Pattern Help & Support

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Questions regarding my pay patterns (or any of my patterns really!) can be posted here in the comments.

As of right now I am online and available almost every day, and if I can’t answer your question immediately I will make it my top priority to do so. Thank you so much for supporting me by buying my patterns!

-MF

318 thoughts on “Pattern Help & Support

  1. Hi regina, I am working on your elf coat pattern and my hood isnt matching up to the body of the sweater. I made it in small size and the hood sides end just past the shoulder seams… should I try bumping up the good a size? Would that fix it? My counts are all correct.
    Thanks, christy

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    • Hi Christy! You could definitely add more rows to the hood in order to get it to reach further along the collar of your coat, but I’m curious as to why it’s not matching up – if you would be interested in sending me a picture via my FB business page, I’d love to take a look! If not, I can say that counting the number of rows to seam up the hood can be tricky, and it’s very easy to miscount the number of rows seamed (due to increases and stretch on the sides of the hood, etc) so that would be the first place I would look for what went awry. If you won’t want to add more rows to the hood, you could always unseam a few rows down on the back of the hood to allow it to reach further across the collar.

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  2. Hi! I’m working on the elf coat, and I’ve just finished putting everything together but the hood, and I found that the coat sits on me in a way that it won’t close regularly. Is there anything I can do to make it close like a regular, comfortable coat?

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    • Hi Ania – do you mean that the coat isn’t closing across the front? If so, you can add extra rows of the front border that is added on after you attach the hood to give the garment more coverage across the front. If you are having problems with the fit, I would double check your hood proportions as well before actually sewing it on πŸ™‚

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  3. Hallo
    I like this elf coat and would like to knit in size S (I cannot croching….
    ) Is there any possibility to get the knitting pattern? It would be gerat

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  4. Hello, I am making the Krampus hat and I was wondering if I could make the horns curve around the ears instead of pointing back and up. Thank you for your amazing patterns and your amazing work.

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    • Hi Kasey! I don’t have an exact idea on how to do this, but it’s definitely possible πŸ™‚ Part of what makes the horns curve is the placement of different heights of stitches on each round. So, after you have worked the first set of rounds that make the horns curve by alternating hdc, sc, and slip stitches, you may want to try working all the rounds in the same height of stitch. This will help straighten it out after you get the amount of curve you want.
      There are also a few other styles of crochet horns out there on the internet, you may want to try a search – the kind of horn you are looking for may already have a pattern written for it. πŸ™‚

      Good luck!

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  5. Hi! I just purchased the Valkyrie top and I see there is no size difference for small or medium. Was this an error in the pattern, or purposeful? The small sizing is a bit too small on me, and I’m wondering if you have any suggestions?

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    • Hi Amanda! The size difference between the small and the medium is evident in the cups, but not the length of the top itself. So the small works single crochet stitches across the cups, while the Medium works half double crochet across the cups, which results in more bust room on the Medium size. Since the top is adjustable through the way it is tied, I did not feel like the medium needed extra room length-wise. If you need more length but less bust, you can modify the Large size – I would be happy to tell you how, just let me know πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ Thanks!

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  6. Hi! I’m making your Krampus hat, and I’ve made some substitutions. Firstly, I have some crochet hooks I inherited and didn’t have the budget to get all the hooks that you list. I made the main hat in a #4 worsted cotton, with a 5mm hook. It fits well, and I’m about to make the horns in acrylic, but I have a 3.5 hook. My questions are as follows:

    1) Do I cut and tie off the brim before I start working on the horns?

    2) Is there a gauge I should follow for the horns?

    I personally am going to make this hat once more when I get the right hooks. I really love this pattern. Thank you!

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    • Hi Doria! Great questions. You can cut and tie off the brim if you are ready to work the horns and ears, you are done with the hat portion at that point of the pattern. For the Horns, I don’t have a specific gauge written down for them, but since you are stuffing them and standing them up you want to work them as tight as you can πŸ™‚ I’ll make a note to get a gauge for this part of the project next time I work it!

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  7. Hi, Regina,
    I’m working on the Hedge Witch Hat (OMG, LOVE) and I’m a little stuck on the backward switchback join.
    I see in the pics that you have the hook going through the BLO of the first stich of that round but then the next pic is of it done. How, exactly, do I grab that loop? Do I take my hook out and come at it from behind?
    I’ve been doing what I think is the right thing and my hat seam is not as smooth and pretty as yours is in the photos of the hat pattern.
    Many thanks!
    H

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    • Hi Holly! Yes, you must remove your hook from the loop that is currently on it, and then insert the hook through the BLO of the next st (from the front of the work, to the back is how I normally do it). Then, you can catch the loop you dropped and pull it through that back loop πŸ™‚ It does take a few tries to get your tension to where it needs to be so that the seam looks smooth. Does that make more sense?

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  8. Gotcha. I was taking the hook out and going through the BLO from the back but I will try it again with these instructions instead. I need to make another one anyway as the first is always a bit wonky, like the first pancake, and make it a bit bigger in circumference as this one just sits on the top of my head and falls off. I find that funny because I think I have a wee little pea head….. Thanks!!

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  9. Hi there! I adore your Elf coat pattern, but unfortunately I live in a very warm climate and would have little use for a coat. I was wondering if it would be possible to alter it with a lighter weight yarn to make it a lighter, airy lace robe?

    I imagine using single crochet would work better than tunisian stitch for this, and probably wouldn’t want to go down more than one category, to sport weight. Sticking with the same hook size would hopefully keep the gauge the same or close, while also making the stitches looser to give it a more lacy look.

    All that said, I’m somewhat of a beginner and would very much appreciate your input on this! Especially about tunisian vs single crochet, as I’d love an excuse to learn tunisian.

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    • Hi Nicole! That’s a very interesting question, I’m glad you asked! If you did choose to make this in Tunisian crochet, I would say you might even be able to get away with a fine weight yarn if you watched your gauge closely, although it’s hard to say just by weight category. But you could definitely achieve a lighter piece by using a lighter yarn, using the same hook or maybe even a larger one. Tunisian crochet itself is pretty thick by nature, unless you are using a lace stitch, which this coat does not. Though again, if you used a lighter weight yarn and kept a loose gauge you could probably achieve what you want to accomplish in Tunisian.

      If I were you, I would try to do a gauge swatch in Tunisian for this coat, using a sport weight yarn (cotton is probably your friend for this) and then, try out a fine weight yarn too, for comparison. Single crochet would also work well and I’ve seen a lot of people converting this pattern to single crochet and the results look great – so really you have a lot of choices! I think trying out a couple different ways of working it before you actually start is going to give you a better idea of what you are signing up for. I’m not much for pre-planning when I start a project (believe it or not lol) but in this case I think you won’t regret testing a few options before you jump in πŸ™‚ And of course if you come up with more questions you know where to find me!

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  10. Hi there! I’m working on your Elf Coat, and I just had a question. I wanted to make this for a few of my friends as well, but I will need to make a couple that are one or two sizes larger than the large. What tips do you have for adjusting the sizes of this coat? I’m not quite sure how I would go about this.
    Thanks!
    Kyrstie

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    • Hi Kyrstie! All the current written sizes are based off of the math formed by the number of panels in the skirt. A Small has 9, a Medium has 11, a Large has 13 – so to start, an XL would need 15 wedges. For the waistband, each wedge has 14 stitches worked into the top once they are all sewn together – so the waistband for an XL would have 210 stitches. From there, you can follow the math described above each piece for the front and back panels (see the original SMALL size pattern on the blog – each section has a brief description of how the math is begun for that portion). If you need additional help, the PDF pattern file has all sizes written as one pattern, so the changes are given for each different size and it can be easier to see that way how one might modify it to get bigger by following the sequence of pattern changes and extrapolating the math to figure out what an XL or larger might be.

      It’s not the easiest pattern to convert, but it can be done πŸ™‚ That being said, I do plan on releasing some more sizes for this garment at some point, so depending on how quickly you make the projects for your friends, you may have that resource available πŸ™‚ However, I can’t guarantee when that might be

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  11. I am so excited to make this coat!! It’s all I can do to finish my current project and get started. I am thinking of doing 2 different β€˜unforgettable’ colors for the skirt portion and I’m wondering if you remember approximately how many skeins it took to do just the wedges for the skirt? I’m not sure the ratio of colors I should buy. 1skein per wedge or? I’m going to make the large one. I’m just so excited about this I can’t even tell you. I thought about designing something similar but you took all the work out of it for me and that’s awesome!! Thank you so much!!

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    • Yay! I’m so glad you like the design – I can’t wait to see your version πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ For the panels of the skirt, I think I got about 1 Pointed Wedge and 1 Simple Wedge at least from one skein of yarn, with some left over. It’s possible one skein could cover 2 full Pointed Wedges, but I can’t recall for sure – either way you get close to two wedges from one skein of Unforgettable ❀

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