Elderberry Pixie Belt & Sale

Hi friends! In addition to working diligently on the Elf Coat patterns, I’ve been having fun doing some experimentation in one of my favorite project categories, the upcycled crochet pixie belt.

If you don’t already know, you can get a ton of info on how to create original, freeform pixie pocket belts from my blog series, the Pixie Belt Tutorial. The full tutorial is also available in downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF format through my Ravelry store – and I’m using this post as a springboard for a pattern sale too!

Now through Aug. 12, through Ravelry only, you can get the Pixie Belt Tutorial pattern FREE with the purchase of any other pattern! ๐Ÿ™‚ Just put both patterns in your cart and the discount is taken at checkout.

I had fun adding new hardware elements to this latest pixie belt piece – a metal mandala centerpiece I’ve had for years that came off of an old thrifted dress forms a focal point on the back, plus two D-rings on either side of the belt which hold a draped scarf really nicely for extra oomph around the hips. The best part is that the silver scarf is totally removable, so you can change out scarves!

There are also two pixie pockets: one circular pouch and one drawstring, as well as a detachable mushroom pouch โค The skirting I’m especially proud of – one whole thrifted shirt made from dusky rose gauzy material, artfully ripped of course.

I’m very happy with how this belt came out, especially since I got pretty experimental with it! This encourages me in my other ideas – I’d love to bring in more diverse fiber elements like fabric and leather ๐Ÿ™‚

Also it was fun to dress up this one – what do you think of my new background? I dig it!

If you’d like the see more unique, one of a kind pixie belt projects, be sure to check out the Pixie Belt Tutorial blog series!

-MF โค

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Pixie Belt PDF

Just popping in for a quick reminder that my Pixie Pocket Belt tutorial is now available in downloadable, portable, printable, ad-free form! Head over to my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Pattern Store to get it โค โค โค Thanks for visiting and supporting – the free version is still available on my blog in this series of posts, but PDF’s are more convenient and accessible – plus I get yarn money which allows me to make more patterns and tutorials!

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I also have the most recently finished pixie belt, “Dogwood” to share. I made this one for me, since I didn’t have my own yet. My favorite colors, plus some extra slip stitch fanciness, resin cabochon details, and even a leather and crochet pocket.

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I loved crocheting on the leather and plan to do more – and maybe even make some tutorials for it! ๐Ÿ˜‰

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I especially enjoy the deer antler button fastenings and the adjustable ribbon tie combo – so there are multiple ways to wear this. I’d have to say these are in the running for my #1 favorite crochet project to make, I hope you love them as much as I do!

-MF

PBT: Cell Phone Pocket

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt โ€“ to read more about this series visit theย Intro page.

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I often like to leave my technology behind when I go wandering in the forest, but hey, sometime’s a pixie’s gotta stay connected. That’s why I named this special pocket style the Cell Phone pocket, because it’s the perfect addition to a crochet utility belt that needs room for a phone!

Of course, this in-the-round style rectangular pouch is just really fun and simple to make on its own, so no tech required if you prefer to stow other treasures inside ๐Ÿ™‚

Cell Phone Pocket

3.75 mm Hook
Ch 12 (or the length you think will fit your phone, plus a little extra – you don’t want it too tight)
1. Hdc in 3rd ch from the hook and in ea st down the chain. 3 hdc in the final ch st. Rotate the piece, then hdc in each ch stitch (inserting hk into bottom loop). Work 2 hdc in the final ch st. Join with a slip stitch

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2. Ch 2 (does not count as first hdc) hdc in ea hdc, across, working 3 hdc in the central hdc of the 3-hdc turn at the end. Hdc across again, work 3 hdc in the central stitch of the previous 3-hdc turn at the end. Join with a sl st

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Check to see if this will comfortably fit your phone. If not, add another round with increases at both ends. If it’s lookin’ good, just work rounds evenly without increases.

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Don’t look at how dirty my phone is.

3. Hdc even for as many rounds as necessary.

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I did about 13, then added a roomy loop so that it can secure my phone by catching on a button which I planned to add to the front. Pretty sweet right? Weave in all your ends, then stash this baby with the rest of your pockets until you’re ready to add them on!

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I hope you enjoyed this little bonus round of the Pixie Belt Tutorial! I loved making this belt especially because THIS one’s for me ๐Ÿ˜‰ I’ve never made myself one before so I thought it was high time โค

-MF

 

PBT: One Piece Circular Pocket

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt โ€“ to read more about this series visit theย Intro page.

One Piece Circular Pocket

Most of the crochet utility belts I make have circle pockets โ€“ I love their potential as a canvas for other shapes like mandalas, simple embroidery, or shell flower petals. Plus, Iโ€™m just really into circles.

While I’ve created a tutorial for circle pockets that utilize two flat circle shapes sewn together, I often prefer to create them in a single piece – this tutorial shows how!

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Begin by working a colorful, non-continuous circle as shown in this section of the tutorial series.ย Shown here is my version for the belt I’ve been working on, “Dogwood”.

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As you can see, I’ve got some crazy stuff going on in there, including some overlay stitches and textural bobbles, plus a resin cabochon that I appliqued on with a crochet cover. But the basic structure is the same, using regular increases to make a flat circle and going up to 60 or so stitches, which means following in pattern until you Inc on 10 (see Circle Pockets Part 1 for more on creating flat circles).

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Once I reach my desired size, I prepare to shape the circle. To do this, I’m going to add a few rows of sc even in the round, meaning I’ll just crochet around the circle without adding any increases or working any joins. This will add depth to your circle so that the pocket is rounded and not flat. BUT, you have to keep in mind you’ll need an opening in your pocket, so at some point you’ll chain a number (I think I did around 13-15) and skip the same number of stitches before continuing to crochet.

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On the next round, single crochet right over the chain as normal. Now you have the opening worked out, so you will work a few more rounds of sc even, then begin to decrease at the same rate that you increased in the front.

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If you plan on adding a button fastening, don’t forget to crochet either a loop or a buttonhole into one of the rounds behind the opening on the back of your pocket! I almost forgot, which is why my loop is larger and set further back ๐Ÿ˜‰

Since my pocket went up to “Inc on 10” I’ll start shaping the back of my pocket by decreasing on 10, using the same counting strategy as the increases:

Dec on 10 (or count out 9 stitches, then use the 10th and 11th sts to work a sc decrease)
Dec on 9 (count out 8 sts, use the 9th and 10th sts to dec)
Dec on 8 (etc…)

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The back of the circle pocket will start to close up. When you can’t decrease anymore, you’ll need to cut a long yarn tail and tie off your stitches. Thread the yarn tail on a tapestry needle and secure the closing circle by stitching through it back and forth a few times.

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Weave in all your ends, and sew on a button or fastening, beads, or anything you like!

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Hope you enjoyed this little bonus edition of the Pixie Belt Tutorial – keep sending me pictures because I love seeing what you make! Hit me up on my Facebook page:
Morale Fiber on Facebook

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-MF

 

PBT: Wrap-Up

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This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt โ€“ to read more about this series visit theย Intro page.

Maybe it’s just because I worked on the tutorial for this so much, but this newest pixie pocket belt may be my favorite ever. To be fair though, I do say that almost every time I make a new one of these.

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That’s because every one of them turns out to be totally unique – I start out with a pile of scrap materials, and then let it be what it becomes along the way. This one became “Maple” named of course after the tree. I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial series – I certainly did – and I’d love to see what is being made from this guide!

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This pattern tutorial series is now listed on Ravelry – hook up your projects so I can see what you made, or look through other projects for inspirationย  ๐Ÿ˜‰

And now for more pictures and ramblings.

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I especially love these to dance in, since the fabric fringe catches movement so well!

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Fun side story – the flower headpiece I am wearing in this photo is one I made years ago, a long strand of curlicues (just like the ones talked about earlier in the tutorial series) with scrap yarn flowers that made as I was traveling across the U.S.

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Of course, the utility belt function of this project is super handy if you are the festival-going type, since these pixie belts are not only cute and go over anything, but also hold your necessaries!

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I’m pretty happy with how the faux-bustle back came out – its not something I’d ever really tried before. That’s another thing I love about these projects – pure experimentation is necessary, not just encouraged.

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I’m a little sad to be closing out the pixie belt tutorial actually, so I’ve had a thought – perhaps more pocket patterns in the future? What do you think?

As always, don’t hesitate to ask any questions or leave any comments! I love hearing from you โค

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-MF

 

 

 

PBT: Fabric Fringe Skirt

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt โ€“ to read more about this series visit theย Intro page.

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Okay, we’re all done with the crochet process now, so it’s time to move on to one of the most *satisfying* portions of the process: the ragtag fabric scrap fringe skirt! Why is it so satisfying? Well, because you get to rip stuff up. Rip rip rip.

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Here I have the fabrics I selected during the process of selecting my materials – a couple of thrift store silk shirts and some soft rayon jersey knit that formed the lining of one of the shirts. I use my scissors to separate large chunks of fabric away from the bulky seams, then once I have a piece isolated, I start ripping!

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Using my fabric scissors, I cut out small tabs on the edge of the piece of fabric. Then…

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….I grab a tab and rip straight across to get a strip of fabric. RIIIIIIP!

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That’s all there is to it, really. I keep ripping until I have a nice little pile of strips. Beware, there will be a lot of stray threads involved in the ripping process. This is normal.

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So here I have a nice pile from this silk piece. They are different sizes, because I’m using upcycled clothing, so the pieces I’m ripping from are not uniform in size or shape. I’ll sort it out later.

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I’ve also decided to use the jersey knit lining from the same upcycled shirt. Since you can’t rip knit, (or stretch velvet, another favorite fabric of mine to use in these projects) I just use a rotary blade to open up the shirt and cut long strips.

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Add ’em to the pile!

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I also discovered this gold colored silk button-down in my stash at some point and added it to my material pile – I thought it would be good to add depth to the color scheme. Rip rip rip!

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Okay, that’s a pretty good sized pile. It’s not all of my material, but I can always cut more if I need to. Time to apply them to the belt. First, though, one side of my belt doesn’t have a tie – so I am going to use the netted ribbon yarn for that. One good long length doubled over, then looped through the end of the belt, makes a nice tie. Additionally, the netted nature of the ribbon yarn can easily hook over any buttons placed on the belt, giving you more options for how to secure it around the waist.

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Now, the fringe! I lay out all of my strips – since I am making a bustle-style back for this belt, I want to utilize my longest strips in the back middle, and put the shorter ones toward the front edges. So I organize my strips into piles according to size – long, medium, short. Then, take each strip and double it over.

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Using a large-ish hook, draw the loop at the end of the double strip through a chain-loop opening on the edge of the belt. You can also draw these directly through the stitches, or really wherever you want. FrEeForM!!

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Draw the ends through the loop and tighten to create the fringe. Do this all across the belt, or anwhere you want your fabric fringe to be. I go through and add this layer of fabric on just the edge loops, going according to size as I mentioned earlier.

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Once all of the loops on the very bottom have been fringed, I flip the belt over and work from the back side for a bit, hooking fringe into the middle layer of loops.

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Again, there’s really not a wrong way to do this. You can fringe all from the front, or all from the back, or just do one layer, or do so many layers you can’t even see the mesh portion. That last one is what I’m aiming for.

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So I attach my strips just about anywhere they will fit.

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Then, flip it back over, and attach on the top portion of the mesh on the right side!

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Hm, needs just one final touch I think – so I attach just a few strands of a small ball of silky eyelash yarn I have in my materials pile.

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That’s the stuff. And now, I’m seriously done! I am so thrilled about the way this turned out, and also being able to share this creative process here on the blog ๐Ÿ™‚ But I do have one more post in this series: the Wrap-Up! Check it out and don’t forget to show me what you’ve made!

Meanwhile, here’s more examples of fringe skirts from other belts I’ve done:

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“Mulberry” used strips of cut stretch velveteen. It also featured a mushroom pouch on it’s own loop, which can be worn around the neck as well. I didn’t include that type of pocket in this tutorial because I already have a mushroom pouch free pattern available!

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“Shepherd’s Purse” used only ripped cotton weave fabrics, like gauze and muslin.

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Instead of ripped fabric, the skirt for “Nightshade” is that netted ribbon yarn, all stretched out to make a frilly fringe.

-MF

 

PBT: Attaching the Pockets

This post is part of a series of tutorials on how to create your own unique crochet pixie pocket belt โ€“ to read more about this series visit theย Intro page.

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So far we’ve covered basic shapes in the form of pockets such as circles, squares & rectangles, triangles, and cones – now it’s time to take all the pockets and attach them to the belt base using slip stitch crochet. Like the rest of this project, there is no strictly “right” way to do this, but I’ve included lots of process photos to show how I manage this part.

I prefer the look of pockets mounted directly onto the belt, with the backs up against the belt itself. I also always double-mount my pockets, using two lines of slip stitching, one at the top and one in the middle, to attach the pockets to the belt base. This is not absolutely necessary if you want to skip the second mount (the middle mount is the trickiest part of this) but it does make them really sturdy.ย  I have seen my festival friends put these things through the wringer with use โ€“ and they hold up!

If you need more inspiration on the ways you can assemble the belt, remember to check out my Pinterest board featuring crochet utility belts!

Attaching the Pockets to the Belt

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To begin the final stage of crochet for the pocket belt, lay out your belt base and grab all of your completed pockets. Decide how to place the pockets, arranging them along the belt base in whatever manner strikes your fancy โ€“ I like the pockets to sit near the ends, but sometimes they are all over the place. Here, because Iโ€™m featuring a bustle back, I keep them corralled near the ends so as not to cover the back of the skirt.

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The first step is to get a yarn and start slip stitching across the top of the belt base. I am using a really textured yarn for this part, just to add a little extra crazy.

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Here, Iโ€™m just slip stitching across the top of the belt until I get to a place where Iโ€™d like to put a pocket. Keep slip stitching, but now work through two layers โ€“ the top edge of the pocket (the back part only, since you donโ€™t want to stitch the pocket closed) and the top edge of the belt base.

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This is the first attachment. Keep slip stitching until you want to place another pocket.

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Then, slip stitch across the pocket and belt simultaneously again.

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For drawstring pockets like this one, make sure you leave enough pocket unattached for it to be able to close nicely.

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Keep slip stitching and attaching pockets until you reach the opposite end of the belt.

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For the envelope-style pocket, I decide to make the slip stitch attaching underneath the top flap – so I open it up and stitch through the pocket layer and the belt layer underneath.

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At the end, I rotate and work one row of the side of the belt base, then rotate again and start to slip stitch across the middle of the belt, placing my stitches in between the double crochets that make up the middle row.

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Attaching in the middle can require some really creative maneuvering on the part of the hook-wielder. In fact, this part is more like guerilla fiber-punk yarn wrestling. So be prepared for that! ๐Ÿ˜€

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To work the second row of attaching, slip stitch until you reach a pocket. With the back of the pocket facing you, insert your hook into the stitching and back out on the other side of a single stitch, catching the post of the stitch with your hook.

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Then, insert the hook through the middle of the belt. Yarn over and draw this loop through the belt, the post of the pocket stitching, and the loop on your hook, making one slip stitch through two layers.

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Continue this process for at least part of the back of the pocket. When youโ€™ve attached enough of the back of the pocket, keep slip stitching through just the belt layer as normal until you reach the next pocket, then work through both layers in the same manner again.

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Here you can see the back of the slip stitching of the second row on the inside of a pocket – just enough to hold them down and make sure they are extra secure.

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The pockets are now attached!

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After working the second round of attaching, I like to do one more row of slip stitching into the same stitches across the top of the belt, just for extra firmness (to reduce yarn stretching on the belt base) and to add more color and depth. Here Iโ€™ll change colors, then just work a simple line of slip stitching all the way across, right next to the first line of slip stitches (or wherever… FREEFORM!!)

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After this last finishing touch, I’m DONE with the crochet portion of the belt! Time to weave in my ends, then tackle the final step: the fabric fringe skirt. After that post, I’ll do a final reveal and wrap-up – I can’t wait to show the final product ๐Ÿ™‚

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-MF