into next vertical loop and draw up a lp* repeat to end.
Row 2: Yo, draw through 1 lp *yo, draw through 2 lps* rpt to end.

Repeat rows one and two 26 more times, or until the section from your working row to your markers measures 8 inches in height. Do not cut yarn.

Ch 1. With RS facing, insert hook in the last bar worked and draw up a loop. Yarn over and draw through both loops on the hook (first Double Chain stitch made). Work 8 more double chain stitches, attach with a sl st to the base of your double chain, forming a loop. Cut yarn and finish off.

On the opposite end of the hood edge, cut a length of yarn or thread and fasten on the 1” button.

Thread the long tail from your beginning chain through a yarn or tapestry needle. Folding the hood in half lengthwise, sew the edges of the point together using a whip stitch. Stop stitching and weave in your ends once you reach the point where the increase rows end.

Weave in all ends.

This pattern is intellectual property of me, Morale Fiber. Please don’t reproduce it in any way without permission of the author. Feel free to sell items made from this pattern, just please link back to me if you do!

This hood would be lovely in any yarn really, not just the yarn shown here! That’s why I gave the pattern measurements as well as the row counts, in case you want to try it with a different weight of yarn. I myself am likely to make some more. If you have any questions or thoughts about this pattern, please don’t hesitate to comment here.

Pixie Hood / Crochet hat

Safe journeys through the woods, friends.
-MF