T-Shirt Rug Tutorial

Here’s another project that fits firmly into the “tired of staring at it because it’s been sitting on my desk for over a year so I might as well finish it” category!

StonesonSand2

There’s no real reason that it took me so long to finish, other than I got continuously distracted by other projects and lost my momentum on it. It was the fourth crocheted t-shirt rug from this series that I posted a while ago, in which I allude to the method but don’t provide much of an explanation. Today I am remedying that!

But FIRST! Here’s how to make T-shirt yarn via Endlessly Inspired.

I got the idea of using yarn to crochet around the t-shirt strips from Pinterest (of course) but felt that I could make things a little more interesting by experimenting with stitch designs..
MerryPrankster2…. which was fun, but sometimes one desires a more mindless exercise. So I experimented with ducking the t-shirt yarn strip in front of and behind the stitch, and came up with a design that makes the strip form  eye-pleasing rings of bobbles or nubs, or in the case of my most recent rug, stones on sand.

StonesonSand5

Crocheting around the T-shirt yarn in this way is soooooo much easier, neater-looking, and more economical  than trying the crochet the t-shirt yarn itself. I always make my own t-shirt yarn, so it’s also better because it’s easy to switch from one ball to another with this method. So enough talk… how is it done?

Crocheted T-shirt Rug How-To

DSCN4267

You need:

A large amount of cotton or acrylic yarn (A skein of Caron One Pound usually gets the job done nicely, with some to spare)

T-shirt Yarn (I use home-made, but store bought works too!)

A 6.00 mm hook

Start by making a magic ring. 6 sc into the ring tightly. Sc into the first sc of the first round to begin a joinless, in-the-round crochet circle. *

*I will not be giving instructions for increases in the round because I’m making the assumption that the crocheter already knows how to handle this – just work them in the same proportion as you usually would or decide how many you need to keep it flat as you go. 

In the second round of stitching, hold the t-shirt yarn flat against the last row and start to stitch the single crochet over the tail of this yarn until you have worked 3-5 stitches or have anchored it securely. Once you have secured the t-shirt yarn, you will begin weaving it in and out of the sc stitches.

DSCN4483

This isn’t a picture of the second round, but you can see where I have begun the new strip by anchoring it within the sc stitching before I start weaving it in and out.

Continuing to work in the round (and adding increases where necessary), hold the t-shirt yarn to the back of your work and work a sc in the next stitch. Keep in mind that the t-shirt yarn should be completely to the back of the work so that the yarn is not held within the stitch at all.

*Tightening the sc after working it by holding the loop steady and pulling on your working yarn makes the rug nice and firm and helps the t-shirt yarn bobbles look neat.

Before you work the next stitch, bring the t-shirt yarn completely to the front of the work, so that you are working your next sc behind the t-shirt strand.

DSCN4490

Work the next sc, tighten it down if necessary, then return the t-shirt strand to the back of the work – this will wrap the t-shirt yarn around the stitch you just made, creating a little t-shirt bobble.

With the t-shirt yarn at the back, make another sc in the next stitch.

DSCN4493

Continue alternating holding the t-shirt yarn in front or back, until you get near the end of the strand or decide to change colors. Return the t-shirt yarn to the top of your work and work a series of several sc stitches OVER the yarn, so that it is trapped in the stitch again. Do this until the end is reached, then begin the next strand the same way.

I like to vary the proportion of bobbles in the front (i.e – bring the t-shirt yarn to the front every two stitches, every three stitches, etc) to provide visual interest, or alternate rounds of bobbles with rounds of t-shirt yarn carried along inside openwork stitches.

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T-shirt yarn carried inside openwork stitches (granny blocks in this case)

As I’ve mentioned before, carrying T-shirt yarn along while you crochet regular yarn is a lot easier on your hands than trying to crochet the t-shirt yarn itself!  And this way, there’s tons of variations you can try.

My rugs usually end up being somewhere between 32-45″, for use as small accent rugs or even table centerpieces (and if you use all cotton materials, really awesome hotpads are possible!)  Lately, I’ve been thinking more about making them specifically for use as djembe rugs for the drum-circle going type! This of course has nothing to do with the djembe I recently purchased after a drumming workshop.

StonesonSand4

Ain’t she pretty?

StonesonSand3

Typical. I finally finish a project that I’ve been dragging my feet on, and I immediately want to start another.

-MF

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The Best Crochet Washcloth

Crochet Washcloth 1

I’ve really been on a cotton kick because of the warm weather (and because cotton is great, as illustrated before), and I was all pumped up ready to do a blog post on crocheting a tunisian simple stitch washcloth out of some pretty blue cotton I’ve had lying around. And then this post from Purl Soho doing exactly what I wanted to do pops up on my Pinterest feed.

Well, hell. There’s really no reason to reinvent the wheel here. Or is there?

Reasons why Tunisian Simple Stitch is the ideal stitch for washcloths:

1. Two-sided: Tunisian simple stitch creates a smooth surface on one side of the work and a nubby, ridged surface (similar to garter stitch) on the other side. (The smooth side is pictured above, the nubby side is pictured below)

crochet washcloth 3

Nubby scrubby goodness.

2. Tunisian simple stitch rows are compact and set close together- no gaping holes in the stitchwork. Unlike the first crochet waschloth I attempted, which was in double crochet in a large gauge – terrible idea. It wasn’t the kind of dense, solid material you want for a washcloth.

3. Tunisian creates a firm fabric that doesn’t like to stretch (unlike knitting). So you’re crochet that looks neat and firm when made stays that way even when used to scrub! Again, my first washcloth ended up looking more like a fishing net because I used double crochet and it stretched like crazy.

In the end, there are a lot of crochet washcloth patterns out there. Even the skein of Bernat Cotton DeLux I used sported a free pattern for a crochet washcloth – one I beg you not to attempt, for the love of solid, usable washcloths.

An offset single crochet, ch 1 mesh? Uh.. no.

An offset single crochet, ch 1 mesh? Uh.. no.

I used a 6.00 mm tunisian crochet hook, some cotton yarn (pictured above) and a 25 stitch long Tunisian simple stitch repeat. Note that Purl Soho has a good Tunisian simple stitch tutorial if you need a primer.

crochet washcloth 2

The Purl Soho pattern uses Blue Sky Skinny Cotton. At which I laughed.

Blue Sky cotton at 14.50 a skein? For a washcloth? Uh… no.

There is so much affordable cotton yarn at the hobby stores and online – Lion Brand Kitchen Cotton is another of my favorites. You certainly don’t need to run out and buy boutique yarn for this kind of project.

Don’t have a tunisian hook? Fear not. Again, most of us don’t have Purl Soho budgets … some of us may not even want to spare the extra cash to get a special hook. The good news is that my washcloth is small enough to fit on a regular crochet hook with a stopper rigged up to the end.

crochet washcloth 4

Necessity is the mother of invention and also it’s a good excuse to get wine.

You could use duct tape or rubber bands, too. Anything that stops your stitches from slipping off the end of your hook.

The Best Crochet Washcloth Pattern:

Materials: Bernat Handicrafter Cotton DeLux, or other worsted weight cotton. A coordinating color (optional), tapestry or yarn needle.

Hook: 6.00 mm tunisian hook or regular hook with a stopper.

Gauge: 4 stitches in tunisian simple stitch = 1″

Ch 25.

Row 1: (forward pass) draw up a loop from each chain stitch.

Row 2: (backward pass) Yo, draw through one loop. *Yo, draw through 2 lps) repeat to the end.

Row 3: Ch 1 (counts as first stitch of forward pass), draw up a loop through each stitch to the end.

Repeat rows 2 and 3 22 more times.

When last backward pass is complete, chain 10. Slip stitch at the base of the chain (hanging loop for washcloth is complete), cut yarn and tie off.

Attach contrasting yarn color, single crochet in each stitch or row edge around the entire washcloth , working 3 sc at each corner. Join with a slip stitch when round is complete.

For an extra border, slip stitch  in each stitch two rows in from the edge stitches around the entire washcloth. Cut yarn and tie off.

Weave in all ends. Congratulate yourself for not having spent $50 on a damn washcloth.

-MF

Pattern Gallery: Crocheted Baskets

Are you being crowded out of your own life by piles of junk? I know I was.

That point was driven home, in fact, when my closet shelf collapsed under the weight of my junk, spreading books and clothes and fabric aaaaaaaall over the bedroom floor. I knew it was time to cut down.

Messages of “simple living” and “de-clutter your closet” have been all the rage lately, with people living in garden sheds and owning three items with ninety-five different purposes.  To which I usually say “No goddamn thank you.”

I like complicated living, and piles of junk that I can make stuff out of, and clutter that I can just generally roll around in with an ecstasy of creative potential. But with the closet nearly caving in, I had to take at least one leaf out of the Simple Life Evangelists’ book.

I said goodbye to several garbage bags full of junk that day.

So the things that were left after this devastation of simplification got organized, inspiring the following gallery of patterns for things to put other things in.

Crochet Baskets

MiniBasket

Simple Crochet Mini Basket Pattern from Just Be Crafty – Anything smaller than usual is automatically adorable. FREE!

Stashbasket

Stash Basket from Yarnspirations – Free! Because putting your yarn in a container made of yarn is so meta.

Hemp Basket

Hemp Basket from Craft Passion – I love the natural look of this hemp basket, plus the pattern is free!

diamond-trellis-basket-022

Diamond Trellis Basket from Make My Day Creative – Crochet basket with some definite flair!  Also free.

Plant Hanger 1

Partial Shades Plant Hanger from Morale Fiber – Organize your plants too!  Free from me.

These free patterns should get you started on making some sweet, sweet sense out of your clutter.

-MF

Partial Shades T-Shirt Yarn Plant Hanger

Crochet Plant Hanger 2Planting time has finally arrived for us poor apartment-dwelling folk, so last weekend my roommate and I got to work potting lettuce and herb starts. With limited sun access and temperatures stubbornly remaining at lows of 35-40 for the past few weeks, we have to wait to plant things like tomatoes and cukes.

But we don’t have to wait to plant spider plants. Do you know what a spider plant is? It’s a virtually useless decorative plant that sends out about a zillion long, spindly appendages that end in little white flowers that turn into more spider plants. And it’s really hard to kill them. So what you end up with is way more spider plants than anyone wants. So you frantically try to give them to other people so that THEY can have more spider plants than THEY want, essentially furthering the cause of this insidious, but sort of pretty, species.

They're plotting.

Potting? More like PLOTTING.

Anyway, the front porch railing currently has five spider plants sitting on it. Clearly something has to be done.

Plant hangers, of course!

Plant Hanger 1

“Partial Shades” T-Shirt Yarn Plant Hangers

A great mother’s day gift, especially if made from the grandkids’ old outgrown t-shirts! The color block or ombre look gives interest while the simple stitch pattern makes this a sturdy, uncomplicated project that you can finish in one relaxing weekend morning.

Some brief notes about T-shirt yarn + rambling:
See here for a guide to making t-shirt yarn.

T-Shirt Yarn 1

I used T-shirt yarn cut to 1” strips and stretched tightly – your yarn may differ slightly in gauge if you cut it thicker or do not stretch it as tight. Just size it to your pot as best you can, and if you need a reference for building flat circles for the bottom, see here.

If you haven’t already, try modifying your hold on the hook when working with T-shirt yarn – hold it like a dagger and not like a pencil. (Some of you may do this already. I personally am a pencil holder*, but switch to dagger when I have to deal forcefully with something.)

* I mean that I hold the hook like a pencil, not that I myself am a device for holding pencils.

Materials:

Size “K” hook

Different shades of T-shirt yarn – I used 2-3 balls of T-shirt yarn (2-3 Adult large t-shirts) per plant hanger. Results may vary.

A smallish planter – I used a 17” circumference  pot, and wrote the pattern for that size, but it’s easy to customize the size by adding or subtracting rounds to the bottom circle.

Large-eyed yarn or tapestry needle.

Make Magic Ring.

Rnd 1: 6 Sc into the ring. Join with a slip stitch in the first sc of the round.

Rnd 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first sc in this round or in any subsequent rounds) 2 sc in each sc around. Join with a sl st in the first sc of the round. – 12 sc

Rnd 3. Ch 1, sc in the same stitch, 2 sc in the next stitch. (1 sc in the next stitch, 2 sc in the next st) 5 times. Join with a sl stitch to the first sc of the round.- 18 sc.

T-Shirt Yarn 2

Rnd 4: Ch 1, sc in the same stitch, sc in the next stitch, 2 sc in the next stitch. (1 sc in each of the next 2 stitch, 2 sc in the next stitch) 5 times. Join with a sl st in the first sc of the round. – 24 sts

Rnd 5: Ch 1, sc in the same stitch, sc in each of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st. (1 sc in each of the next 3 sts, 2 sc in the next st) 5 times. Join with a sl st in the first sc of the round – 30 sts.

Rnd 6: Ch 1, sc in the same stitch, sc in each of the next 3 sts, 2 sc in the next st. (1 sc in each of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st) 5 times. Join with a sl st in the Back Loop Only of the first sc of the round – 36 sts.

T-Shirt Yarn 3

Continue working 6 increase stitches per round until your bottom circle can cover the bottom of your pot. The next round will be worked in the BACK LOOPS ONLY. This gives a nice, clean edge to the shape of your holder. If you like a rounder look, you can work both loops.

Rnd 7: In BLO. Ch 1, sc in the same stitch. 1 sc in each stitch around. join with a sl st to both loops of the first sc of the round.

T-Shirt Yarn 4

Rnd 8: Ch 1, sc in the same stitch. Sc in each st of the round. Join with a sl stitch.

Rnds 9-17: Rpt Rnd 8. You can change colors at any point during these repeats, depending on how many color changes you desire or how much of each color of t-shirt yarn you have.

Rnd 18: Sl st in ea st around. This cleans up the rim and makes a neat looking edge. Cut yarn and tie off. Weave in the yarn ends.

Cut 4 lengths of t-shirt yarn a little more than TWICE as long as you want your hanging length (I measured one armspan per, making half that length equal to the distance between my fingertips to my chest).

T-Shirt Yarn 5

Double each length up, looping them under stitches of round 17 (NOT row 18, the slip stitch row) at four equal intervals.

Shown with wrong side facing

Shown with wrong side facing

Hook the loose ends and bring them through the loop, tightening them into a knot. Grab two adjacent yarn lengths, as show here…

T-Shirt Yarn 7

and knot them less than halfway up. Do this for each point so that each yarn length is knotted to at length from an adjacent knot. Gather all the lengths together at the top and make one large knot, pulling tightly to secure (you can even slip a dab of glue in there if you plant on hanging a heavy pot).

Crochet Plant Hanger 2

Enjoy your airborn greenery!

-MF

Pinstructional:
Tshirt Yarn Plant Hanger

Picture Dump Disguised as Content

Again with the documenting old stuff. This time it’s crocheted T-shirt rugs, in three different flavors…

MERRY PRANKSTER

CATHEDRAL

CANDY SHOP

I made all of these small-ish circular-ish accent rugs by crocheting around strips of upcycled cotton t-shirt. The method of using worsted weight yarn to crochet around the t-shirt is a lot more effective, time saving, and economic than just trying to crochet the t-shirt yarn itself. I have tried to crochet t-shirt yarn. My wrist and arm end up screaming and the product is bulky and unwieldy, plus you need like a zillion t-shirts to finish one decent sized rug.

This way is flatter, prettier, and doesn’t give me carpal tunnel (much).

-MF

Pattern Gallery: The Pouf Collection

Crochet Pouf Gallery

Poufs, ottomans, small stools, floor cushions (n.) – furniture that allows me to lay around on the ground like a lazy slob while giving off the appearance of being classy. With five patterns and five iconic pieces, this collection is a both practical and inspirational gallery to get you started on the perfect warm-weather furniture essential.

Pattern Gallery – Poufs & Ottomans

Crochet Argyle Pouf

One: Argyle Bean Bag Ottoman

Free pattern from Red Heart. Because nothing says “hip to be dorky” louder than argyle.

Crochet Pinwheel Pouf

Two: Pinwheel Pouf

Pinwheel Pouf by Tara Schreyer – 4.99 USD on Ravelry. Simple and elegant to match muted or natural tone décors.

Crochet Pea Ottoman

Three: Pea Ottoman

Pea Ottoman from Dailyfix – Adorable free pattern inspired by a children’s story

Crochet Stylish Pouf

Four: Stylish Pouf

Stylish Pouf – Another free pattern from Red Heart that uses a small bean bag for the stuffing.

Crochet Granny Mandala

Five: Granny Mandala

Granny Mandala by Crochet with Raymond – if you’ve already got a structured, circular ottoman that just needs some zazz, this is a great free starter pattern for a colorful cover. Just follow in pattern until the main circle is almost as big as the top of your ottoman, then stop increasing.

Inspiration Gallery – Recycled

Because poufs sort of rock the fun & funky retrokitch macroniche anyway, they’re a great project to make with recycled materials.  The sometimes-wacky colors and textures of upcycled material don’t have to be overwhelming because these occupy the “accent piece” category.

Crochet Fabric Scrap Pouf

Six: Fabric Crochet Pouf

From “Fabric Crochet Madness… a pouf” by Silly Old Suitcase.

Crochet Plastic Bag Pouf

Seven: Recycled Bag Cushion

Recycled Bag Cushion via BobVila.com , originally from hipcycle.com. I love working with plastic bag yarn. I find it interesting and rewarding – and, at least in America, really really plentiful.

Inspiration Gallery – Nature

Cute style ideas that mimic nature, awesome for your favorite woodland cottage (or mid-city apartment that you imagine is a woodland cottage).

Crochet Mushroom Ottoman

Eight: Mushroom Pouf

Recreating this beauty would take some power tool geekery I’m sure, but damn the results would be impressive. Even if you aren’t into band saws, it’s good inspiration for other fungus-style furniture.

Crochet Pear Pouf

Nine: Giant Pear Cushion

A big ol’ pear, apparently from this blog, which I can’t read at all, but one look at this picture and I was in love. Giant crochet fruit furniture is directly up my alley in a big way… expect pictures of my own version of this (eventually) here on MF Blog and my Pinterest.

Plush Tree Trunk Stool

Ten: Plush Tree Trunk Stool

Plush Tree Trunk stool. This one’s firmly on my to-do list as well.

Enjoy the low-level lounging!

-MF

Lotus Throw Pattern

An unusually warm spell in the past week has nudged my thoughts toward all things lacy and airy in anticipation of sunnier skies – although my native Midwest instincts recognize this mild front for the cruel annual joke that it is. Still, the promise of thaw is hovering nearer and I am hurrying my bulky winter projects to completion so I can start working on pieces that remind me of long days and strolls in nature. You know, instead of things you’d wear while, say, being eaten by a yeti.

Like this free vintage pattern by Australian Women's Weekly on Ravelry. Watch out for sharknados.

Like this free vintage pattern by Australian Women’s Weekly on Ravelry. Watch out for sharknados.

AND SO more to the point, enjoy this free crochet pattern that I designed in Spring/Summer 2014. The specs for this piece are very loose – it’s intermediate level, designed as an elegant way to use up lonely skeins in your stash. Color changes are variable and there’s tons of room for adaptation: As a worsted weight piece it makes a pretty throw, add arm holes and work in sport weight to make a circular vest, or use heavier cordage to create a doily rug.

LotusCoverNew

Click here to get the FREE PDF download from my Ravelry store!

Lotus Circular Throw

5.5 mm hook

Worsted weight yarns of various colors

Skill Level: Intermediate

Gauge is not critical

Make ‘Magic Ring’

  1. 8 sc into the ring, tighten. Join with a slip stitch in first sc of the round.
  1. Ch 2 (counts as first dc), ch 1. (Dc, ch 1) in each of the next 7 sc. Join with a slip stitch.
  1. Slip stitch into first ch 1 space. Ch 2 (counts as first dc). Dc into ch-1 space 3 more times, keeping last loops on the hook. YO, draw through all four loops on the hook (first cluster made). Ch 3. (4 dc cluster, ch 3) in each of next 7 ch-1 spaces. Join with a sl st in top of first cluster.

4.Sl st in first ch-3 space. Ch 2 (counts as first dc), dc into ch-3 space 3 more times keeping last loops on the hook. YO, draw through all four loops on the hook (first cluster made),. Ch 2, 4 dc cluster in same ch-3 space, ch 2. (4 dc cluster, ch 2, 4 dc cluster, ch 2) in each of the ch-3 spaces around. Join with a sl st in top of first cluster.

  1. Sl st in first ch-2 space. Ch 2 (counts as first dc), dc into ch-2 space 3 more times keeping last lps on hk. YO, draw through all four lps on hk (first cluster made), Ch 3. (4 dc cluster into ch-2 space, ch 3) 15 more times. Join with a slip stitch in top of the first cluster.
  1. Sl st in first ch-3 space. Ch 3 (counts as first dc), 2 more dc in same space, Ch 3. (Dc, ch 3) in each ch-3 space around. Join with a sl st in first dc.
  1. Sl st in the top of the next dc. (Hdc into the next Ch-3 space, 1 dc, 1 tr, 1 dc, 1 hdc. Sk next dc, sl st in the next dc) shell made. Repeat 15 times around.Join with a sl st in first sl st.
  1. Ch 3, dc in same st, ch 3, sc in the top of next triple (top of fan), ch 3. (dc in last hdc of fan, ch 3, sc in next treble, ch 3) rpt 15 times around. Join with a sl st in first dc (not beg ch)
  1. Ch 3. Treble in next sc, leaving last lp on the hk, treble in next dc, leaving last lp on the hk (3 lps on hk) YO, draw through all three lps. Ch 7. (In same dc as previous treble, treble crochet leaving last lp on hk, treble in next sc leaving last lp on hk, treble in next dc leaving last lp on hk. YO, draw through all four lps on hk, ch 7) 15 more times. Join with a sl st in top of first treble.
  1. Ch 3 (counts as first dc), ch 1. ([Work 4 dcs in a cluster in ch 7 space, ch 2] twice. 4 dc cluster, ch 1*, dc in top of joined trebles, ch 1) rpt 15 times around, ending last repeat at *. Sl st into beg chain.
  1. (Ch 3. 4-dc cluster in next ch-2 space, ch 2, 4-dc cluster*, ch 3, sl st in next dc) 15 times. On 15th rpt, end at *, tr in 1st st of beg ch-3.
  1. Ch 3, tr in top of next cluster, ch 4, 4 dc in next ch-2 space, leaving last lps on the hk. YO, pull through all 5 lps on the hook. Ch 4. ([Tr in top of next cluster leaving last lp on the hk] twice, YO and pull through all 3 lps. Ch4, cluster in next ch-2 space, ch 4) rpt 14 times. Join with a sl st in top of beg chain.
  1. Sl st in next ch-4 space. Ch3 (counts as first dc), 4 dc in same space. (1 dc in top of cluster, 5 dc in next ch-4 space, dc in top of joined trebles, 5 dc in next ch-4 space) 14 times. 5 dc in next ch-5 space, join with a slip stitch to top of first dc.
  1. Ch 3, dc in same stitch, ch 1, sk 1 dc (dc in next dc, ch 1, sk next dc) around. Join with a sl stitch in top of first dc.
  1. (Sk next ch-1 space, [1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 edc, 1 dc, 1 hdc] in next dc, skip next ch-1 space, sl stitch in next dc) 45 times.

16.Join new color. Ch 3, dc in same stitch. Sk next st, 1 hd in next st, 1 sc in next st. (1 hdc, sk next st, 1 dc, sk next st, 1 hdc, 1 sc) rpt around. On last rpt, hdc in next stitch before joining with a sl st to first st in round.

  1. Ch 2, dc in same stitch, ch 2. (Sk next st, dc in next stitch, ch 2) rpt around. Join with a sl stitch to first dc in the round.
  1. Sl st into the first ch-2 space. (Sc in ch-2 space, ch 2) rpt around. Join with a sl st in first sc of the round.
  1. Rpt rnd 18.
  1. Rpt rnd 18.
  1. Sl st into the first chain space. Ch 3 (counts as first dc in V-stitch pattern). *(1 dc, ch1, 1 dc) in the next chain space. Rpt from * until last ch space is worked. In first chain space of round, 1 dc, ch 1, join with a sl stitch to first dc of rnd.
  1. Rpt rnd 21.
  1. Rpt rnd 21.
  1. Sc in first space. Ch 5, (sc in next ch-1 space, Ch 5) rpt around until last ch-1 space. Ch 2, dc into the first sc of round.

25-31. rpt rnd 24.

  1. Sc in first ch-5 sp, 5 dc in next sc (sc in next ch-5 sp, 5 dc in next sc) around, join with a sl st in first sc.
  1. Ch 3 (counts as first dc), ch 2, sc in top of fan, ch 2 (dc in next sc, ch 2, sc in top of next fan, ch 2) around. Join with a sl st to top of first dc.
  1. Ch 3 (counts as first dc), *(ch 1, dc in the next ch-2 sp) rpt from * around. Join with a sl st in top of first dc.
  1. Sl st into the next ch space, ch 3 (counts as first dc) *(ch 1, dc in the next ch-1 sp) rpt from * around. Joint with a sl st in top of first dc.
  1. Sl st into the next ch 1 space, ch 3 (counts as first dc), *(dc, ch 1, dc) in the next ch-1 sp, rpt from * around. in first ch 1 sp of round, dc, ch 1, join with a sl st to first dc of the rnd.
  1. Sl st to the next ch sp, ch 2 (counts as first dc in cluster), work 2 more dc in same space, leaving last lps on the hk. YO, pull through all lps on hk (3 dc cluster made), ch 1. *(3 dc cluster, ch1) in next ch-1 sp, rpt from * around. Join with a sl st in first dc of the round.
  1. Sc in same space, Ch 3 *(Sc in next ch-1 space, ch 3) rpt around from *. Join with a sl stitch in first sc of rnd.
  1. Sl st into the next ch-3 sp, sc in same space, ch 4, (Sc in next ch-3 space, ch 4, sc in next ch-3 space) repeat around. Join with a sl st into the first sc of round.
  1. *(4 dc, ch 2, 4 dc) into the next ch-4 space, sl st in between next pair of sc stitches, repeat from * around. Cut yarn and tie off.

Weave in ends with a tapestry needle.

If you liked my pattern you should check me out on Ravelry or on Pinterest!

-MF