Cobweb Wrap

I’ve always loved the way that fog reveals through tiny glimmering water droplets the cobwebs that weave together the grasses of a field. These little intricate fiber blobs go unnoticed until the water reflection lights them up, revealing a tiny world of complexity.

It was after these shining, tensile treasures that I named my newest design, the Cobweb Wrap – available now as a PDF crochet pattern in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Store! Keep reading for more info on the pattern or click the links to buy directly ❀ Thank you!

I’d been thinking about cobwebs a lot recently, due to receiving a really unique donation to my costume closet – The faerie costume of Texas Renaissance Festival participant “Cobweb the Faerie” known in our realm by her human alias, Laurie Hummel. My friend Jason inherited this item from a friend of a friend while living in Texas, and then mailed it to me, bequeathing me the title and associated memorabilia.

I felt an appropriateness about it, first of all because “cobweb” = a spinning of fibers to create a pattern, which seems a lot like what I do, and so there exists an affinity between my art and spiders as a concept (my relationship with actual spiders is ambivalent at best).

It’s an honor to be entrusted with someone else’s magic – I felt a similar sense of inheritance when I bought my secondhand spinning wheel. I felt the need to do a kind of tribute with Cobweb making an appearance modeling a design. Once I determined this, the perfect concept came forward as if it were ready and waiting.

I’ve wanted to try my hand at a gorgeous pineapple lace wrap similar to this one since it first made my romantic be-doilied heart skip a beat on Pinterest some years ago. This nascent idea for a delicate circular lace wrap/skirt, being so much like a web already, seemed appropriate for the character and the costume even matched with the thread I had ready for the project ❀

What I came up with is as simple as it is versitile – the large, 60″ circular center opening is controlled by a drawstring, to make both an adjustable waistband and an adjustable opening to drape around the shoulders.

I also added different length options – a shortened version of this pattern makes a swing-y skirt or vintage style lace shawl – instructions are given on how to work for Short, Midi, and Long lengths.

The foundation of the pattern is adjustable by a given amount, so that you can make this in larger hooks and yarns and adjust the pattern as necessary – more description of how to modify is given in the pattern notes, like for this DK weight version:

Wear ALL the different ways – shawl, poncho, wrap, layered skirt, lace dress! Read on for the details on materials and description of the pattern πŸ™‚

Cobweb Wrap

As delicate and gossamer as the silken threads that line the fields, the Cobweb Wrap is an impressive lace piece designed to be shown off!

The apparent intricacy belies the ease of a classic and simple lace pattern: the crochet pineapple. The popularity of this design over centuries is due to its accessibility – with just a few basic crochet stitches and a set of intuitive repeats, massive webs of beautiful lace can be woven easily!

Though named the pineapple, this design is a gorgeous geometric pattern that could be imagined many ways – peacock feathers, leaves, and even little spider bodies (creepy cute!). The pattern is in detailed written format, with 75+ tutorial photos and full video how-to for the hem (which you can access for free by following the link).

This wearable lace piece is convertible from skirt to shawl/wrap, includes instructions for resizing for different yarns and gauges with optional lengths of Short, Midi, and Long – and features the Pointed Pineapples technique, which creates a charming tattered silhouette that gives the wrap a romantic vintage feel ❀

Get the pattern now in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store!

Materials:
3.25 mm hook, 3.50 mm hook, 3.75 mm hook
#5 Crochet Thread – (I used Artiste brand 100% Acrylic thread, in 370 yard cones) – 6 cones for the full skirt
Scissors
Tapestry needle
Ribbon yarn or some kind of tie for drawstring

Sizes: Short, Midi, Long
Finished Measurements: ~60″ Top Opening, Up to ~32″ (Long)
All instructions are written in English, in US terminology.

More about my outfit: Cobweb the Faerie’s original costume pieces appear mixed and matched with my own additions – The light green flowery top, purple/green/gold tulle skirt, and flowered tulle headband are original to Laurie’s gear, as well as a pair of sheer golden wings not pictured on me here.

The green crochet vest is a variation on the Embla Vest, another original design from me.

The green leafy wrap necklace is a FREE pattern on my blog , the Ivy Crown.

The woolen costume dreads are dyed and felted & decorated by me.

The beautiful sage green bellydance skirt is from Magical Fashions.

Photography by Abel Benge ❀

I hope that I’ve done justice to Cobweb’s persona (faeriesona?), as well as adding my own interpretation and that Laurie, though I didn’t know her, would approve!

-MF

Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial

One of the very first things I tried my hand at when I began crafting more complex crochet projects was the bikini top. It seemed like such a doable project, in a relatively short amount of time, and for great rewards – something totally cute to wear that I MADE!

Well, once I started I never did stop trying variations of these, and I became fascinated with the different ways these comfortable and fun projects could be shaped. I followed other patterns, looked at charts and countless examples on Pinterest, and made many of my own including some for which I formed specific designs and published as PDFs!

(Pictured above: The Basic Bralette)

But it was the popularity of the Basic Bralette Tutorial that spurred me to finally create a general Bikini Cup tutorial. Much like with the bralette design, the Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial is meant to be a jumping-off pattern from which you can experiment with your own unique variations.

For the Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial, we’re going to give a bunch of examples and show how cup shape and size can be modified by varying stitch height and increases.

Hopefully this is a good overview useful for both seasoned crocheters as a quick reference and for newbies who don’t know where to start. If you like this tutorial and want to save it, give it a fave on the Ravelry design page!

I’ve included photos, written instructions, AND how-to videos with examples of the strategies used to create one-of-a-kind halter tops and bikinis out of these customized cups ❀ I hope you love!

Check out these other halter top patterns from Morale Fiber or keep scrolling for the FREE Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial!

Basic Bikini Cup Tutorial

Notes:

-Cups are worked by stitching up one side of the foundation row, increasing at the peak (or end) and stitching down the other side. These rows are turned and worked back and forth, placing the increases at the central top for every row.
-First row counts as the foundation row, not Row 1 – be careful when counting your rows. I find it easiest to count by the number of increases.
-Beginning chain does not count as first stitch
-Cups can be worked to desired size by adding rows that maintain the established pattern
-Cups can be put together in a multitude of ways – crochet around them and experiment with inventing unique halters of your own – I tried to include lots of inspiration photos!
-The following includes the pattern of three basic size/shape options, which illustrate the different ways to modify size. Mix and match the strategies as shown to create a custom fit ❀
-Find video tutorial instructions on creating your own unique halter below the written patterns & check out the examples provided throughout! πŸ™‚

Size and shape are determined by manipulating the following factors:


1. Stitch height: Here I’m working with single crochet (sc), half double crochet (hdc) and double crochet (dc)
2. Foundation Length: The number of stitches that make up the central row to be stitched around. I stick within the range of 10-15 normally but it can be any amount.
3. Increase Style: Increases are placed at the central peak of the cup – here I’m either adding +4 stitches per row (2 stitch, 1 chain, 2 stitches increases – where the chain does not count) or +2 stitches per row (1 stitch, 1 chain, 1 stitch increases).
4. Number of Rows: How many rows of stitching are made.

I make a few size recommendations below each cup – but just be aware that you can make any of these to any size desired, depending on how you finish them.

Single Crochet Cups

Stitch: SC
Foundation #: 10
Increases: (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc)

Ch 11 – (10 chain stitches for the foundation stitches, + 1 extra for the turn)

Foundation Row: Sk first ch st, 1 sc in the 2nd ch from the hook and in each of the next 9 ch sts. – 10 sc

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first sc), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 9 sts. In the end of the foundation row, working into the 1 ch st left over from the foundation, work (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc). Rotate the row so as to work down the opposite side, into the initial foundation chain (working the bottom loops). 1 sc in ea of the next 10 sts. – 22 sc

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 10 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 11 sts. – 24 sc

Row 3: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 11 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 13 sts. – 26 sc

Row 4: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 12 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 14 sts. – 28 sc

Row 5: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 13 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 15 sts. – 30 sc

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 14 sc. (1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 sc in ea of the next 16 sts. – 32 sc

You can continue on in this pattern for as many rows as you like, maintaining the same method of increasing in the central ch-1 and working 1 stitch in every other stitch.

Above: Two single crochet style cups. Left – Foundation 10 sts, +2 / (1sc, ch 1, 1 sc) increases.
Right – Foundation 5 sts, +4 / (2 sc, ch 1, 2 sc) increases.

I worked the SC, +4 increase style cup for 9 rows to make the top shown below. This pattern makes a very small, flat cup and is appropriate for A cup sizes.

And Sc, +2 increases and 9 rows to make this top – I recommend this cup for A-B size busts.

Half Double Crochet Cups

Stitch: HDC
Foundation #: 10
Increases: (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc)

Pictured Above, from left to right:
1. HDC, Foundation 10 sts, +2 / (1 hdc, ch 1, 1 hdc) increases.
2. HDC, Foundation 15 sts, +2 (1 hdc, ch 1, 1 hdc) increases.
3. HDC, Foundation 10 sts, +4 (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) increases.

Ch 12 – (10 chain stitches for the foundation stitches, + 2 extra for the turn.)

Foundation Row: Sk first 2 ch sts. 1 hdc in the 3rd ch from the hk and in ea of the next 9 ch sts. – 10 hdc.

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 9 sts. In the end of the foundation row, working into the side of the 2 chains left over from the foundation, work (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc). Rotate the row so as to work down the opposite side, into the initial foundation chain (working the bottom loops). 1 hdc in ea of the next 10 sts. -24 hdc

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count), turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 11 hdc. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 12 sts. – 28 hdc

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 13 sts. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 14 sts. – 32 hdc

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 15 sts. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 16 sts. – 36 hdc

Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 17 sts. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 18 sts. – 40 hdc

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 19 sts. (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 hdc in ea of the next 20 sts. – 44 hdc

You can continue on in this pattern for as many rows as you like, maintaining the same method of increasing in the central ch-1 and working 1 stitch in every other stitch.

Cups made with either +2 increases or +4 increases in HDC are my all-purpose cup pattern. They really do well with most bust sizes, have good proportional qualities, and are a good place to start if you don’t know your preferred size exactly.

In this YouTube video, I show how to work the HDC, +4 increase style step by step – but it’s a good example of the techniques no matter what stitch and increase combo you use! Check it out:

I used HDC, +4 increases to make this top:

The crocodile stitch scale portion that I worked onto the bottom of the cups is from my Feather & Scale Halter Top crochet pattern! πŸ™‚

Double Crochet Cups

Stitch: DC
Foundation #: 15 (+2)
Increases: (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc)

Pictured Above: 1. (Top) – DC, Foundation 15 sts, +4 / (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) increases.
2. DC, Foundation 5 sts, +4 / (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) increases.

Ch 17 – (15 for the foundation sts, + 2 to turn)

Foundation Row: Sk first 2 ch sts. 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hk and in ea of the next 14 ch sts. – 15 dc.

Row 1: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts. In the end of the foundation row, working into the side of the 2 chains left over from the foundation, work (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc). Rotate the row so as to work down the opposite side, into the initial foundation chain (working the bottom loops). 1 dc in ea of the next 15 sts. – 34 dc

Row 2: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 17 sts. – 38 dc

Row 3: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. – 42 dc

Row 4: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. – 46 dc

Row 5: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. – 50 dc

Row 6: Ch 2, turn. 1 dc in the same st. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 dc. (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in the next ch-1 space. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. – 54 dc.

You can continue on in this pattern for as many rows as you like, maintaining the same method of increasing in the central ch-1 and working 1 stitch in every other stitch.

I used the DC, +4 increases style cups with the 5-stitch foundation length to make this bikini! DC stitch cups get wider faster (because of stitch height) and are therefore a great choice for fuller busts.

DC, +4 increases with a foundation length of 15 makes a much bigger cup, as you can see in this halter top (I’m a B-ish cup but it could easily fit a larger chest)

Finishing Your Bikini

There are a lot of different strategies for completing a crocheted top once both bikini cups have been made. First, you’ll need to attach them, which I usually do by crocheting across the bottom of one cup, then directly onto the bottom of the other as one row.

From there, you can crochet rows off the side, work in rounds, add straps, and create other features such as decorative stitching an added motifs. Here’s some side views of completed tops to show the bands and straps:

The video demo below shows how to crochet a bottom band to attach the cups, as well as some of my strategies for creating a finished top including creating bands and straps. I also show in more detail the types of finishings on the tops pictured above πŸ™‚

By utilizing the different lengths of foundation stitch, stitch height, and number of increased stitches, this style of bikini cup can be made exactly as you like! I hope this tutorial and explanation is useful, and if you have specific questions be sure to leave a comment! ❀

Thanks – and don’t forget to get out (safely) into the sunshine!

-MF

Teddy Bear Onesie

The craze for animal-themed full-body pyjamas here in America has mostly passed my wardrobe by, but I have to admit that when I saw a fuzzy, teddy bear version with shorts and a hood while online shopping I thought it would look awefully cute.

The problem was that the product was on one of those cheap knockoff websites, you know, the same kind that steal images from independent artists like me and use the picture to sell terrible swill. So even if I could order a product that would actually fit my body (I checked the measurements chart – I couldn’t) I probably wouldn’t receive anything I’d actually want to wear.

So I thought to myself, as I very often do: “I could probably crochet that.”

And the next time I was in the Bad Yarn Buying Place, lo and behold I did find the absolute perfect yarn to imitate the garment I wanted. I decided to create what I wanted for me, and then document the process and offer it as a free tutorial here! Crappy companies steal from me and make money, so I’m stealing from crappy companies and giving back to you. And hopefully making some money. πŸ˜‰ (Speaking of which, have you seen my new Tip Jar?)

I intend to create a more comprehensive pattern for this in the future, with more detailed stitch counts and size options, but for now a description of my math and a photo tutorial with written instructions for the size I made (small) should get you started! If you make it I’d love to see – I have a Facebook Group for sharing crochet projects and we’d love to have you!

Keep scrolling for the FREE tutorial! If you want to save it for later, give it a fave on the Ravelry Pattern Page.

Materials & Notes:

Red Heart Hygge Fur (#5 Bulky, 7 oz/200 g, 260 yds – color shown is “Smokey) – 6 skeins
6.00 mm crochet hook
Buttons – I used 5/8ths inch buttons but next time I would choose inch buttons as they ended up being a little small
Ribbon or tie for the waist (optional) – I used an acyrlic mesh ribbon yarn
Scissors & tapestry needle
Measuring tape (comes in handy)

Gauge: 6 sts & 4 rows = 2″ (I measured gauge carefully but all other measurements given for schematics, fit, etc are approximated with measuring tape with the garment laid flat πŸ™‚ )

Notes: As mentioned in my demo video (link below), this pattern utilizes a yarn that makes the stitches very hard to see – so I recommend keeping good note of your stitch counts and rows! I didn’t always exactly do that, but the good news is, it’s also really easy to fudge it on this project πŸ˜›

If you’re customizing your own size working from my tutorial, you may want to keep the Craft Yarn Council Standard Sizes page handy πŸ™‚

Video Demo for working this yarn can be found here on my YouTube Channel.

Stitches Used:
Ch – chain
hdc – half double crochet
fpdc – front post double crochet
bpdc – back post double crochet
hdc2tog – half double crochet 2 together – also known as a decrease (dec)
sc – single crochet
sl st – slip stitch
MR – magic ring

Instructions

Shorts

To begin, Ch 85. Join in the first ch of the round with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first dc.) 1 hdc in every stitch. Join with a slip stitch in the first hdc of the round. – 85 sts.

Rows 2 – 20: Rpt Row 1.

Cut yarn and tie off. You’ll have a 10″ long tube, about 28″-30″ in circumference. This is most of the shorts. Next, we’ll add a small flat panel to the bottom to define the crotch and leg area.

Panel

Ch 7.

Row 1: 1 hdc in the 2nd ch from the hook. 1 hdc in ea of the next 5 ch sts. – 6 hdc.

Rows 2-10: Ch 1 (does not count). 1 hdc in every stitch. – 6 sts.

Cut yarn and tie off. Position the insert in the middle of the shorts, with one short edge against the edge on one side, and the opposite sides match the same way in the middle on the other side. Sew on the panel after checking there is an even amount of stitches left open on either side of the panel, for the legs.

I had 37 sts left free on either side for mine. I had 85 sts total for the waist, so minus the 6 sts on either side (12 total) I would have 73 remaining total. 73 / 2 = 36.5, but I’m fudging and saying 37 for simplicity’s sake. Things are fuzzy enough that 1/2 stitch estimate isn’t going to matter πŸ˜‰

Pictured above: shorts laid flat after panel is added. Also you can see my reflection.

Once the insert is placed, each leg hole will have rows added to lengthen the bottom of the shorts.

Shorts – Legs instructions
Row 1: Hdc in each hdc around, placing decreases at the corners were the insert meets the upper shorts. 1 hdc in the side of each row of the insert when working across.

Rows 2-4: 1 hdc in ea stitch around. I ended up with 42 stitches, I think I placed a couple extra decreases. Check the fit to find the right amount for you πŸ™‚

Once the rows for each leg are added, cut yarn and tie off. Shorts portion complete!

Upper Body

Belt Rib:

Locate the center stitch of the front portion of the shorts (this could be either side at this point – the shorts are identical front to back). You can do this by counting, measuring, counting up from the center of the insert, whatever. I eyeballed it carefully. We are now going to work 3 rows of post double crochets (you can find a tutorial for Post Stitches here on my blog if you don’t know how), to add some texture and a belt-loop placement for the hips.

Join new yarn at this center stitch on the top edge, working into Row 1 of the shorts. Ch 2 – does not count as first double crochet.

Row 1: 1 FPDC in the same stitch. 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) around. Join with a slip stitch in the first st. – 85 sts

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count). 1 FPDC in the next FPDC, 1 BPDC in the next BPDC. – 85 sts

Row 3: Rpt Row 2.

Do not tie off. For the next portion of the body, we continue working but stop joining the rounds at the end – instead we will be working back and forth in rows. This creates a front opening for the garment.

Pictured above: Post stitch rib rounds completed, with the first few rows of back- and – forth hdc added.

Torso

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in every stitch. – 85 sts

Next, mark 1 point at each side of the torso – the place that falls at either hip. We will decrease at each of these points over the next two rows.

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in ea st around until reaching the marked stitch. 1 hdc2tog (dec) over the marked stitch and the next st – place marker. 1 hdc in ea st around until reaching the 2nd marker. 1 hdc2tog (dec) over the marked st and the next st – place marker. 1 hdc in ea of the remaining sts – 83 sts.

Row 3: Repeat Row 2 – 81 sts.

Row 4: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in ea st around.

Rows 5- 20: Rpt Row 4.

Top Panels – Front

Now that biggest part of the upper body is build onto the shorts, we’ll fit the shoulder area. This will depend a little on how big you need your armholes – larger arms will need to leave a few more stitches unworked and/or make the panels slightly longer.

First, take two stitch markers and find the middle of each side of the garment (find by counting back from the split). Mark these two stitches as references.

For size small, I’m marking out a section 4-5 stitches inward from the front split on either side, and 4-5 sts inward from the side marker at either side. For my size the front panels will be 12 sts or ~4″ in width. Mark where you want your panels. Attach yarn at any of the markers.

Row 1: Ch 1 (does not count) 1 hdc in the same stitch. 1 hdc in ea stitch across. – 12 sts.

Rows 2-15: Rpt Row 1.

Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat on the other side of the front, counting 4-5 stitches inward of the front split in the opposite direction.

Pictured above: Both 12-stitch long front panels completed. You can also see the completed back panel behind those, which we are about to tackle…

Top Panel – Back

For the back top panel, count again 4-5 stitches inward from the marked stitch on either side and place a marker for this area. Mine was 35 stitches in width, about 11.5-12″.

Row 1: Attach yarn at marked area. Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea stitch across. – 35 sts.

Row 2: Ch 1, 1 hdc in ea st across. – 35 sts.

Rows 3-15: Rpt Row 2.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Pictured above: Back top panel, complete

Sleeves

Match the top edges of the front and back panels so that the outer edges of the front panels are aligned with the outer edges of the back panel.

With a yarn and tapestry needle, sew a seam across the top edges, matching each stitch together, with a whip stitch. Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat for other shoulder seam.

Pictured above: Shoulders with seams marked

With the stitch markers, mark where the seam you just sewed is located on either side.

Round 1: Attach yarn at the bottom of the sleeve, in the center of the unworked spaces at the armpit. Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea of the next sts around the entire sleeve, moving the marked stitch’s marker to the stitch above it as you work.

Rnd 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc). 1 hdc in ea of the next sts around until reaching the marked stitch at the shoulder. 1 hdc2together over the marked stitch and the next st – move marker to stitch just made. 1 hdc in ea of the remaining sts. Join with a sl st in the first hdc of the round. – 36 sts.

Pictured Above & below: First three rounds with marker moved

Rnd 3: Rpt Rnd 2. – 35 sts.

Rnds 4 -32: Ch 1 (does not count). 1 hdc in every st around. Join with a sl st. – 35 sts.

Rnd 33: Ch 2 (does not count as first double crochet). 1 FPDC in the same st. 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) around. Sk last st if your total sts are not an even number ( this also makes a good thumbhole if your sleeves are long enough). – 34 sts.

Rnds 34-35: Repeat round 33.

Cut yarn and tie off. Repeat for other side’s sleeve.

Hood

Row 1: Ch 21. Hdc in the 2rd ch from the hook and in ea of the next 17 ch sts. 2 hdc in the next ch st. 2 hdc in the last ch st. Rotate the chain to begin working in the bottom loop of the foundation chain stitches. 2 hdc in the next st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts made by the opposite side of the foundation chain. – 42 sts

Row 2: Ch 1 (does not count as first hdc), turn. 1 hdc in same st. 1 hdc in the next 17 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next st. 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. – 45 sts

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 2 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. – 48 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 18 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 3 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. – 51 sts


Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 4 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. – 54 sts

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 19 sts. 2 hdc in the next st.(1 hdc in the next 5 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. – 57 sts


Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 6 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. – 60 sts


Row 8: Ch 1, turn, 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 20 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 7 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 22 sts. – 63 sts


Row 9: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 8 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 22 sts. – 66 sts


Row 10: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in the same st. 1 hdc in the next 21 sts. 2 hdc in the next st. (1 hdc in the next 9 sts, 2 hdc in the next st) twice. 1 hdc in the next 23 sts – fig 57. – 69 sts

Pictured above: Hood to row 10
Pictured above: Hood, folded long the middle seam.

From here, the following rows work no increases to form the length of the pocket of the hood.

Rows 11-25: Ch 1, turn. 1 hdc in ea st across. – 69 sts

Row 26: Ch 2, turn (does not count as first dc). 1 FPDC in the first st, 1 BPDC in the next st. (1 FPDC, 1 BPDC) across. Sk last st if number is odd to provide even repeats.

Rows 27-28: Ch 2, turn. 1 BPDC in ea BPDC, 1 FPDC in ea FPDC across.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Ears / Tail (Make 3)

This piece is worked circularly in the round, then flattened to make one double-sided half circle shape which serves as both the ears and the tail. Make 3 total.

Round 1:Make magic ring – 6 sc into the ring. Join with a sl st in the first sc.

Round 2: Ch 1, does not count as first sc. 2 sc in ea sc around. Join with a sl st – 12 sc.

Rnd 3: Ch 1, 1 sc in the first st. 2 sc in the next st. (1 sc in the next st, 2 sc in the next st) rpt 5 times. Join with a sl st. – 18 sc.

Rnd 4: Ch 1, 1 sc in the first st, 1 sc in the next st. 2 sc in the next st. (1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st) 5 times. Join with a sl st. – 24 sc

Rnd 5: Ch 1, 1 sc in ea st around. -24 sc.

Rnds 6-9 or 10: Rpt Rnd 5.

Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Assembly:

Attach new yarn to the corner of the front opening of the onesie, so that you are working down the side of the hdc rows toward the bottom middle of the split . 1 sc in the side of each row of hdc, skipping the last – 19 hdc.

Rotate and begin to single crochet up the side of the rows on the opposite of the opening, stopping at the opposite corner. This is your button band – I sewed my buttons onto this row. I didn’t use buttonholes, opting instead to use the natural openings between stitches – if you follow my lead, you’ll need slightly bigger buttons πŸ˜› But it works okay. You can also place button openings by skipping stitches and replacing them with chains.

With the buttonhole band complete, you’ll continue working across the collar. Before continuing, find the central foundation chain of the hood and attach it via locking stitch marker to the center of the collar (found by counting out).

From here, I slip stitched the hood onto the collar by inserting my hook into both layers at once, matching one stitch per row end on the hood.

You’ll likely have to slip stitch over a few stitches before you reach the point where you begin the hood seam. It’s also perfectly acceptable to cut your yarn, tie off, and just sew your hood seam using yarn and tapestry needle – I just prefer the sl st method because the seam is sturdier.

Once the hood is complete, try on the garment if possible to fit the ears and tail where you like them, using stitch markers as a guide on where to sew. Whip stitch the edges of flattened half circles together and sew on.

With my yarn and needle, I sewed on a long and frankly overpopulated line of buttons onto one side of the opening. As mentioned earlier, my buttons are a little small to be using the stitch holes, but whatever.

Lastly, after I had woven in all the ends, I strung a length of mesh ribbon yarn through the post stitch belt loops as a tie. This garment is pretty heavy when all assembled so the belt helps keep it all stabilized.

And with that, voila! You or someone you love is now a Teddy Bear.

This piece could EASILY be any of its components as a stand-alone – i.e, just the hood with ears, or just the upper portion to make a hoodie, etc. I don’t think I could pull off just the shorts portion personally but someone might wanna try πŸ˜‰

As I mentioned earlier I do intend on creating a fully formatted pattern with sizes and exact stitch counts at some point – until then, enjoy and let me know what you think! ❀

You know, I was almost a little embarrassed to post these pictures. I don’t know if anyone would guess, but it’s a pretty big challenge for me to put myself out there like I do all the time here. So why do I do it? Because some inner force compels me to make weird stuff and share it.

Life is short. Wear whatever the F$%# you want.

-MF

P.S – I had to work really hard not to make a Quarenstain Bears joke in the main text.

Pattern Gallery: Scrappy

I’d gotten out of the habit of doing pattern collection posts until last December when I couldn’t resist a Krampus-themed one. Now I’ve been thinking about all the scrappy projects I’ve done, and decided I’d do one focused just on my pattern offerings because hey, what am I here for anyway πŸ˜‰

Scrappy projects are those that utilize scrap lengths of yarn, leftovers that aren’t big enough for full projects. Technically any project can use scrap yarn if you want it to, but these are projects I designed to feature the nature of scraps in some way, or create an easy way to use them – i.e – strategize a way to feature unwoven in ends & short stripes, or create a pattern flattering to frequent color changes.

So here you go! I hope you enjoy and come share your projects on our Facebook Group, the Magic Fantastic Crochet Atelier!

Scrappy Patterns

1. Scrappy Granny Shawl – FREE. Super easy to customize and looks great in virtually any yarn. The Granny block stitches are a familiar and easy semi-open pattern that breaks up the color changes creating neat colored patches to the eye. Plus you just gotta feel like a boho damsel in this one!

2. Wayfarer Ruana – This giant ruana is a FREE pattern that combines both knit and crochet. The knit body of the ruana utilizes some very small scraps and is a serious scrapbuster! I also designed the garment with a fringe that incorporates the loose ends of all those scraps, so you don’t have to weave in. The edge of the piece is a sewn-on strip of granny squares, because why not? Hidden within this blog post pattern is a detailed, free, and easy tutorial for crochet granny squares designed for beginners, because I wanted to πŸ˜‰

3. Pixie Belt Tutorial – Inspired by less traditional styles (or perhaps FAR more traditional styles depending on your views of the little folk) comes the supremely fun to create Pixie Belt. This project is great for mixing and matching yarns, using up small scraps, and even busting some of your fabric stash. I make them and sell them as costume pieces to friends and festival-goers, or perhaps you know a little folk yourself who needs a mini-version πŸ™‚ The free tutorial for customizing your own comes as a series on my blog but is also purchasable as a single collection in one PDF.

4. Scrappy Knit Duster – The free knit tutorial for this western duster coat follows in the heritage of the Wayfarer Ruana, using small bits to knit long panels of color, leaving the unwoven ends as part of the fringe which is incorporated into the design. This garment provides a more snug fit than the ruana – and sleeves of course – because I wanted something that I could use for more everyday wear.

5. Rhiannon Hooded Cowl – I originally made these using scraps, then decided to write a pattern for the design to sell and used preplanned commercial yarns. Eventually, I decided it needed an aesthetic renewal and returned it to it’s scrappy state where I think it truly functions best, offering it both for free on my blog (via the link at the beginning of the paragraph) or in purchasable PDF format via my shops (linked at the top of the blog). I love that this design lives a double life ❀ appropriate.

6. Sun Dogs Throw – This free throw blanket crochet pattern was a result of my desire to destash a lot of colorful worsted weight acrylics – though I chose a rainbow so I could have a bright, fun camping blanket this season, this throw works great in any color combination and the 8-point expansive design makes it extra cozy and wrappable. The center uses up small scraps neatly and the outer edges eat up whole spare skeins πŸ˜‰

7. The Flower Child Pullover – One of the few exclusively paid patterns on the list, you can find it in my pattern shops linked above or through the blog post linked just here πŸ™‚ Though technically I could list the cousin pattern the Mandala Top in this collection as well, I won’t because the Flower Child pattern has a feature that makes it specific to scrap busting – a list of the approximated yardage requirements for each round, for #4 worsted weight yarns. Hopefully that chart makes it easier to use up scraps by taking away some guesswork!

8. Daydreamer Poncho – Another pattern originally sprung from scraps, written for preplanned commercial yarn, and then remade in the image of Scrap πŸ™‚ I guess I do that a lot. Anyway, I also revamped this design to include a skirt look, making it convertible too. The Daydreamer Poncho is a paid crochet pattern available in my pattern stores (linked above) or linked on the page given here with more info ❀

That’s it for my scrappy offerings today, though I’m sure more will occur in future. Looking back at all these patterns, I’m entertained at how they are pretty evenly split between faerie and rustic, fantasy and romantic western. Am I, at heart, a fairy cow girl? The historical evidence is fairly damning. Lol!

-MF

Sundogs Throw

Recently as I was attempting to cram coax yarn into my shelves while my friend Arika looked on and giggled, I got inspired to do a little stash-busting. Instead of continuing to struggle, I threw out some spare skeins out on the floor and together we crafted an eye-pleasing sequence of colors just for the fun of it, and as I looked on my mental list nudged me. I’ve been meaning to do something like this for a while!

Based on an old motif I made years ago, this circular blanket pattern is worked in #4 weight acrylic yarns changing color every (or nearly every) row. It’s rainbow inspiration is perfect for using up the bright, cheap acrylics that are ubiquitous in my stash thanks to my (welcome) reputation among my friends as a walking Yarn Orphanage πŸ˜‰

Named the Sun Dogs Throw after the optical effects that occur when ice crystals refract light into rainbows around the sun – I imagined this retro, prismatic piece as a tribute to funky love blankies everywhere, the kind that travel with you but always remind you of home. And what better way to show it off than with an impromptu Rainbow Sprite photoshoot with your friends?

(Models clockwise from bottom left – Debbra Lee, Daisey Denson, Kate May, and Arika Harris!)

And so I created a summertime throw for laying under the rays of the sun, or draping across the chair for morning coffee by the fire. It makes a pretty good wearable shawl too πŸ˜‰ I hope you love it! I’ll be taking mine camping as soon as possible ❀

Update!: The Ravelry Page is up for this design so give it a fave if you want to save it for later ❀

Materials

Hook: 6.00 mm

Yarn: Lots of colors in worsted weight acrylics. My estimate ~ 1000 – 1200 yards

Gauge = 6 sts & 3 rows = 2”

Finished measurements: 85” across from crest to crest, 55” across from trough to trough

Notes: Change color after every round or so. Join new color to the first stitch of the round.

Instructions

To begin, make Magic Ring

Rnd 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc). 11 dc into the ring, join with a sl st into the 1st dc – 12 dc.

Rnd 2: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc). 1 dc in the same st. 2 dc in each of the next 11 sts. Join with a sl st in 1st dc. – 24 dc

Rnd 3: Sc in the same st as join, ch 4, skip 2 sts (sc in the next st, ch 3, skip 2 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in 1st sc – 8 ch-3 spaces made.

Rnd 4: Sl st into the next ch-3 space. Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc 4 more times into the same space, ch 1. (5 dc into the next ch-3 space, ch 1) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in 1st dc. – 8 blocks of 5-dc, 8 ch-1 spaces made.

Rnd 5: Ch 2 (counts as 1st hdc), 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, hdc in the next st, 2 sc in the next ch-1 space. (Hdc in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, hdc in the next st, 2 sc in the next ch-1 space) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st hdc.

Rnd 6: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc in the next st. 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts. Sc2tog over the next 2 sts. (1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 2 sts, sc2tog over the next 2 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 7: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts, skip next sc. (1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, 3 tr in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts, sk next st) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 8: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 3 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st into the 1st dc.

Rnd 9: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 5 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr)  in the next st, 1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 6 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 10: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 7 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 8 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 11: Ch 3 (counts as 1 st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 9 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next st. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 10 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 12: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 11 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 12 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 13: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 13 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 14 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 14: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 15 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 16 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 15: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 17 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 18 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 16: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 19 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 17: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 20 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

 Rnd 18: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 21 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.  

Rnd 19: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 22 sts. Sk next st. Sl st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 20: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 23 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 21: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 24 sts. Sk next st. Sl st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 22: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 25 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 23: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 26 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 24: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 25: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 27 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 28 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 26: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 29 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 27: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 30 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 28: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 31 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 29: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 32 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join

Rnd 30: Ch 3 (does not count as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr in the next ch-1 sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts, sk next 2 sts, 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts.) rpt 7 times. 1 dc in ea of the next 33 sts. Sk next st. Slip st in the first dc to join.

Rnd 31:  Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 34 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 35 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 32: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 36 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 37 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 33: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 38 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 39 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 34: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 40 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 41 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 35: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 42 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 43 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Rnd 36: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc), 1 dc in ea of the next 44 sts. (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts. (1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts, (2 tr, ch 1, 2 tr) in the next ch sp. 1 dc in ea of the next 45 sts) rpt 7 times. Join with a sl st in the 1st dc.

Cut yarn and tie off, weave in all ends.

(they’re about to drop a sick album)

Is it just me or is there something really, really comforting about a handmade, bright, crocheted blanket? I slept under them as a kid all the time – my grandma Metzger’s work – and we used them as blankets to lay on the grass in the summer, and they always smelled like the same closet, the closet upstairs next to my parent’s room, where I was born.

I hope this blanket design becomes like those, when it goes out in the world. The kind you can feel the love in. ❀

-MF

P.S- We all dug in my crochet bin and decorated with other goodies for this photoshoot, so here’s what else we’re wearing!

Me: (Pictured just above) The Valkyrie Top

Daisey Denson: Mehndi Halter Top, Lotus Hooded Duster

Debbra Lee: Embla Vest (sleeved) , Patchwork skirt sewn by me from Wendy Kay’s No Gathers Skirt pattern on Etsy.

Arika Harris: Embla Vest (linked above), and the Sundogs Throw of course πŸ˜‰

Kate May: Embla Vest (linked above) and Basic Bralette

Thanks again to my amazing models for always being willing to dress up crazy, hike out into the mud and rocks, alternately freeze / sweat / get blinded by the sun, and generally have a blast with me πŸ™‚

Forest Guide Hat

I debated with myself for a long time about what to call this fantastical creature hat. In the end, I chose “Forest Guide” because “Three Eyed Antlered Inter-dimensional Fox Spirit Guide” seemed too long. Whatever you call it, this new design is available for FREE here in this blog post or as a downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Etsy Shop or Ravelry Store. Read on for more details!

Let’s rewind a minute to talk about the inspiration for this design- this hat was conceived in several different parts, the first part being that I see faces in random blobs (a common human tendency called “pareidolia” and side effect of having any kind of imagination) and I saw a three-eyed antlered fox one day while staring sleepily at the tapestry on my bedroom wall.

“Say” I said to myself, “that would make a weird hat.” You see, I had recently completed a custom commissioned piece for a complex hat with tons of details based on my Krampus Hat pattern. It was an experience that gave me lots of new ideas.

The free pattern for the Krampus Hat itself has produced so many amazing, creative interpretations that I wanted to do another pattern that was similarly Out There. And I wanted to keep exploring the 3-D, sculptural crochet techniques that I have already been dabbling in for a while (like with the Deer Hat and the Sylphie Hat).

Plus, CREATURES. I like ’em. Rawr.

So I stared at my tapestry a bit more, made some sketches, and worked out a vague plan. I was aiming to create something mystical, and complex, and cute but creepy in a Ghibli-esque sort of way. An elusive forest spirit, a shapechanger, a keeper of the paths.

One of the best parts about designing this was all the little shapes that make up the details of the hat – there are 23 individual amigurumi components to this hat. That’s a lot! But with so many options, the piece can be customized to your heart’s content OR the details can be used individually for different projects (Make just the fox hat, or those antlers might make an awesome headpiece on their own, or the cute crescent moon could adorn something…)

I hope you enjoy this FREE crochet pattern for the Forest Guide hat, and have as much fun creating it as I did. This pattern is available with all the same features here as a downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Store!

100% of the proceeds from the first five days of PDF sales for this pattern was donated to WIRES, an Australian wildlife rescue nonprofit, to help aid the animals fleeing burned habitat ❀ Thank you everyone who participated in the fundraiser!

This elaborate crochet fantasy hat imagines the spirit of the forest as an elusive shapechanger, guide, and keeper of the paths. In the form of a three-eyed, antlered fox, it appears to travelers trying to find their way. Will it offer help or guide you deeper into wilderness?

A customizable soft-sculpture costume head piece, this is one crochet project that you will not be able to keep hidden in the trees! The written pattern for the main hat includes detailed instructions for all 23 amigurumi components, plus photo AND video tutorials for making all the pieces and assembling.

Written in U.S terminology

Materials & Notes

4.50 mm hook
3.75 mm hook

2 skeins Lion Brand Heartland Yosemite (#4 Worsted Weight, 251 yds / 5 oz, 100% acrylic) (Main Color – Red)
1 skein Lion Brand Heartland Great Sand Dunes (Accent Color – Beige)
1 skein Lion Brand Heartland Bryce Canyon (Accent Color – Gold)
>100 yds #4 weight accent color orange
>100 yds #4 weight accent color black
>50 yds #4 weight accent color white

> 50 yds accent fur yarn (any white or cream colored)
> 50 yds accent fur yarn (any orange) – optional

Scissors
Tapestry Needle
Polyester Fiberfill & stuffing stick
12” chenille craft pipe cleaners, 6 mm (2)
Measuring tape
Styrofoam Head form
Locking stitch markers

Gauge:

4 sts & 8 rows = 1”, or 2” in diameter after Rnd 7 in main pattern

Finished Measurements:
Main Hat: 24” circumference around the inside, 13-14” from bottom of earflap to crown

Stitches and Abbreviations:


magic ring (MR)
single crochet (sc)
slip stitch (sl st)
front loop only (FLO)
chain stitch (ch)
back loop only (BLO)
single crochet decrease (sc dec)
half-double crochet (hdc)
double crochet (dc)
treble crochet (tr)
5-wrap bullion (5-bull)- Wrap yarn around hook 5 times. Insert hook into next st, draw up a loop. Draw the same loop through each of the 5 wraps on the hook. YO and draw through last loop on the hook. (Double crochet may be substituted for this stitch)
6-wrap bullion (6-bull) – Wrap yarn around hook 6 times. Insert hook into next st. draw up a loop. Draw the same loop through each of the 6 wraps on the hook. YO and draw through last loop on the hook. (Treble crochet may be substituted for this stitch)
back post double crochet (BPDC) – double crochet worked by inserting the hook around the post of the stitch below, entering and emerging from the back (wrong side) of the work . For more help with post stitches, see my tutorial here: Post Stitch Ribbing tutorial
back post half double crochet (BPHDC) – half double crochet worked by inserting the hook around the post of the stitch below, entering and emerging from the back (wrong side) of the work.
front post double crochet (FPDC) – double crochet worked by inserting the hook around the post of the stitch below, entering and emerging from the front (right side) of the work.
front post half-double crochet (FPHDC) –  half double crochet worked by inserting the hook around the post of the stitch below, entering and emerging from the front (right side) of the work.
right side (RS)
wrong side (WS)
hook (hk)
stitch/es (st/sts)

Notes:

The circular pattern alternates rounds worked in the front and back loops of the previous round. I highly recommend using a locking marker on the back loop of the first stitch of each sc round (odd numbered rounds) so you know for sure where to start and finish – with all of those loops it can get confusing and the markers always save the day.

Working a large number of chain loops will make the hat base curl and may be hard to work with – this is normal. For help on how to handle working the main hat, please see my demo video on my Youtube channel linked below.

Video Tutorials: Video tutorials, including demos and full-length patterns for this design, can be found on my Youtube Channel here. They’re also embedded in the instructions on the blog below!

Main Hat Instructions

To Begin, make magic ring with Main Color and a 4.50 mm hook.

Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring, join round with a sl st in the front loop of the first stitch. Pull the ring closed tightly. – 6 sts

Rnd 2: Working in the FLO of Rnd 1 (Ch 9, *sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt  5 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 6 ch loops

Rnd 3: 2 sc into each of the back loops only (BLO)  of the sc stitches from Rnd 1.  Join with a sl st in the FLO. – 12 sts

Rnd 4: Working in the FLO of Rnd 3, (Ch 9. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt  11 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join – 12 ch loops

Rnd 5: In BLO of Rnd 3, (1 sc in next st, 2 sc in the next st. ) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 18 sts

Rnd 6: Working in the FLO of Rnd 5, (Ch 9. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt  17 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 18 ch loops

Rnd 7: In BLO of Rnd 5, (1 sc in each of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round – 24 sts

Rnd 8: Working in the FLO of Rnd 7, (Ch 9. *sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 23 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 24 ch loops

Rnd 9: In BLO of Rnd 7, (1 sc in each of the next 3 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 30 sts

Rnd 10:  Working in FLO of Rnd 9, (Ch 9. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 29 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 30 ch loops

Rnd 11: In BLO of Rnd 9, (1 sc in each of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 36 sts

Rnd 12: Working in FLO of Rnd 11, sc in the same stitch as sl st join. (Ch 9. *Sc in the next stitch.)  Rpt  35 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 36 ch loops

Rnd 13: In BLO of Rnd 11, (1 sc in each of the next 5 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 42 sts

Rnd 14: Working in FLO of Rnd 13,  (Ch 9. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 41 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 42 ch loops

Rnd 15: In BLO of Rnd 13, (1 sc in each of the next 6 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 48 sts

Rnd 16: Working in FLO of Rnd 15, (Ch 10. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 47 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 48 ch loops

Rnd 17: In BLO of Rnd 15, (1 sc in each of the next 7 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 54 sts

Rnd 18: Working in FLO of Rnd 17, (Ch 10.  *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 53 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 54 ch loops

Rnd 19: In BLO of Rnd 17, 1 sc in each sc around. Join with a sl st in the FL of first st in the rnd. – 54 sts

Rnd 20: Working in FLO of Rnd 19, (Ch 11. *Sl st in the next st.) Rpt 53 more times, ending last rpt at *. Do not join. – 54 ch lps

Rnd 21: In BLO of Rnd 19, (1 sc in each of the next 8 sts, 2 sc in next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 60 sts

Rnd 22: Working in FLO of Rnd 21, (Ch 11. *Sl st in the next stitch.)  Rpt 59 more times, ending last rpt at *.   Do not join. – 60 ch loops

Rnd 23: In BLO of Rnd 21, sc in each stitch around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 60 sts

Rnd 24: Working in FLO of Rnd 23, (Ch 11. *Sl st in the next stitch.) Rpt 59 more times, ending last rpt at *. Do not join. – 60 ch loops

Rnd 25: Working in BLO of Rnd 23, (1 sc in ea of the next 9 sts, 2 sc in the next st.) Rpt around. Join with a sl st in the FL of the first st of the rnd. – 66 sts

Rnd 26: Working in the FLO of Rnd 25, (Ch 11. *Sl st in the next stitch.) Rpt 65 more times, ending last rpt at *. Do not join. – 66 ch loops

Rnd 27: In BL of previous rnd, sc in each stitch around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 66 sts

Rnd 28: Working in FLO of previous rnd, (Ch 12. *Sl st in the next stitch.) Rpt 65 more times, ending last rpt at *. Do not join. – 66 ch loops

Rnds 29-42: Rpt Rnds 27-28 7 more times.

Rnd 43: In BL of previous rnd, sc in each stitch around. Join with a sl st in the FLO of first st in the round. – 66 sts

Rnd 44: Working in FLO of previous rnd, (Ch 13. *Sl st in the next st.) Rpt 65 more times, ending alst rpt at *. Do not join.

Rnds 45 – 52: Rpt Rnds 43-44 4 more times. Sl st in the next st.  Do not tie off – leave yarn attached to begin working earflaps.

Earflaps (Make 2)

Get four locking stitch markers. Place one in the BL of the first stitch of the previous round. Place second marker 9 stitches from the first (counting in same direction as you would work the round). Including stitches with markers, this makes a 10-stitch section. Starting with the first stitch after the 2nd marker, count 19 stitches in the same direction you would work the round. Place the third marker in the back loop of the 19 stitch. Place 4th marker 9 stitches from the third.

This leaves you with two marked off sections of 10 stitches (where you will work the earflaps) with an 18-stitch gap on one side (the back of the hat) and a 28-stitch gap on the other side (the front of the hat).  You can try on the hat now to see where those sections fall and adjust if necessary – as long as you have two sections of 10 stitches you can place them where you like.

Earflaps are worked in rows, turning after each row. Every row is worked in the back loop only.

Row 1: RS facing, join with a sc to the marked st at the beginning of one marked off 10-st section. 1 sc into the BLO of ea of next 9 sts. Ch 13, turn.

Row 2: Working in the BLO, sl st in next st. (Ch 13, * sl st in the next st) 9 more times, ending last rpt at *. Turn – 10 ch loops

Row 3: In the BLO, sc in ea of the next 10 sts. Ch 13, turn.

Row 4: Rpt Row 2.

Row 5: Rpt Row 3.

Row 6: Rpt Row 2.

Row 7: To begin this row, work a sc decrease over the BL of the first 2 stitches. Sc in ea of the next 6 sts. Work a sc decrease over the next 2 stitches. Ch 13, turn. – 8 sts.

Row 8: Sl st in the next st. (Ch 13, * sl st in the next st) 7 times, ending last rpt at *. Ch 13, turn. –  8 ch loops.

Row 9: Sc in ea of the next 8 sts. Ch 13, turn. – 8 sts

Row 10: Rpt Row 8.

Row 11: To begin this row, work a sc decrease over the BL of the first 2 sts. Sc in ea of the next 4 sts. Work a sc decrease over the next 2 sts. Ch 13, turn. – 6 sts

Row 12: Sl st in the next st. (Ch 13, *sl st in the next st) 5 times, ending last rpt at *. Turn. – 6 ch loops

Row 13: Work a sc decrease over the next 2 sts. Sc in ea of next 2 sts. 1 sc dec over the next 2 sts. Ch 13, turn. – 4 sts

Row 14: Sl st in the next st. (Ch 13, *sl st in the same st) 3 times, ending last rpt at *. Turn. – 4 ch loops

Row 15: (Work a sc dec over the next 2 sts) twice. If this is your first earflap, cut yarn and tie off. If this is your second earflap, do not cut or tie off.

Brim:

The brim works three rows of sc in each stitch around the edge of the hat, including the earflaps. Continue using yarn still attached from the 2nd earflap.

Row 1: Work 1 sc in the side of ea row down the earflap toward the main part of the hat. Continue to work 1 sc in the back loops of the stitches and 1 sc in between ea loop on the sides of the earflaps all the way around the hat.

Row 2: Sc in ea sc.

Row 3: Sc in ea sc.

Details Instructions

Fox Ears (Make 2):

Worked in the round, placing marker in the first stitch of every round to keep track.

With 4.50 hook and #4 black yarn, make magic ring.

Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring. Pull the ring closed tightly. – 6 sts

Rnd 2: *1 sc in the next st, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 9 sts

Rnd 3: *1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 12 sts

Rnd 4: *1 sc in ea of the next 3 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 15 sts

Rnd 5: *1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 18 sts

Rnd 6: *1 sc in ea of the next 5 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 21 sts

Rnd 7: *1 sc in ea of the next 6 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 24 sts

Rnd 8: *1 sc in ea of the next 7 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 27 sts

Rnd 9: *1 sc in ea of the next 8 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 30 sts

Rnd 10: *1 sc in ea of the next 9 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 33 sts

Rnd 11: *1 sc in ea of the next 10 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 36 sts

Rnd 12: *1 sc in ea of the next 11 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 39 sts

Rnd 13: *1 sc in ea of the next 12 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. -42 sts

Rnd 14: *1 sc in ea of the next 13 sts, 2 sc in the next st* around. – 45 sts

Rnds 15 – 19: 1 sc in ea st around. – 45 sts.

Cut yarn and tie off.

Ear Trim:

The ear is flattened to later fit on the hat – flatten the ear and fold it inward to get an idea.  Video demo available below.

Row 1: To trim the ear, use the 4.50 mm hook to attach the fur accent yarn a few stitches inward from the edge, starting at the bottom. Slip stitch on the surface of the piece, staying a few stitches inward from the edge, toward the tip of the ear.

Once a few stitches from the top, turn and slip stitch back down the other side in the same manner.

Row 2: Ch 1, turn and slip stitch in ea of the slip stitches just made in the first Row.

Row 3 (Optional): I did a third line of slip stitching inward from the first, using a different fur yarn, to add more texture. Work across the bottom of the ear for the 3rd row.

TIP: Use a pet brush or wig brush to tease out the hair on the fur yarn to make the texture softer!

Antlers:

Main Tine (Make 2):

Worked continuously in the round, place marker in the first stitch of every round to keep track. Video tutorial available below.


With 3.75 hook and #4 accent color beige, make magic ring.

Rnd 1: 3 sc into the ring. Pull the ring closed tightly. – 3 sts

Rnd 2: 1 sc in the next st, 2 sc in the next st, 1 sc in the next st. – 4 sts

Rnd 3: 1 sc in ea st. – 4 sts

Rnd 4: Rpt rnd 3

Rnd 5: 1 sc in the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in the next st. – 5 sts

Rnd 6: 1 sc in ea st. – 5 sts

Rnd 7: Rpt rnd 6

Rnd 8: 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts. – 6 sts

Rnd 9: 1 sc in ea st. – 6 sts

Rnds 10-11: Rpt Rnd 9.

Rnd 12: *2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts. Rpt from * once more. – 8 sts.

Rnd 13: 1 sc in ea st. – 8 sts

Rnds 14-15: Rpt Rnd 13

Rnd 16: 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 3 sts. – 9 sts

Rnd 17: 1 sc in ea st. – 9 sts

Rnds 18 – 19: Rpt Rnd 17

Rnd 20: 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts. – 10 sts

Rnd 21: 1 sc in ea  st. – 10 sts

Rnds 22 – 30: Rpt Rnd 21

Rnd 31: 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next st. – 12 sts

Rnd 32: 1 sc in ea st. – 12 sts.

Slip stitch in the next few stitches to finish. Cut yarn and tie off leaving a long tail for sewing.

2nd Tine (Make 2):

Work Rounds 1 – 14 of the Main Tine. Sl st in the next few sts to finish after Rnd 14, cut yarn and tie off leaving a long tail for sewing.

3rd Tine (Make 2):


Work Rounds 1 – 12 of the Main Tine. Sl st in the next few sts to finish after Rnd 12, cut yarn and tie off leaving a long tail for sewing.

4th Tine (Make 2):

Work Rounds 1 – 10 of the Main Tine. Sl st in the next few sts to finish after Rnd 10, cut yarn and tie off leaving a long tail for sewing.

Antler Video Tutorial:

Antler Construction:

Video demo available below.

With polyester fiberfill and stick, stuff a tiny bit of filling in the tip of the Main Tine. Take one 12” 6mm pipe cleaner and fold in half, twisting loose ends together to form a flat loop. Insert twisted end into the Main tine, leaving a small bit of loop sticking out of the opening. Gently fill the bottom part of the Main Tine around the wire armature with poly fill. Roll and massage the piece to even out the filling – do not overstuff! It should still be flexible and posable on the armature.

Gently stuff the 2nd tine with a small amount of fiberfill. With tapestry needle, thread long yarn tail of the 2nd Tine. Position about halfway up the Main Tine and sew around the base of the 2nd tine.

Gently stuff the 3rd tine with a small amount of fiberfill.  With tapestry needle, thread long yarn tail of the 3rd tine and position at the base of the Main Tine. Sew the tine so that the base is partially attached. Leave about half of the base free to attach to the hat along with the base of the Main Tine.

Gently stuff the 4th tine with a tiny amount of fiberfill. Leave this tine free, it is attached to the Hat separately later.

Antler Construction Demo Video

Snout:

Snout is constructed by working four triangular shapes back and forth separately onto the same circle, adding seams at the end. Ch 1 at beginning of rnd does not count as first sc.

With Beige and 3.75 hook, make magic ring.

1st quarter:

Rnd 1: 8 sc into the ring. Join with a slip stitch in the first sc of the round.

Row 2: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 2 sc in the next st. – 4 sts

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 2 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 6 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 8 sts

Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 6 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 10 sts

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 8 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 12 sts

Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 10 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 14 sts

Row 8: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 12 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 16 sts

Row 9: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 14 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 18 sts

Row 10: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 16 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 20 sts

Row 11: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 18 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 22 sts

Row 12: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 20 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 24 sts

Rows 13 -14: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 24 sts

Cut yarn and tie off.

2nd & 3rd Quarter:

With Gold, join yarn in either set of two stitches adjacent to the 1st quarter.

Row 1: Ch 1, 2 sc in the next st. 2 sc in the next st. – 4 sts

Row 2: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 4 sts

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in the next 2 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 6 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 6 sts

Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 8 sts.

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 8 sts

Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 6 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 10 sts

Row 8: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 10 sts

Rows 9 – 14: Rpt Row 8. – 10 sts

Cut yarn and tie off. Rpt for 3rd quarter on the other side of 1st.

4th Quarter (Top of snout)


With Main color, join yarn in first of remaining 2 sc.

Row 1: Ch 1, 2 sc in the same st, 2 sc in the next st. – 4 sc

Row 2: Ch 1, 1 sc in ea st. – 4 sc

Row 3: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in the next 2 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 6 sts

Row 4: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 6 sts

Row 5: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 8 sts.

Row 6: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 8 sts

Row 7: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 6 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 10 sts

Row 8: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 10 sts

Row 9: Ch 1, turn. 2 sc in the same st. 1 sc in ea of the next 8 sts. 2 sc in the last st. – 12 sts

Row 10: Ch 1, turn. 1 sc in ea st. – 12 sts

Rows 11-14: Rpt Row 10

Do not tie off.

Snout Construction:

Video demo available.


Match the edge of the sides (2nd and 3rd quarter) to the top of the snout (4th quarter) and work a single crochet over the end stitch of both layers at once. Work 1 sc per row end across the edge to create a seam. Turn, work 2 slip stitches across the tip, then continue seam down the other side. Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

With accent color beige, repeat the process on the other side connecting the bottom (1st quarter) to the sides (2nd and 3rd quarter). Work 1 sc stitch per row end across the edge to create a seam. Turn, work 2 slip stitches across the tip, then continue seam down the other side. Cut yarn and tie off.

Nose:

With 3.75 hook and accent color Black, chain 10.

Row 1: 4 hdc in the 2nd ch from the hook. 1 hdc in ea of the next 3 ch sts. 4 hdc in the next st. 1 hdc in ea of the next 3 sts. 4 hdc in the next st. Slip stitch in the opposite side of the chain stitch 5 stitches away.

Row 2: Sc in the back loop only (BLO) of the first st of the previous round. Working in the BLO, sc in ea stitch around. Join with a slip stitch to the first sc of the round.

Cut yarn and tie off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Eyes (Make 3):

(Pictured above clockwise from left – Eye without finishing, 3rd eye with finishing, Left Eye with finishing)

The Eyes feature the bullion stitch, an advanced crochet stitch described in the stitches section. For help working this stitch, see my video tutorials, linked in the Notes section. If you do not want to tackle bullion, regular crochet stitches can be substituted. Substitute double crochet for the 5-bullion stitch and treble crochet for the 6-bullion stitch.

With 3.75 hook and accent color black, make magic ring.

Rnd 1: 2 sc, 1 hdc, 2 dc, 1 hdc, 2 sc, 1 hdc, 2 dc, 1 hdc into the ring. Sl st in first sc to join. Pull ring closed tightly. Cut yarn and tie off.

With accent color gold, join yarn in last st worked. Ch 3 to start.

Rnd 2: Work 2 5-bull sts in the first 4 sts. (2 6-bull, ch 1, 2 6-bull) in the next st. Work 2 5-bull sts in the next 5 sts. (2 6-bull, ch 1, 2 6-bull) in the next st. Work 2 5-bull sts in the next st. Sl st to join. Cut yarn and tie off.

Brow – Left eye:

With Wrong Side facing, attach black yarn three sts away from the 6-bull increase of either end of the eye.

Row 1: Sc in the same st. Sc in the next 2 sts. In the next ch space, work 3 hdc. 1 hdc in ea of the next 6 sts. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Row 2: Turn piece. With Right Side facing, attach beige yarn 4 stitches away from the end of the brow – attach new yarn around post of 4th from last stitch. Ch 3. 1 Back Post Double Crochet (BPDC) in the same st. 1 BPDC in ea of the next 8 sts. 1 Back Post Half Double Crochet (BPHDC) in ea of the next 4 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Brow – Right eye:

With Right side Facing, attach black yarn three sts away from the 6-bull increase of either end of the eye.

Row 1: Sc in the same st. Sc in the next 2 sts. In the next ch space work 3 hdc. 1 hdc in ea of the next 6 sts. 1 dc in ea of the next 4 sts. 2 dc in ea of the next 2 sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

Row 2: Turn piece. With Wrong Side facing, attach beige yarn 4 sts away from the end of the brow – attach new yarn around post of the 4th from last st. Ch 3. 1 Front Post Double Crochet (FPDC) in the same st. 1 FPDC in ea of the next 8 sts. 1 Fack Post Half Double Crochet (FPHDC) in ea of the next 4  sts. Cut yarn and tie off.

 3rd Eye:

With Main Color, Join yarn in any stitch. 1 sc in each stitch around. In the chain space at the first point, work 2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc. Continue to single crochet to next point. Work 3 sc in the chain space. Continue to sc around, join with a sl st to first sc of the round.

Crescent Moon:

With Accent color White and 3.75 hook, ch 9.

In the 2nd ch from the hook, 2 sc. 2 hdc in ea of the next 2 ch sts. 3 dc in the next ch st. 2 hdc in ea of the next 2 ch sts. 2 sc in the next st. Sl st in the next st. Cut yarn and tie off.

Back Markings:


With 3.75 hk and Gold, Ch 40

2 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook. 2 dc in ea of the next 9 ch sts. 1 dc in ea of the next 9 sts. 3 dc in the next st. 2 dc in the next st.  1 dc in ea of the next 9 sts. 2 dc in ea of the next 10 sts.  Cut yarn and tie off.

With same hook and yarn, make magic ring.

Ch 3. 12 dc into the ring – tighten. Join with a sl st in first dc of the round.  Repeat for 2nd circle.

Fang:

With 3.75 mm hook and accent color white, follow Rounds 1-4 of the Main Tine. Cut yarn and tie off.

Braids:

Cut 48 30” long strands. Separate into 2 groups of 24, double up to form a loop and loop through the end of each earflap on any available loop, or directly into the crochet stitching if you prefer. Braid and tie off.

Assembly:

It’s okay and even preferable if you trap a lot of loops under the sewing for your detail pieces. Work slowly and conscientiously to get the loops and pieces arranged nicely.
The demo video for assembly is condensed at 25 times faster the speed I did it – it took me over 3 hours to assemble this! Take your time, but don’t be focused on getting it absolutely perfect because it won’t be.
Your hat will have a character of it’s own!

Using locking stitch markers, head form and tape measure, attach the components to the main hat. Start by centering the snout (nose already sewn on) so that the beige edge matches up against the brim on the center above the face. Stitch all components directly over the chain loops, making sure the securing thread attaches all the way down to the base of the hat, not just to the loops.  Next tackle the 3rd eye, then tack on the other two eyes (don’t recommend sewing them on fully yet).

After the eyes are positioned and partially attached, arrange the ears and tack them on using temporary securing methods such as locking stitch markers, safety pins, or tied yarn.

Next, position your main antlers – insert the pipe cleaner loop at the base of the antler all the way through the stitches on the base of the main hat so that you can grab the wire loop on the underside. Using the main color, thread yarn through this loop and secure the pipe cleaner to the surrounding stitches, then weave yarn over this base to cover it.

If all components look more or less aligned (I recommend looking from many angles and utilizing your tape measure A LOT) you can finish securing the eyes, ears, and antlers using the attached yarn tails. Use your yarn tension and stitches to make little adjustments to placement as you go if needed.

Then position the 4th tines, stuffed lightly if desired, on either side of the 3rd eye. The Crescent is placed below the 3rd eye and the fangs underneath the snout on the inside of the bottom seam. The back designs go on last.

With accent color yarns and a tapestry needle, make a few overlapping straight stitches down the center of the eye to give it shine.

Once all components are attached, weave in any remaining ends.

Assembly Video

The following video records my assembly process for this piece – it takes a while! The video is sped up at 25 times the normal rate, so while it isn’t great at being a tutorial, hopefully it gives an overall idea of how to go about putting it all together. Plus, it was fun for me to watch. BTW I’m wearing the Gnome Toboggan hat in this video πŸ˜‰

Fringe Fur:

With Beige, cut a large bundle of 6” strands. Carve out a rounded cheek silhouette in the chain loops on the side of the hat, making a furrow to mark where you will fringe. Taking 2 strands at a time, loop the fringe into the chain loops and tighten, working along the loops on the furrow marked out. Repeat on the other side. – 25 (ish) fringe tassels each side should do it.

Repeat this process with accent color Orange, positioning over the top of the beige – 15-20 fringe tassels

Repeat with Main color, underneath the beige, centered on the earflap – 15 fringe tassels.

Give the fox a haircut – trim the β€œfur” until it is the length you want. Look over your new masterpiece and make any little adjustments, squishing the chain loops into their final places around the face features, etc. Spray block with water if desired.

This project was a really fun journey into shapes and textures that I hope others will customize and invent upon ❀

There are several elements in the costume for this piece I’d like to mention specifically: the skirt is sewn by me from upcycled fabric cut from unusable old clothes. The fingerless gloves are a modified version of my Rambler’s Mitts.

The fringed leather bag is also handmade by me, constructed from upcycled suede scraps crocheted together with cotton thread, with a hand sewn stone setting in the front.

The gorgeously magical moth clip is from the Etsy Shop The Forest Fae ❀

I’ve watched too many internet videos of foxes jumping to not do this.

-MF

Amanita Muscaria Mushroom Pouch

Maybe creepy poison fungus seems more like an autumn thing, but there is some argument for the seasonality of the crochet project I have to share today!

It wasn’t meant to be seasonal – I created the Amanita Mushroom Pouch tutorial & free crochet pattern because I had requests to make a pattern for the above older photos from my Jack-O-Lantern and Morel Mushroom pouch blog posts. But since we’re on the subject, here’s an article about the connection of amanitas to winter tradition in Northern Europe and Russia. I’ve read other articles in the past, making wilder and less well-researched claims, which are fun if speculative.

Whether or not you buy that some of our holiday traditions are derived from hallucinating on mushroom toxins, the Amanita Muscaria Mushroom Pouch is a pretty cute little project to make curled up inside on a winter’s day, and look adorable tucked in the branches of the tree ❀

I’ve been making these for a few years and I’m glad to have finally created a pattern for them πŸ™‚ Happily, I have BOTH a written pattern and a video tutorial (see my Youtube Channel or find it at the end of the pattern below)! Huzzah!

Amanita Muscaria Mushroom Pouch

Materials:
4.5 mm Hook
#4 Worsted weight yarn in white and red
Tapestry needle
Scissors

Stem Instructions:
Make Magic Ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc into the ring.
Rnd 2: 2 sc in ea st – 12 sts
Rnd 3: Working in back loop only, 1 sc in ea st around – 12 sts in BLO
Rnd 4: *Sc in the next 2 sc, sc2tog. Rpt around – 9 sts
Rnds 5-6: 1 sc in ea sc.

Rnd 7: Working in the back loop only (BLO), 1 sc in ea sc


Rnd 8: Working in the front loop only left from Rnd 7, *1 hdc and 1 sc in the next st, 1 sc in the next st. Rpt around.


Rnd 9: Skipping over Rnd 8 and continuing into the sc stitches of Rnd 7, 1 sc in ea sc.
Rnds 10-13: 1 sc in ea sc around

Sl st in the next few sts, do not tie off. Begin crochet chain loop. Chain 100-125. Once chain is complete, slip stitch on the opposite side of the stem from the beginning of the chain. Add a few more slip sts around to secure. Cut yarn and tie off.

Cap Instructions:

With red yarn, make Magic Ring.
Rnd 1: Ch 2. 10 hdc into the ring.
Rnd 2: Ch 2. 1 hdc in the same st. 2 hdc in the next st. *1 hdc in the next st, 2 hdc in the next st. Rpt around


Rnds 3-4: 1 hdc in ea st around.
Rnd 5: 1 sc in ea st around.

Sl st in the next few sts to secure, then cut yarn and tie off. Weave in all ends on the stem and cap using a tapestry needle and scissors.

With a length of white yarn, thread the tapestry needle. Insert needle from under the cap to the top, leaving some tail for sewing in. The spots are made from working french knots, an embroidery technique that wraps yarn around the embroidery needle before completing the stitch. For instructions on this part, see the video at 17:00.

Video Tutorial

Also, for fun, here’s me in an Amanita Muscaria Mushroom hat, which is made with french knots bespeckling my Sweetheart Beret crochet pattern, a.k.a the Forest Girl Beret ( the antlered version).

Well, that’s all the pictures of yarn mushrooms I’ve got… Just kidding, it isn’t. But that’s all I’m going to cram into this post. I hope you all have a super safe and lovely holiday season ❀

-MF

Lotus Duster Tutorial Part 3

Tippy-top on my to-do list is finishing the Lotus Duster video tutorial, in no small part because I’m getting very excited about seeing the finished product! You can find Parts 1 & 2 on my Youtube Channel here.

Each time I make a new one, I fall in love with it all over again ❀ I mean, not to toot my own horn or anything πŸ˜‰ So putting together Part 3 of this video was very rewarding, because in Rnds 17 – 24 we are adding armholes and really starting to shape the central mandala into the pretty ruffley sweater form.

This material is looking like a soft doily dream – it’s the 100% cotton yarn, in fine stranded texture, ripped out from a number of old thrifted sweaters. Recycling sweater yarn is a lot of hard work, but it’s hard to beat in terms of quality, quantity, and overall cost for these Duster pieces, and nothing gives the piece a more retro vintage-y feel than upcycled yarn.

Okay, blathering completed – enjoy Part 3 and remember to like & subscribe, link me, and share me on Facebook if you want to support more slick FREE content πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

❀ ❀

-MF

Pattern Gallery: The Krampus Collection

Though I’ve mostly drifted away from doing collections of themed patterns on the blog, I had to come out of retirement when I saw a few new Krampus fiber art goodies floating around the internet this season!

This fun and silly tradition has gained so much popularity in the United States recently, and as I mentioned in my original Krampus Hat post, my hometown hosts one of the most established Krampus Parades in the country every year. I’m proud to know some of the awesome people who help put it on!

I didn’t get to make the parade this year, so in compensation I’m offering a dose of Krampus via the awesome patterns and projects that I’ve spied recently: enjoy the Krampus Collection, with the links to the original artists and patterns below!

  1. Krampus Hat by Morale Fiber:

    Of course, I’m going to go ahead and get myself out of the way here! This is my Krampus Hat pattern from a few years ago, which actually was originally a goat/lamb hat pattern before it got a makeover! This super thick textured hat is achieved by making tons of tiny chain loops – a process you can see via my Youtube demo video. You can find the pattern for FREE on my blog here.

2. Krampus by Christina Staley

This AWESOME Krampus amigurumi figure is crocheted with worsted weight yarn and comes out to be an impressive 20″ tall! He has all the extras included, like chains, scary tongue, and sack for collecting naughty children – you can get the pattern via Ravelry here.

3. Krampus Hat by Linsday Scarey

One for the bistitchuals out there! This gorgeous and classy Krampus hat uses multi-strand knitting (something I’ve always been too intimidated to try) to create a ring of prancing christmas monsters around the crown of this superb and comfy looking beanie. Pattern is available for FREE via Ravelry here.

4. Krampus Christmas Ornament by Ann D’Angelo

Love Krampus but don’t have a lot of extra crafting time on your hands? This little amigurumi ornament can grace your tree in no time, and the pattern is available for just a couple bucks from Ravelry here. I love his cranky little face! The pattern even includes little “victims” – adorable πŸ™‚

5. Krampus by Sonia Childers

You guys, I almost peed my pants in excitement when I saw this awesome Krampus hat by Sonia Childers in her Ravelry Store. Look at the awesomeness! It even has a beard! And a nose warmer! She has a bunch of other amazing hat patterns as well, but I really would love to make this one sometime, and even maybe mesh some of her elements with some from my Krampus hat pattern – so cool Sonia! You rock!

6. Gruss Vom Krampus by Stephanie Pokorny

Last but not least (and unfortunately not a pattern) is the incredible Gruss vom Krampus costume made by Stephanie Pokorny of the inimitable Crochetverse. Guys, look at those teeth. Most Krampus patterns are kinda cute too but this one actually gives me the willies, which is the highest accomplishment a Krampus crochet project can achieve in my opinion! You can find the original post for this project on Facebook here, and you should definitely like and follow the Crochetverse page if you haven’t already because she does incredible stuff like this ALL. THE. TIME.

I hope this collection inspires you to crochet something awesome, or at least to not be too naughty this season πŸ˜‰ Thanks for visiting!

-MF

Embla Vest Pattern

It can be awfully hard to pinpoint where an idea began it’s journey toward fruition. I’ve wanted to design my own tree of life motif for years, and finally picked up a hook to start experimenting with it just a few months ago. I vaguely thought about adding the motif to the middle of the vest design I was working on, and so I tinkered until this was possible and set down a general framework for the pattern. Today I finally finish this saga, with the premier of the Embla Vest crochet pattern – available as a downloadable, printable, ad-free PDF in my Etsy Shop and Ravelry Store ❀

During the making of this pattern, life happened, and then death happened. In the course of this, the Embla Vest became very personal to me (more so than other designs, although it’s hard to judge) and getting through the process of creating this pattern became a journey of emergence. I’m so glad I’m here now! Ha πŸ™‚

The vest design itself was inspired by several stylistic sources including steampunk waistcoats and some of my personal crochet heroes’ designs, and I made SO MANY of them before I settled on what looked accurate to the vision in my mind’s eye. The resulting design is the new award winner for Most Drafts Crocheted, a title formerly held by the Ida Shawl (worth it in both cases!)

Yes, there was struggle and heartache. Through it all, I kept creating – because there isn’t any other way. I hope you love this design as much as I do, and I hope you make it for someone you love and they love it, too ❀ Read on for the full details!

The Embla Vest is a playful and versatile garment inspired by the Norse creation myth, in which the gods breath life into a dead tree to create the first woman, named Embla. I drew from many different design elements to create this unique and customizable piece of wearable crochet art.

This circular vest is worked in the round, featuring a stunning Tree of Life motif in the center and blends beautifully outwards in #4 worsted weight variegated yarn to make the perfect lightweight layering piece.

In addition to the FIVE sizes (XS-XL) this vest features lots of customizing options, including instructions for a solid back (alternative or in addition to the Tree of Life), sleeves, and hood! Create a structured, waistcoat look by working the buttons instructions, or make a fairy tail cardigan featuring a lace-up front. All sizes and styles fit with a wrapping collar, a dainty pointed back, and front panels that draw away in a figure taper.

The PDF file includes written instructions for every size in step-by-step order with stitch counts and 75+ bright, clear tutorial photos. The Embla Vest PDF also comes with the Tree of Life mandala, a separate BONUS PDF file for the full Tree of Life dreamcatcher design (also available here on the blog).

Materials:
4.5 mm hook
Lion Brand Shawl in a Cake or Shawl in a Ball (#4 weight, 150 g, 481 yds)
Main Vest: 1, 1, 1, 2, 2 skeins
Hood: Β½ Β skein
Sleeves: 1 skein
Tree Motif – 50 yds Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton (#4 weight, 100 g / 186 yds)
Scissors
Tapestry Needle
Stitch Markers

Sizes and Finished Measurements: X-Small (XS), Small (SM), Medium (MD), Large (LG), X-Large (XL)
Finished measurements are approximate
Bust: Β 30”, 34”, 38”, 42”, 46”
Length (back collar to bottom point): 19”, 21”, 23”, 25”, 27”
Arm Opening (circumference): 9”, 10”, 11”, 12”, 13”

All instructions are written in English in U.S terminology.

I have real bits of bark on my sleeve. That’s authenticity.

In the outdoor photoshoot I am proud to be sporting 100% handmade/small business apparel – here’s where it’s all from!
Floral Berry Crown: @daizel_doozle
Hi-Lo Scrunchie Dress: Elven Forest
Tie-Dye Yoga Pants: Dimples Dyes
Macrame necklace & bracelet: Selinofos Art

The sleeved vest costume also includes a piece by Dimples Dyes (halter top) and Selinofos Art (Pendant necklace). And more by me (crocheted leather feather head wrap)

And of course, in several of these photos I’m also wearing one of my one-of-a-kind pixie belts, which you can get all the how-to instructions for FREE here on my blog.

Now, go out there, make some stuff, and hug a tree.

❀ ❀ ❀

-MF